Perry Cuskey

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Perry Cuskey last won the day on May 22

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About Perry Cuskey

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  • Birthday 01/21/1961

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  1. A few more. Pictures courtesy of Ed Wertz, and used with his permission. He also gets caption credit for the first one.
  2. Brent, in addition to the excellent sources that Ozzy provided, here is a very good article on the 47th Tennessee at Shiloh that I came across a while back. It's written by a historian named Sean Michael Chick, who has authored a book on Petersburg: https://emergingcivilwar.com/2016/09/08/the-47th-tennessee-infantry-at-shiloh/ Unfortunately, with one exception, he doesn't list any sources, but he does appear to have done some serious research on the regiment. He also includes a picture of Colonel Hill, adding in the comments that he found it online. I don't know if that means he's uncertain of its authenticity, but he did include the image with the article. He looks like a good source of information about the regiment. The one source that he mentions, in the article itself, is the West Tennessee Whig newspaper. Also, the University of Memphis has a collection of letters from Private John J. Davis of the 47th Tennessee, written to his wife. I was able to download a pdf of the transcribed letters, or perhaps transcribed portions of the letters, I'm not certain. Here's the link to the overview page: http://uldr.memphis.edu/vital/access/manager/Collection/vital:109 And the page where you can download the pdf file: http://uldr.memphis.edu/vital/access/manager/Repository/vital:1890?root=vital%3A109 While checking the Tennessee State Library and Archives for something on the West Tennessee Whig, I also came across a listing for a small book or pamphlet on the 47th Tennessee written by a Brent Cox. Would that be you? Perry
  3. Thanks ladies. And no worries, Michele. Besides, slipping, tripping, and/or falling down on a Shiloh hike is a little like getting turned around or lost out in the park - it's a right of passage.
  4. From my previous reply: "But most visitors to the park still arrived via the Tennessee River up until about the 20's or early 30's"
  5. There are other sections of roads in the park that follow their wartime course, but yes, there has been a lot of adjustments, if you will, including by Thompson himself. And some wartime roads ("paths" is probably more accurate) aren't even there anymore, even as traces. Some of them were still there when the park was first created, but are now completely gone. The two guesses that Hank and Jim made - the Corinth Road and Beauregard Road, look similar to that picture of the Hamburg-Savannah Road in stretches, and follow their respective wartime routes. I kind of doubt that the Hamburg-Savannah Road was unintentionally left intact though. If Thompson had felt it needed straightening or curving somewhere, it would have happened. But most visitors to the park still arrived via the Tennessee River up until about the 20's or early 30's, and I'd guess that then as now, the River Road didn't see a lot of visitor traffic. So there probably wasn't much point in making any significant changes. On Route 22, I don't believe it follows any historic route, no, at least north of the park. The "old" Highway 22, prior to the modern-day version opening in the early 60's I think it was, followed the Main Corinth Road through the park. A point that board member C.D. Rickman made during the anniversary weekend when the subject came up. C.D. said that locals referred to the new highway as the "bypass," and I think he added that long-time residents still do. Perry
  6. A little fun from some of our Epic Treks.... (Photo credit: Michele) (Photo credit: Ed Wertz) (Photo credit: Mike Talplacido) (Photo credit: Michele) (Photo credit: Michele) (Photo credit: No one claims this one) (Photo credit: Mike Talplacido) (Photo credit: Michele) We'll be doing another Epic Trek this November. Why not join us? You'll have a great time, and who knows, you might wind up as a caption. Perry
  7. I forgot to mention, even though it's kind of obvious - but Lew Wallace and his men traveled down this stretch of road on their famous (or infamous) march to the battlefield on April 6th, after crossing Snake Creek. You're looking north in the picture, so their line of march would have been toward the camera.
  8. Hmmm. I know the siege gun display has been changed some in recent years. I can't remember off-hand the siege guns never being there, but my memory could be fooling me on that. Could be they've come and gone at various times, but I honestly don't know.
  9. We have a winner! Hamburg-Savannah Road it is. The 'catch' about the picture is that, as Mona guessed, it's from the section of the road north of Highway 22, between there and Snake Creek. It's technically inside the park, but since it's across the highway from the rest of the park, and blocked by a gate to keep vehicles out, I doubt it gets many visitors. In fact, this was the first time I had ever been over there myself. Michele and I walked along it maybe half-a-mile or so before turning around near that downed tree across the road. And like I told Jim, I probably would have guessed it to be Beauregard Road if I didn't already know what it was. So congrats to Mona - she's now officially the River Road Queen. Here's a screenshot from Google Maps. The red circle near the top shows the approximate location of the picture.
  10. That's what I would probably guess if I didn't know otherwise, Jim. Here's another hint, and this one might give it away - think Yanks instead of Rebs.
  11. Ozzy, this one is kind of tricky. It's hard to tell, but there are no monuments along this particular road. Well actually there is one, but it's a fair distance behind me in this picture. Another hint below.
  12. Here's a link to an even earlier picture of the siege guns taken from very near the 1941 spot and from a similar angle. It's from the Kern collection, which we've highlighted on here before, and doubtless will again. No cannons in this image, but the monument is there, which dates the picture to sometime after 1904, when Illinois dedicated its Shiloh monuments. You can clearly see the Corinth Road running in front of the monument in this image. That section of the road is now only a trace, and closed off to traffic. http://daytonhistory.pastperfect-online.com/34465cgi/mweb.exe?request=image&hex=K58009.JPG
  13. That's a good guess Hank, but it's not the Corinth Road. I'll give another hint this evening if no one figures it out.
  14. This is a picture I took at Shiloh last fall. Who wants to take a crack at naming where it is? Here's a kinda sorta hint: It's not the Sunken Road.
  15. Man, that would be a good trip. And you know, as long as you're already in Tennessee and heading to Gettysburg, you may as well stop off at Perryville, Chickamauga, Stone's River, the Shenandoah Valley, Harper's Ferry, Antietam......