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Found 9 results

  1. Larger than Life

    There are a number of figures, both North and South, that are iconic: they seem to encapsulate the essence of the American Civil War. For me, these include Grant and Sherman; Beauregard and Bragg; Robert E. Lee; Andrew Foote; George H. Thomas; N.B. Forrest and J.H. Morgan; and, of course, Jefferson Davis and Abraham Lincoln. Perhaps you look at my list of eleven names, and feel "someone important is missing" ...maybe David Farragut, or Raphael Semmes, or Stonewall Jackson. Regardless, if you accept that six-and-a-half of the "iconic figures" (Thomas arrived late), were present at Shiloh; can you think of another battle that featured as many icons, or more? Just another reason why the Battle of Shiloh is so remarkable... Ozzy
  2. West Point at Shiloh

    Here is a test of your knowledge of West Point alumni present at Battle of Shiloh: Who were the three highest-ranked graduates in their USMA Class, present at Shiloh? (Hint: it wasn't U.S. Grant, ranked 21st in USMA Class of 1843; and it wasn't William Tecumseh Sherman, ranked 6th in his USMA Class of 1840... but these three graduates were ranked one, two and three in their respective USMA classes.) Which two U. S. Military Academy graduates, present at Shiloh, wrote books prior to Battle of Shiloh on military tactics, or military procedures? Name five of the six Military Academy graduates, present at Shiloh, who served as instructors, Superintendent, or Commandant of Cadets at West Point. (Hint: although George H. Thomas served as Instructor of Cavalry Tactics at West Point, he arrived too late to take part in Battle of Shiloh.) Which Federal officer at Shiloh graduated from the same USMA Class as Leonidas Polk? Who was the youngest West Point alumnus at Shiloh (Class of 1861, but resigned before graduation to join the Confederacy)? Which institution of higher learning had more alumni present at Pittsburg Landing/Crump's/Savannah on 6-7 April 1862: West Point ? or Upper Iowa University ? All the best Ozzy Another hint: all answers can be found through reference http://penelope.uchicago.edu/Thayer/E/Gazetteer/Places/America/United_States/Army/USMA/Cullums_Register/ and following the cues.
  3. We're all familiar with Federal units that were "off the grid" -- not directly involved with the Battle of Shiloh. Some were "on their way" (such as George Thomas' 1st Division, Army of the Ohio); others were guarding the Post of Savannah (53rd Illinois and 53rd Indiana... and for a while, the 14th Wisconsin Infantry); and others were further afield (such as the 31st Illinois, acting as garrison for Federal-controlled Fort Donelson.) But, what about the Cavalry organization most often referred to as "Curtis Horse" ? Although not at Pittsburg Landing, this unit was assigned directly to Major General Grant, and performed a useful role during the Siege of Fort Donelson; and was involved in significant operations during build up of force in vicinity of Crump's and Pittsburg Landing. Name the State affiliation and number of this Cavalry organization. Ozzy Bonus: 1) What was the significant mission accomplished prior to surrender of Fort Donelson? 2) Name a date and location (prior to Shiloh) that any of the three significant operations involving Curtis Horse occurred? (Someone clever can list all three.)
  4. It's just a quiz...

    Here are four questions to challenge your Shiloh/Civil War Knowledge: After Virginia, which State had the greatest number of Civil War military actions within its borders? Which Confederate officer wrote an after-action report for Fort Henry... and for Fort Donelson (present at both; captured at neither)? [Hint: he was wounded at Shiloh.] "Complete Victory" was claimed in General Beauregard's report of April 6th to Richmond, following on the First Day at Shiloh. But, in conjunction with "Manchester Bluff" and "Come Retribution," the phrase "Complete Victory" had another important usage within the Confederacy. What was that other usage? One of Ulysses S. Grant's little-recognized skills was his ability to identify talented men, and put them to work for him. Often, these "talented men" belonged to someone else at the time (for example, Surgeon John H. Brinton technically "belonged" to Major General John Fremont before joining General Grant's staff in September 1861; and James B. McPherson "belonged" to Major General Henry Halleck, before joining Grant's staff in February 1862.) The following officers: W. F. Brinck (acting Ordnance Officer at Shiloh); J. D. Webster (Grant's Chief of Staff); and Benjamin Grierson (conducted a cavalry raid for General Grant, as diversion during Vicksburg Campaign)... all worked for the same Brigadier General, before finding employment with U.S. Grant. Name that Brigadier General. Good Hunting Ozzy
  5. The Draft Riot

    We're all familiar with the story: that the Draft was suggested by the Governor as a "necessary emergency measure" ...how the citizens expressed dismay at the Government's decision... the way the local newspapers expressed outrage and disgust, and inflamed public opinion. On the day the Draft was initiated, there were riots and bloodshed; and the "draft lottery boxes" were destroyed by an angry mob... on Monday, December 2nd 1861 (not in New York City.) The story is told that the first National draft during the War of the Rebellion was initiated by the Confederate States Government on April 16th 1862. And President Lincoln's Government enacted its own Draft Act on March 3rd 1863. But forgotten are the many State draft laws attempted prior to initiation of the National legislation. So the question: What city experienced the Draft Riot of December 2nd 1861 and who was Governor of the affected State? Ozzy
  6. Tennessee Governor

    Here's an easy question (or is it?) At the time of the Battle of Shiloh, who was the Governor of Tennessee? Ozzy
  7. Confederate OR

    Official Reports of Battles, Published by Order of Congress at Richmond, Virginia by Enquirer Book and Job Press (1862). Every once in a while, a real gem appears on archive.org ...and this is one of them. If you ever wondered where the Confederate side of the story came from (which appears in the Official Records of the War of the Rebellion) this book answers the question: the Confederate Government published these records for use by Confederate Congress and other agencies within the government. This title begins with the Battle of Manassas (General Beauregard's report of August 26th 1861) on page 5; and concludes with the Battle of Richmond, Kentucky (fought August 29-30 of 1862). Two reports were added late: Colonel Adolphus Heiman's report of Fort Henry (submitted after his release from Northern prison); and Colonel N.B. Forrest's report IRT destruction of military stores just prior to February 1862 surrender of Nashville. Of course, the Battle of Shiloh is comprehensively covered... or is it? (Several curious omissions are apparent, when this "time capsule" constructed in 1862 is compared to the United States version of the same records, which began to appear in 1881. And not only Shiloh.) Comprehensive Index on page 573. Available online at archive.org (see link below). Ozzy http://archive.org/stream/southernhistoryo00conf#page/572/mode/2up Official Reports of Battles (CSA) 1862
  8. Patrick Gregg

    Captain Patrick Gregg of the 58th Illinois was one of the two hundred members of his regiment, taken prisoner at Shiloh. Along with the other 2200 Federal prisoners, he experienced the deprivations of 'half-rations,' inadequate shelter, and abundant vermin (lice). Before the end of April 1862, men began to die in the Southern prisons, due to lack of proper care. While confined as a prisoner at Selma, Alabama, Captain Gregg was appointed to a committee, with the authority to correspond with General Beauregard, in order to advocate for a 'special exchange,' of Shiloh prisoners for Fort Donelson prisoners. The correspondence was successful: General Beauregard authorized a 3-man commission, to be sent north via Richmond to Washington, D.C. to negotiate the special exchange. Patrick Gregg was one of the three selected to go. As Captain John Stibbs of the 12th Iowa noted in his diary: 'Time passed. Those of us at Selma were moved to a new prison at Madison, Georgia. We began to believe the mission had been fruitless.' Meanwhile, the commissioners were attempting to negotiate the special exchange, without luck. It is acknowledged, however, that these three men helped bring about the general program of prisoner exchange, known as the Dix-Hill Cartel of July 1862. Believing this outcome to be the best they could do, two commissioners ceased their efforts, and accepted their own 'special' exchanges. Captain Gregg pressed ahead, and eventually met President Lincoln, face to face. He told his story, and explained that he was acting on behalf of others; and demanded that he be allowed to 'complete his mission.' The President sent him on his way, with one month's pay, for every officer in captivity, and a safe-conduct pass. As Captain Stibbs relates: 'One day, we espied the tall form of Captain Gregg, marching up to our prison gate; [he was in possession of] a bag of gold, and boxes filled with clothing. God bless old Captain Gregg!' Patrick Gregg remained in custody until the general release of Shiloh prisoners, in October 1862. From the book: A Perfect Picture of Hell: eyewitness accounts by Civil War Prisoners from the 12th Iowa, edited by Ted Genoways and Hugh H. Genoways, University of Iowa Press, Iowa City, 2001, pp. 113-115.
  9. First Bowtie?

    A few days after the Battle of Shiloh, U.S. Grant notified recently-arrived Henry Halleck of intelligence from a "trusted source" IRT Rebel plans to cross the Tennessee River at Florence, march north, and attack Savannah. Grant proposed an expedition to cripple the bridge at Florence; and if possible, destroy the Bear Creek Bridge of the M&C R.R. east of Iuka. Halleck approved the operation, and on the evening of April 12th General Sherman led a brigade of infantry and 100 cavalrymen aboard two transports; and in company with timberclads Tyler and Lexington proceeded up the Tennessee River... but the bar at Chickasaw Bluff halted the progress of the expedition. Sherman landed his force at Chickasaw Landing at 7 next morning and rushed south. Drove away the Rebels guarding Bear Creek Bridge. Tore up the rails for five hundred feet west of the bridge. Burned the bridge. Then melted the collected-up railroad iron over a raging bonfire... Satisfied, and with few casualties, Sherman ordered his force back aboard the transports and returned to Pittsburg Landing evening of April 13th. Next day, he made his report to Grant (via Rawlins) [Papers of US Grant volume 5 pages 41-43]. Sherman had finally cut that railroad line (although General Ormsby Mitchel had beaten him by two days, cutting the M&C R.R. at Huntsville.) And the two rumored Confederate gunboats were still lurking somewhere upriver from Chickasaw. So the only real significance of the Expedition: Sherman bent up his first of many irreplaceable Confederate rails. (Over 90% of rails used by the Confederacy were imported from England.) Ozzy From Harper's Weekly of 1864, one of the more elaborate designs...
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