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  1. My gg grandfather Dr. Wm C Cross established hospital headquarters for Woods brigade at the Mickey/Michie house. When we were there last Fall, we went to the Pebble Hill intersection someone had directed us to. The roads have been moved and we did not receive precise instructions. I just stood there and wondered exactly where the house was, where the dead were buried, and how in the world Dr Cross was able to perform his duties under the circumstances. On my next visit to Shiloh, I would like to stand on the actual ground where the house stood. I cant really explain it. But I would like to know exactly where it happened. Surely there is someone still alive who knows exactly where the house was located? Dr Cross originally enlisted as surgeon of 16th AL at Courtland, AL. He was promoted to senior surgeon Woods Brigade and served as such at the Battle of Shiloh. Woods Brigade was 3rd Brigade, 3rd Corps, Army of the Mississippi CSA and included 16th AL, 27th TN, 44th TN, 55th TN, 3rd MS Bat, 8th AR, 9th AR Bat, MS Bat, and GA Dragoons. The history of 44th Regiment (TN) was written by Dr. D. J. Noblitt of Lincoln County, a surgeon who served with the 44th throughout the war. His account follows: "The Mickey house had been selected by Dr. Cross (my gg grandfather) as hospital head-quarters for our brigade. By his order tents had been erected for the comfort and protection of the wounded in the yard. After examining wounds and temporarily dressing them on the field, Dr. Noblitt, aided by Dr. Chandler, had succeeded on Monday morning in transferring their wounded from the field to the Mickey house, and as comfortably quartered as could be expected with the surroundings. Rain fell Sunday night. About two o'clock p.m. Monday there was a ruinous stampede among the wagon and ambulance men, and was not fully quieted until night. It happened that a man came riding at full speed among the trains, crying, "Take care of yourselves! The Yankee cavalry has broken our lines, and will be on you in a minute!" Many of the drivers took one horse or a mule, and made all possible speed to Corinth. Others drove to the Mickey house and unloaded the wounded on the ground, without tent or fly. The ground was covered with the wounded, the dead, and the dying. After dark the rain fell in torrents upon hundreds of the poor fellows. Their agonizing cries, moans, and prayers for help and water were audible above the dashing rain and rolling thunder. But in the long night-watch the rain ceased, the thunder hushed, and so had the cries of the suffering in the stillness of death. Morning came, and with it a melancholy sight - a sleeping camp. Men lay in every possible posture, with eyes closed as if in sleep on crimson beds. The rain had washed the blood from their clothes and blankets, making the earth red. Drs. Cross, Lawrence, and Noblitt worked all night attending the different calls and operating. Neither of them had slept for more than forty-eight hours. Late Monday evening it was understood that the hospitals and wounded would be surrendered on Tuesday morning. Dr. Noblitt succeeded in securing wagons to carry sixty-five wounded and one dead (Lieut. Patterson) to Corinth." http://www.petersburgbreakthrough.org/44thTNp2.htm