Jump to content
Shiloh Discussion Group

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'shiloh'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Welcome Center
    • Welcome
    • Board FAQ
    • Posting Guidelines
    • Announcements
    • Suggestion Box
    • Shiloh Timeline
    • Howdy
    • Campfire
    • Birthday Wishes
    • Pop Quiz!
  • Storm Clouds
    • Fort Henry
    • Fort Donelson
    • Retreat from Kentucky
    • Advance to Pittsburg Landing
    • Build-up to the Battle
  • A Place of War
    • The Battle of Shiloh
    • April 6th
    • April 7th
    • Eyewitness Accounts
    • Personalities
    • Army of the Tennessee
    • Army of the Ohio
    • Army of the Mississippi
    • The Union Navy
    • Local Civilians
    • Aftermath & Impact
  • Weapons & Ammunition at Shiloh
    • Artillery
    • Small Arms
  • A Place of Peace
    • Visiting Shiloh
    • History of the Park
    • News About the Park
    • Videos
  • Anniversary Hikes
    • 2017 Anniversary
    • 2016 Anniversary
    • 2015 Anniversary
    • 2014 Anniversary
    • 2013 Anniversary
    • 2012 Anniversary
    • 2011 Anniversary
    • 2010 Anniversary
    • 2009 Anniversary
    • 2008 Anniversary
    • 2007 Anniversary
  • Back to the Future
    • Shiloh on the Web
    • Resources
    • Help With Board Problems

Blogs

  • Wrapin About the War
  • Crazyhop's Blog
  • Damnyankee @ Shiloh
  • dudits' Blog

Calendars

  • Community Calendar

Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Location


Occupation


Interests

Found 39 results

  1. West Point at Shiloh

    Here is a test of your knowledge of West Point alumni present at Battle of Shiloh: Who were the three highest-ranked graduates in their USMA Class, present at Shiloh? (Hint: it wasn't U.S. Grant, ranked 21st in USMA Class of 1843; and it wasn't William Tecumseh Sherman, ranked 6th in his USMA Class of 1840... but these three graduates were ranked one, two and three in their respective USMA classes.) Which two U. S. Military Academy graduates, present at Shiloh, wrote books prior to Battle of Shiloh on military tactics, or military procedures? Name five of the six Military Academy graduates, present at Shiloh, who served as instructors, Superintendent, or Commandant of Cadets at West Point. (Hint: although George H. Thomas served as Instructor of Cavalry Tactics at West Point, he arrived too late to take part in Battle of Shiloh.) Which Federal officer at Shiloh graduated from the same USMA Class as Leonidas Polk? Who was the youngest West Point alumnus at Shiloh (Class of 1861, but resigned before graduation to join the Confederacy)? Which institution of higher learning had more alumni present at Pittsburg Landing/Crump's/Savannah on 6-7 April 1862: West Point ? or Upper Iowa University ? All the best Ozzy Another hint: all answers can be found through reference http://penelope.uchicago.edu/Thayer/E/Gazetteer/Places/America/United_States/Army/USMA/Cullums_Register/ and following the cues.
  2. It's just a quiz...

    Here are four questions to challenge your Shiloh/Civil War Knowledge: After Virginia, which State had the greatest number of Civil War military actions within its borders? Which Confederate officer wrote an after-action report for Fort Henry... and for Fort Donelson (present at both; captured at neither)? [Hint: he was wounded at Shiloh.] "Complete Victory" was claimed in General Beauregard's report of April 6th to Richmond, following on the First Day at Shiloh. But, in conjunction with "Manchester Bluff" and "Come Retribution," the phrase "Complete Victory" had another important usage within the Confederacy. What was that other usage? One of Ulysses S. Grant's little-recognized skills was his ability to identify talented men, and put them to work for him. Often, these "talented men" belonged to someone else at the time (for example, Surgeon John H. Brinton technically "belonged" to Major General John Fremont before joining General Grant's staff in September 1861; and James B. McPherson "belonged" to Major General Henry Halleck, before joining Grant's staff in February 1862.) The following officers: W. F. Brinck (acting Ordnance Officer at Shiloh); J. D. Webster (Grant's Chief of Staff); and Benjamin Grierson (conducted a cavalry raid for General Grant, as diversion during Vicksburg Campaign)... all worked for the same Brigadier General, before finding employment with U.S. Grant. Name that Brigadier General. Good Hunting Ozzy
  3. It is not very often that a first-hand account of the actions of the 6th Division during the first hours of Day One, and during the stand at the Hornet's Nest comes to light. The following link takes you to the Little Falls Transcript of Little Falls, Minnesota (edition of September 14th 1883.) Beginning page 6, column 6 is the article, "In the Hornet's Nest" by Sergeant Gibhart Kurts (sometimes identified as Gilbert Kurtz) of the 18th Missouri Infantry, Co.K. Of interest: although listing all the regiments belonging to the 6th Division at Shiloh, Sergeant Kurts appears to be unaware that the 1st Minnesota Light Artillery (Munch's Battery) belonged to the 6th Division. Sergeant Kurts is aware of the strengthening of pickets and outposts; and recalls seeing General Prentiss attempting to rally the troops before everyone "fell back to the hill in the rear." http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89064525/1883-09-14/ed-1/seq-6/#date1=1878&index=0&rows=20&words=Prentiss&searchType=basic&sequence=0&state=Minnesota&date2=1884&proxtext=Prentiss&y=17&x=13&dateFilterType=yearRange&page=1 Little Falls Transcript of September 14th 1883, courtesy of Library of Congress and Chronicling America. Ozzy
  4. Civil War Traveler

    Was looking for information about Civil War baseball games, and ran across this site: http://www.civilwartraveler.com/ Civil War Traveler promotes itself as "offering info needed before heading off to visit battlefields." Seems to be relatively comprehensive; and the entry for Shiloh is concise: http://www.civilwartraveler.com/WEST/TN/W-Shiloh.html Shiloh Battlefield at Civil War Traveler. Just thought it might be of interest to see how others promote Shiloh... Ozzy N.B. Here is the baseball site which led me to Civil War Traveler: http://www.alexandriava.gov/historic/fortward/default.aspx?id=40132#Spaulding City of Alexandria webpage with entry on Civil War Baseball (which is not badly done, except for misspelling Albert Spalding 's name.) And the link that takes you to Civil War Traveler is at very bottom of "Civil War Baseball" page [ Another Great Civil War Resource -- above the "Lightspan Academic Excellence Award" emblem.]
  5. It appears baseball was played by General Grant's troops, during their abundant leisure time, after the victory at Fort Donelson. The game may have been introduced to regiments undergoing training at Benton Barracks. Alternatively, one or more of the regiments from Milwaukee, Chicago, or Ohio may have imported the game when they arrived at Pittsburg Landing in March 1862. It is confirmed that a baseball was discovered on Shiloh Battlefield, a few days after the carnage, by a civilian working for the Union army. G. F. Hellum was so impressed by his find, he etched details of the location of his discovery into the hide, turning the lemon-peel ball into a trophy. Now, consider the story of Sgt. Edward Spalding, Co. E, 52nd Illinois. In action on Sunday, the 6th of April, he was twice wounded, but refused to be removed from the field. He remained fighting, in open ground, until the close of the battle. Finally taken to Hospital at Pittsburg Landing in time to have wounds to his left arm dressed, he should have made a full recovery. But, days passed, and his condition worsened. Somehow, Ed Spalding's parents found out about their son's predicament; his father, Asa, journeyed to Pittsburg Landing and took him home, to Rockford, Illinois. The improvement in care, furnished in a loving home, probably saved his life. But, it still required time for his wounds to fully heal. While recuperating, he was visited by his 11-year-old cousin, Albert, to whom he introduced the rules of the game of Baseball. Edward returned to his regiment in November 1862, was promoted to second lieutenant, and continued to serve until mustered out in December 1864. Albert Spalding took to his cousin's game so well, that he went on to become a professional baseball player, playing as pitcher, centerfielder, and first baseman, for the Boston Red Stockings, and the Chicago White Stockings. In 1876, he co-founded A. G. Spalding Sporting Goods; he continued to promote 'the National Pastime' for the rest of his life.
  6. On April 26th 1862, after the dust had settled a bit on the momentous contest that had taken place in vicinity of Pittsburg Landing, E. G. Squier, editor of Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, made use of previously published reports by Whitelaw Reid and William C. Carroll -- and eyewitness statements provided by his own reporter on the scene -- and constructed the following article: The Great Battle in the South-West "The long-anticipated great battle in the South-West was fought on the 6th and 7th of April, at a point called Pittsburg Landing, on the Tennessee River, in the south-western portion of the State of Tennessee, near the northern boundary of Mississippi. As regards the numbers engaged, and equally as regards the number of killed and wounded on both sides, this battle ranks as the most serious struggle of the war. It commenced on the morning of Sunday, the 6th, and was protracted over two days, ending on the night of Monday the 7th with the flight of the rebel army, which left its Commander-in-Chief, Maj.-Gen. A.S. Johnston, dead on the field. Considered as a whole, the Battle of Pittsburg Landing may be described as a repetition of Bull Run on a larger scale, but with its results reversed. The enemy here made the attack in superior force, gained an undoubted success on the first day, but were overpowered by reinforcements of the National army on the second day, and driven from the field. Either because the National army was very much cut up, from lack of efficiency in its commanders, or from causes yet to be explained, the retreat of the enemy was little molested -- thus completing the parallel with Bull Run, where the rebels permitted the National forces to fall back undisturbed to their entrenchments. There is much that is unintelligible and unsatisfactory about the affair at Pittsburg Landing, and much which reflects unfavorably upon the generalship displayed by the National commanders. The Union forces on the left bank of the Tennessee River, under Gen. Grant, numbered about 35,000 men. Advancing to his support, from the direction of Nashville, by easy stages, and with that slow deliberation which characterizes all his movements, was that remarkably intelligent and enterprising officer, Gen. Buell, at the head of 40,000 men. In front of Gen. Grant, on the same side of the river, and less than twenty miles distant, were Generals Johnston, Beauregard, Bragg, Polk, and Evans, with the combined rebel forces from Bowling Green, Columbus, Memphis, Pensacola and Mobile, with large augmentations from Virginia, in all at least 100,000 men, massed together with the obvious and avowed purpose of crushing the Northern army by the weight of numbers. All this was known for weeks, and yet Grant's comparatively little army was left at Pittsburg with a river behind it, and Buell loitering by the way, while Maj.-Gen. Halleck, whose duty it was to be with his army, lingered in St. Louis. It was under these circumstances that Johnston, having rapidly concentrated his forces, resolved upon the very natural expedient of massing his army on Grant, overwhelm him, and then cut off Buell the Tardy. It is astounding that Gen. Grant did not anticipate and in some way provide against a movement which the smallest modicum of common sense, to say nothing of military knowledge, pointed out so clearly as the true one to be made. Yet it is a fact, that the attack on Sunday morning was in every sense a surprise. It does not seem that the ordinary precaution of posting pickets in the direction of the enemy had been adopted. The Pittsburg Landing correspondent of the Chicago Times states positively that our officers were informed by rebel prisoners that an attack would be made on Sunday, "but that no extra measures were taken to guard against surprise." The prevailing impression seems to have been, that the rebels would strengthen their entrenchments at Corinth, and there await the attack of the combined National army. Halleck appears to have been of this belief, Grant certainly acted as if he thought any other policy impossible, and Buell seems to have cared very little about the matter. This blindness, supineness and lack of energy proved nearly fatal to the National cause in the South-West. Had not Johnston been prevented by storms from making his attack earlier, Gen. Grant's division must have inevitably been cut up and captured. As it was, the rebel force, estimated at 90,000 strong, swooped down on Gen. Grant, on Sunday morning, with such rapidity and impetuosity, that the outlying camps were captured almost at the instant; "so quickly," says one correspondent, "that many of the soldiers were taken or slaughtered in their tents." Gen. Prentiss' brigade, on the advance, seems to have been captured bodily. Desperate efforts were made by the National commanders to retrieve themselves, and they and their men fought all day with desperate energy, against the overpowering force of the rebels, flushed with the successes of the morning. But in spite of all their exertions they were gradually driven from their positions back to the river, losing battery after battery, and were only saved from annihilation at nightfall by getting under the protection of the gunboats on the river. The rebels occupied the Union camps, leaving to the morning the consummation of their victory. Their Commander-in-Chief had fallen during the day, but his place was more than filled -- in the rebel estimation -- by Beauregard, who, during the night, telegraphed to the insurgent Government that, under Almighty God, he had "gained a complete victory." His dispatch was as follows: "Battlefield of Shiloh, April 6, via Corinth and Chattanooga -- General S. Cooper, Adjutant-General -- 'We have this morning attacked the enemy in a strong position in front of Pittsburg, and after a severe battle of ten hours, thanks to Almighty God, gained a complete victory, driving the enemy from every position. The loss on both sides is heavy, including our Commander-in-Chief, Gen. Albert Sidney Johnston, who fell gallantly leading his troops into the thickest of the fight.' -- G.T. Bearegard, General-Commanding." During the night, however, Gen. Buell's division appeared on the banks of the Tennessee River, behind the shattered Union army, and the work of crossing was commenced. When morning broke, the astounded Beauregard found, to his alarm, that a new army had sprung up as from the ground before him. No time was left him for reflection or preparation, for now it was his turn to be attacked. His reserves were ordered up, and before 10 o'clock the battle became general. At half-past eleven it was at its height, and raged furiously. The commanders on both sides flew to the front and headed the charges of their respective commands. Wallace, Grant, Nelson and McClernand were everywhere, inspiring their men by word and example. At noon the rebels began to fall back, slowly at first, but gradually hastening their movements, abandoning battery on battery more rapidly than they had gained them the day before, until at three o'clock they were in full retreat for Corinth, abandoning their dead and wounded on the field, failing, as we have already said, to carry off the body of their Commander-in-Chief. That the victory rested with the National army is indubitable. How far it may prove to be decisive remains to be seen. That Gen. Grant's division was in imminent danger of being cut to pieces is certain, and that this danger was due partly to blind confidence and want of ordinary provision on his part, but mainly to the inexcusable delay of Gen. Buell in reinforcing him, is clear -- clear, unless additional facts, unknown to the public, shall entirely change the aspect of the whole affair. The losses on both sides were very heavy -- much heavier than in any previous battle of the war. The first reports were vague and exaggerated: "25,000 killed and wounded on the side of the National forces; 30,000 on the part of the enemy." Later reports put the Union loss in killed, wounded and prisoners at 7000; those of the rebels, in killed and wounded alone, at about the same figure. Absurd censorship, or some other cause, has prevented us, at the end of a week, from knowing the exact state of facts. We, however, do know that the rebel Commander-in-Chief was killed; that Gen. Gladden lost an arm; that Gen. Prentiss of the National army was captured; and the gallant Wallace severely wounded. Late reports, vouched for by Gen. Banks, represent Beauregard as severely wounded, and since dead. It will take time to resolve all the conflicting statements and rumors into a consistent and truthful whole. Meantime, it is enough, perhaps, to know that the eagle of victory still perches on our standard! And it only remains for us to add the Proclamation of the President, and the Order of the Secretary of War, called out by the bloody achievement at Pittsburg Landing, and the really great victory won by Com. Foote and Gen. Pope on the Mississippi..." [President Lincoln's Proclamation of Thanks and Secretary Stanton's Summation attached.] Ozzy [Just a few observations, to go with the above article: although written by E.G. Squier, significant input was provided by the sketch artist, Henri Lovie, who sent along his observations (while remaining at Pittsburg Landing, continuing to sketch.) The above article appears on Page One... of the Supplement [a two-volume edition published as No.337 and No.338 on April 26th 1862]. The entirety of Frank Leslie's Illustrated, Edition No.337 is devoted to the Victory at Island No.10 ...with all aspects of that Campaign discussed and sketched. The War Supplement (Edition No.338) has "The Great Battle of the South-West" on its cover, above a sketch of the Victory at Island No.10 -- and on the 4th page of the Supplement, another sketch of a significant operation at Island No.10 (Colonel Robert's Night Raid against the Guns at Fort No.1) attributed to Henri Lovie. In all of the two volumes of the April 26th Edition, the only illustration with a connection to Battle of Shiloh is inadvertent: "F. Munson of Chicago, the Volunteer Nurse (aboard City of Memphis steamer)." The City of Memphis was used as Hospital Boat at Shiloh, after April 6th.] Reference: http://archive.org/stream/franklesliesilluv1314lesl#page/n393/mode/2up "The Great Battle of the South-West" in the War Supplement [Edition No.338] of April 26th 1862 Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, page 396 [401 on page].
  7. Bohemian Brigade

    We've all heard of the Union Brigade, the Iowa Brigade, the "High Pressure" Brigade, and the "Brigade of Discipline." What was the Bohemian Brigade? Ozzy
  8. Name the Artist

    Here's an easy one (as only a handful of sketch artists are known to have worked in vicinity of Pittsburg Landing, April 1862): Name the artist of the above sketch (first and last name.) Good luck... Ozzy
  9. Born in Baden, German Federation in 1834, Adolph Metzner migrated to America in 1856 ...and raised a company of Turner Society members at Indianapolis (which became Company A of the 32nd Indiana Infantry) Colonel August Willich, commanding. Attached to Army of the Ohio after muster in August 1861, the 32nd Indiana occupied Bowing Green, Kentucky in February 1862 ...stopped briefly in Nashville ...and joined the march south and west to Pittsburg Landing to reinforce U.S. Grant. Reaching the west side of the Tennessee River morning of April 7th, Colonel Willich led his men into a gap between W.T. Sherman and Lew Wallace (and gained the admiration of General Wallace for the gallant conduct of the regiment under fire.) But, most importantly for our purposes: Lieutenant Metzner was a sketch artist, working in pencil of various colors. August Willich at Green River, Kentucky 1862 [by Adolph Metzner] Everywhere the 32nd Indiana went, Metzner managed a sketch (and usually provided a date for the image): "Duck River Bridge at Columbia, March 21st 1862" [important because it shows condition of bridge that delayed Buell and apparent depth of the river.] Also, the other places marched through, and dates, are recorded. As concerns Shiloh, the only images I have encountered (of which there are three) are titled "Casualties." Adolph Metzner must have been astounded by the horror of Pittsburg Landing, as it presented to him: the images are gruesome and graphic. The 32nd Indiana joined Halleck's Crawl to Corinth: Metzner sketched scenes enroute, and ten or more in vicinity of Corinth. In addition, the artist sketched numerous images of soldiers and officers of the 32nd Indiana; sketched W.T. Sherman and U.S. Grant; and reproduced scenes from Chattanooga and Atlanta. In all, the Library of Congress holds over 120 sketches Metzner created during 1861-65 (and a further 70 CDVs that are only accessible at the Library.) Adolph Metzner survived the war, and lived out his life in New Jersey. Upon his death in 1918, his body was returned to Indianapolis for burial. Cheers Ozzy References: http://www.loc.gov/search/?fa=contributor%3Ametzner%2C+adolph&sp=1 Metzner Collection at LOC http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adolph_G._Metzner Metzner bio at wikipedia http://32ndindianainfantry.yolasite.com/ 32nd Indiana history (includes CDV of Adolph Metzner)
  10. Presented is an interesting telegram sent by Major George W. Brent (from the former Army of the Mississippi HQ at Jackson, Tennessee) to General Beauregard at Corinth on April 2nd 1862: http://civilwar.rosenbach.org/?p=5512 [from "Today in the Civil War: dispatches from the Rosenbach Collection"]. Ozzy
  11. Complete Victory...

    While reviewing Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper (volume 13, page 402 of the April 26, 1862 edition) encountered the full copy of General Beauregard's afternoon telegram to Richmond on Day One, just before suspending offensive operations. Here is the transcript: [From] Battle Field of Shiloh, April 6, via Corinth and Chattanooga [To] General S. Cooper, Adjutant-General: We have this morning attacked the enemy in a strong position in front of Pittsburg, and after a severe battle of ten hours, thanks to Almighty God, gained a complete victory, driving the enemy from every position. The loss on both sides is heavy, including our Commander-in-Chief, Gen. Albert Sidney Johnston, who fell gallantly leading his troops into the thickest of the fight. G. T. Beauregard, General-Commanding. Here are a few curiosities IRT the above telegram: In my review of Southern newspapers, I have yet to find this telegram in its entirety, anywhere, prior to May 1862. Yet here it is, in Frank Leslie's Illustrated on April 26th... Wonder how the Northern newspaper got hold of it? The original telegram received at Richmond would have had the relay stations -- Corinth (sending station) and Chattanooga (relay station) -- recorded. If the Confederate telegraph line was tapped, it must have occurred east of Chattanooga (perhaps in vicinity of Knoxville?) "after a severe battle of ten hours..." From this detail, the time of construction of this message by General Beauregard can be deduced. If it was believed the battle commenced with the first shots fired by the pickets, the battle began about 5am. If the advance of the first Confederate attack wave was referenced, then the attack began as late as 6am. Ten hours later places construction of the brief message between 3- 4pm (and then sent by mounted courier to the telegraph office) "driving the enemy from every position..." Jefferson Davis in his Rise and Fall of the Confederacy, bemoans the fact that what General Beauregard meant to say was this: "We have driven the enemy from every position, but ONE. (And this ONE cost us the Complete Victory.)" Ozzy
  12. Pictorial History

    Published in 1890 (and now available at hathitrust) this two-volume set of sketches contains images of Fort Donelson, Shiloh and Corinth you have probably never seen before: Pictorial History of The Soldier in our Civil War. In Volume one, the section on Fort Donelson begins page 235. Pittsburg Landing/Shiloh begins page 262 (with the image of "McClernand's Second Line on April 6th" of particular interest.) Also, a detailed diagram of Grant's Last Line, bottom of page 265. And on page 266, two-page sketch of Lew Wallace's advance April 7th. On page 268, an interesting sketch by Henri Lovie of "Hurlbut under attack at the Peach Orchard on April 6th." The section on Corinth: page 274- 280 (includes a sketch of the Female College at Corinth.) Links below... Ozzy http://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=mdp.39015020728781;view=2up;seq=272;size=300 Soldier in our Civil War, vol.1 http://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=mdp.39015046806710;view=2up;seq=10;size=125 Soldier in our Civil War, vol.2 N.B. There is also a sketch of Robert's Raid at Island No.10 (page 240) I had never seen anywhere else... Ozzy.
  13. Value of the POWs

    Sixteen hundred Federal prisoners commenced their slow march to Corinth on Monday morning, April 7th and soon began to realize things had not gone well militarily for their Southern captors. Many witnessed the body of General Albert Sidney Johnston (under escort of six officers) passing, enroute for the train to New Orleans via Memphis [Genoways p.56]. As the POWs trudged towards Corinth, there was no ignoring the makeshift hospitals -- one after another after another -- on both sides of the road, tending the Rebel wounded [Genoways p.96]. But the singular event that gave the captured men hope was the unexpected appearance of a squad of Confederate cavalry, obviously in a panic, that flew past -- heading South -- in the early afternoon [Genoways p.89 and 129]. Those mounted stragglers provided proof that their Federal comrades had reversed the tide of the battle; and offered hope that they would overtake the marching men before they reached Corinth, and re-capture them. Alas... not to be. Ozzy Reference: A Perfect Picture of Hell, Genoways & Genoways, University of Iowa Press (2001)
  14. From a jack to a King

    From W.S. Hillyer's letter of April 11th 1862 it is apparent U.S. Grant and his Staff officers believed they had the situation as they found it fully in hand within an hour or two of arriving at Pittsburg Landing on April 6th. Sherman was being pushed back, to be sure, but only gradually and grudgingly; Hurlbut, Prentiss and WHL Wallace were established in a naturally strong position; and orders had been sent for the 3rd Division to come up from Crump's, and the arrival of that strong, fresh force of reinforcements would be enough to tip the scales and assure Federal victory. Hillyer in his letter makes mention of Grant "sending staff officers flying across the battlefield, effecting orders" and Captain Hillyer, himself, was sent by General Grant on one occasion to direct a cavalry reconnaissance. At about 1pm Grant, Rowley (and possibly Hillyer) set out for another meeting with General Sherman; they were riding west along the Pittsburg-Purdy Road when they encountered the just-returned Cavalry officer, Frank Bennett, at the intersection with the Savannah-Hamburg Road (sometimes called the River Road.) And what Bennett reported -- Lew Wallace was not coming via the River Road -- must have hit General Grant like a hammer. Wallace's reinforcing division had been promised to Hurlbut/WHL Wallace; LtCol James McPherson had even identified the position where Lew Wallace would go... After sending Rowley and Bennett away back north (with orders to bring Lew Wallace via the River Road) General Grant aborted the intended meeting with Sherman: the priority now was to find out from Quartermaster Baxter what directions he'd delivered to Lew Wallace. Grant turned back east. And, as if the non-arrival of Lew Wallace wasn't enough bad news, when the General gained the bluff overlooking the Tennessee River, the steamers he'd sent hours earlier to ferry Nelson's men across from the east bank were still there, with no sign of activity in their vicinity. This had to be the low-water mark for Grant's fortunes (and outlook) on Day One: neither of his anticipated sources of reinforcements were coming. It is my belief that a readily-available staff officer (Captain Clark Lagow) was now pressed into service; given a hurriedly written order directed to "Commanding Officer, Advanced Forces" and verbal orders to "Hurry forward General Nelson." Lagow departed immediately on an available steamer (and at some stage during his transit down river put his verbal orders to General Nelson into written form, signed "C.B. Lagow ADC" [Papers of US Grant vol 5 pages 17-18]. General Grant entered the HQ building (where I believe John Rawlins acted as point-of-contact in Grant's absence) and probably confronted his Assistant Adjutant General in regard to what orders he'd authorized Baxter to deliver to Lew Wallace. While engaged in this conversation, word must have come that "the Tigress had just returned." Grant and Rawlins rode down to the Landing and boarded Tigress to confront Baxter. Present at this meeting in the Ladies' Cabin aboard the Headquarters boat were U.S. Grant, John Rawlins, W.S. Hillyer and A.S. Baxter. The time was just after 1:30 pm. Just an attempt to connect some dots... Ozzy References to be found in SDG posts "Buell meets Grant" ..."Letter of W.S. Hillyer" ... "Impression of Grant" ..."Where was Grant?" N.B. Apologies to Ned Miller for use of his 1957 song title, "From a Jack to a King."
  15. Zollicoffer's Brigade

    As we all know, Felix Zollicoffer was killed (as result of an odd blunder) at Battle of Mill Springs in January 1862. However, his Brigade lived on to fight again... at the Battle of Shiloh. Who commanded Zollicoffer's Brigade at Shiloh? Ozzy
  16. A Message sent by Steamer

    Sent from Pittsburg Landing on April 6th 1862 to: "Commanding Officer Advance Forces near Pittsburg, Ten -- General: The attack on my forces has been very spirited from early this morning. The appearance of fresh troops on the field now would have a powerful effect both by inspiring our men and disheartening the enemy. If you will get upon the field leaving all your baggage on the East bank of the river it will be a move to our advantage and possibly save the day to us. The rebel forces is estimated at over 100,000 men. My head quarters will be in the log building on top of the hill where you will be furnished a staff officer to guide you to your place on the field. Respectfully & etc. U.S. Grant, Major General" Our full understanding and appreciation of the above message suffers because it does not carry the clock time of its sending, leaving many to believe it was sent by General Grant within an hour or two of his arrival on the Battlefield. Some even believe Captain W.S. Hillyer was the courier who took the above message to Savannah. But the message is actually a politely-worded order which contains many interesting elements: sent from Pittsburg Landing sent by MGen Grant (not Rawlins, or another aide) sent to "the Commanding Officer" [because U.S. Grant did not yet know General Buell had already arrived in vicinity of Savannah] "fresh troops now would have an inspiring effect" "leave all your baggage behind" [This direction had unintended consequences.] "the rebel forces is estimated at over 100,000 men" [Did Grant believe this estimate; or merely sent for effect?] "My HQ are the log building on top of the hill" [Identifies General Grant's desired point-of-contact.] The above message was sent by courier, and intercepted by Don Carlos Buell before 2pm as he steamed up the Tennessee River (and is recorded in Buell's 1887 Century article, "Shiloh Reviewed.") Ozzy
  17. Diary from the 3rd Iowa

    Available online from the University of Iowa Library are these three diaries (for years 1861, 1862 and 1863) written by 20-year-old schoolteacher, Turner S. Bailey. Working in Epworth, Iowa (about three miles west of Dubuque) at the start of 1861, his diary for that year focuses on teaching classes, the weather, and local issues... until April 15th. "Considerable excitement about war. Fort Sumter taken by the South." Beginning with that entry, Turner indicates growing preoccupation with "war fever" until enlisting in the 3rd Iowa Co. A at Dubuque on May 22nd; travelling with the regiment to Keokuk in June; and duty in Missouri (guarding railroads) beginning in July. In March 1862, it was decided to add the 3rd Iowa to the growing Federal force on the Tennessee River; Private Bailey arrived opposite Pittsburg Landing on the 15th. On the 17th the 3rd Iowa went ashore at Pittsburg Landing and went into camp near "their friends in the 12th Iowa." Each subsequent day is faithfully recorded -- the weather, the skirmish on April 4th -- and of course, the Battle of April 6/7. On the attached link, click on the desired diary... a new page will open... click on the diary again for access to every page. [University of Iowa adds another diary, or collection of Civil War letters, about every 3-6 months, so worthwhile to check back every once in a while to see what's been made available.] http://www.iowaheritage.org/items/browse?advanced[0][element_id]=49&advanced[0][type]=is+exactly&advanced[0][terms]=Infantry Cheers Ozzy
  18. Buell meets Grant

    Depending on the reference, General Buell is reported to have arrived at Pittsburg Landing by steamer from Savannah early afternoon of April 6th and met General Grant: a) at the house near the river, or b] aboard Grant's dispatch boat (floating HQ) the Tigress. Upon review of primary sources, the only man who infers Buell met Grant at the house is John Rawlins, Grant's AAG [OR 10 page 185]. Every other primary source (including Grant, himself) indicates the initial meeting took place aboard the Tigress [Memoirs vol.1 page 283.] General Buell goes into more detail, and reports "that he arrived at Pittsburg Landing and enquired for General Grant, and was directed to the nearly adjacent dispatch boat. Buell went aboard and met General Grant at the door of the Ladies' Cabin. Several of Grant's Staff officers were also in that cabin [Century article of 1887, pages 492-493]. Also worth noting: General Buell was accompanied by at least one Staff officer, his Chief of Staff, James Barnet Fry. Why is this meeting and its location important? In the early afternoon, Grant's messengers returned from delivering their orders to MGen Lew Wallace. The first messenger encountered by Grant, Lieutenant Frank Bennett, was met by Grant and Captain Rowley (ADC) as the pair were riding west to meet with General Sherman. Cavalry Officer Bennett reported that he'd met Wallace and his 3rd Division while they were having dinner (between 1130 and noon) and that Wallace intended on taking the route that his written orders (delivered by Baxter) directed; Lew Wallace was not coming via the River Road. General Grant immediately sent Rowley and Bennett back north up the River Road with orders for Lew Wallace to "Bring your division to Pittsburg Landing via the River Road" and, in addition, gave Captain Rowley authority to put those orders in writing if Lew Wallace demanded. Grant watched the messengers depart; then aborted his meeting with Sherman, reversed course, and returned to Pittsburg Landing... to find the Tigress (carrying Captain A.S. Baxter, AQM) had returned from Crump's Landing. The "conversation" between John Rawlins, A.S. Baxter and U.S. Grant would have been most interesting... and may have been interrupted by the arrival of General Buell. Timing is everything... Ozzy N.B. The above meeting between Grant, Rawlins and Baxter is conjecture, based on timing of significant events -- Ozzy.
  19. On page 435 of MOLLUS (Ohio) volume 5 of 1903 is a detailed, informative letter written by Andrew Hickenlooper on April 11th 1862 to his family back in Ohio. In the letter, mention is made of the 5th Ohio Battery losing two guns and over fifty horses in the action on Sunday; and recall of 10,000 shirkers observed huddled along the left bank of the Tennessee River; and mention is made of being assigned early on Sunday morning to act as bodyguard to General Grant, and subsequently riding all along the Battlefield in company with the Federal commander... Wait a minute; what's going on here? As we know, Andrew Hickenlooper presents as one of the remarkable leaders at the Battle of Shiloh. In command of the 5th Independent Battery Ohio Volunteer Light Artillery (usually referred to as 5th Ohio Battery) Captain Hickenlooper began the morning of April 6th in defense of Prentiss' 6th Division, somewhat in advance of the camps; he fell back with Prentiss (leaving two of his 6-pounders behind) and redeployed in support of the area later known as the Hornet's Nest (the 5th Ohio Battery itself supported by Colonel Geddes 8th Iowa Infantry), and was there in action from just after 9am until about 4:30pm. Ordered to withdraw to the north, Hickenlooper successfully evacuated four artillery pieces north... and somehow became attached to Sherman's 5th Division (and in support of Sherman became involved in some of the final actions on Day 1 before night put an end to Sunday's fighting.) For such gallant actions, Hickenlooper and his 5th Ohio Battery were Mentioned in Despatches by two Division Commanders in their Shiloh After-action reports [OR 10 p.250 (Sherman) and page 280 (Prentiss)]. Andrew Hickenlooper. One of those iconic names (in company with Wallace, Prentiss, Peabody and Johnston), always to find association with the Battle of Shiloh. So imagine my surprise to discover there was another Andrew Hickenlooper at Shiloh. This other Andrew even came to the attention of Artillery Captain Andrew, just after 10am while the 5th Ohio Battery was readying itself for its next action in the Hornet's Nest. Captain Hickenlooper reports: "It was during one of these temporary lulls (after the first attack) that General Grant and staff, surrounded by a detachment of 5th Ohio Cavalry as his bodyguard, approached our position. His presence was interesting to me, but incomparably less so than the unexpected appearance in his escort of Andrew Hickenlooper, whom I supposed was back at home in Ohio. We had time for a moment's recognition before they rode away, and I turned again to join in the serious business of the day." [MOLLUS (Ohio) page 431.] This other Andrew Hickenlooper was 65 years old and joined the 5th Ohio Cavalry as a Saddler, merely for the opportunity to be close to his son, who commanded the 5th Ohio Battery. [To find out what happened to Andrew Hickenlooper, Sr., you can read the article for yourself, from Page 432.] Ozzy References: http://suvcw.org/mollus/war/OHv5.htm MOLLUS (Ohio) Volume 5, Sketches of War History guide http://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=mdp.39015042015092;view=2up;seq=500;size=300 Capt Hickenlooper (p.479) http://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=uiug.30112047586075;view=1up;seq=290 Saddler Hickenlooper, Co. G (p.277) [note age] http://archive.org/stream/sketcheswarhist01unkngoog#page/n4/mode/2up Sketches, MOLLUS (Ohio) vol.5 pages 402-483 (Battle of Shiloh parts 1 and 2 by Brevet BGen Andrew Hickenlooper published 1903) Sketches of War History. Letter of Andrew Hickenlooper (April 11th 1862) at above link: MOLLUS (Ohio) vol.5 page 435-6.
  20. 38th Tennessee diary

    The 8th Tennessee (Looney's) had a convoluted beginning: initiated in September 1861, the infantry regiment was ineptly utilized by High Command (somehow failed to get significant assignments, i.e., "fell through the cracks.") Following loss of the substantial Confederate force at Fort Donelson, there arrived an urgency to "get men from any- and every-where" and the 38th Tennessee was organized from the core of the 8th Tennessee... and the unit's first significant action was Shiloh. This diary was written by John D. Thomas of Memphis, recruited to the 38th Tennessee on March 6th 1862. Written over the course of three days in July 1862, while he was camped near Tupelo, this work could better be described as a "thoughtful memory," or "a letter never sent." Detailed and descriptive, the diary is noteworthy for: description of Memphis & Charleston Railroad in March 1862 (required three days to travel by rail from Memphis to Jackson, Tennessee) impression of General PGT Beauregard by men-in-ranks; "We were transported to the most miserable town of Corinth" [page 6] "After helping build fortifications at Corinth, our orders arrived..." pages 10-12 describe Thomas' experience at Shiloh Day 1, including 38th Tennessee involvement in capture of General Prentiss; pages 12-13 discuss Day 2, and the two-day slog back to Corinth through knee-deep mud; page 14 mentions the evacuation of Corinth on May 28th, and Thomas' elevation to Brigade Ordnance Sergeant. Only 15 pages long, this diary contains detail not found anywhere else. (Another gem introduced by David "Ole Miss") Ozzy References: http://clio.lib.olemiss.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/civil_war/id/2803/rec/1 John D. Thomas' diary http://familysearch.org/wiki/en/38th_Regiment,_Tennessee_Infantry_(Looney's)_(8th_Infantry) History of 38th Tennessee http://tngenweb.org/civilwar/38th-tennessee-infantry-regiment/ 38th Tennessee (accurate except regiment organized March vice May 1862)
  21. Ancestor Veterans (CSA)

    Let's start with Texas... There were three units from the Lone Star State, engaged at the Battle of Shiloh. The best sites I have uncovered, for beginning research on ancestors: http://www.nps.gov/civilwar/soldiers-and-sailors-database.htm (For all Texas soldiers, but especially those from the 2nd Texas Infantry Regiment: NPS Soldier and Sailor System. Input your ancestor's last name, along with his regiment number, and select <Show Results> ) http://gen.1starnet.com/civilwar/9thmain.htm (For 9th Texas Infantry, Scroll down to roster. Website provided by Ron Brothers and Tim Bell.) http://www.keathleywebs.com/terrysrangers/ (For 8th Texas Cavalry, aka 'Terry's Texas Rangers.' Website provided by keathleywebs.com) Ozzy
  22. Libby Prison, second only to Andersonville in the North for notoriety, was dismantled, brick by brick; and in a program emulated eighty years later at Lake Havasu, Arizona (involving London Bridge), the pieces were hauled halfway across the country by rail, and re-assembled in Chicago, in time for the Columbian Exposition of 1893, where it may have drawn more visitors than the Ferris Wheel. Maybe you already knew that... Unknown to most, is the connection to the Battle of Shiloh. Very few, if any, Federal prisoners taken during April 1862 at Shiloh were interred at Libby. However, in October 1862, the remaining Shiloh prisoners, two hundred officers and eight hundred enlisted men, on their way north 'on parole,' were halted at Libby for a day or two, to compare and confirm their 'descriptions' in the Prisoner Roll against their physical presence. Libby seems to have functioned as a 'clearing house,' the final check before Union men were permitted to complete the final hike: thirteen miles to the 'flag-of-truce' boat, John A. Warner, waiting for its precious cargo at Aiken's Landing. (It is believed tens of thousands of Federal prisoners passed through Libby during its years of operation.) For an informative, engaging four-minute video about Libby in Chicago, see <interactive.wttw.com/timemachine/libby-prison-and-coliseum> (found on the internet at 'Chicago Time Machine Libby') Other information from Wikipedia and A Perfect Picture of Hell (Genoways) 2001. Ozzy
  23. On the morning of the 6th of April, Sergeant Seymour Thompson was a twenty-year old member of 3rd Iowa, Company F, eating breakfast with his messmates, when the growing sound and increasing frequency of musket fire to the south and southwest became concerning. But with the booming of not-so-distant artillery, there was no mistake: the Federal camp at Pittsburg Landing was under attack. The long roll trilled and SGT Thompson joined his fellows in ranks for the march south to aid General Prentiss' 6th Division... but General Stephen Hurlbut halted his men well short of Prentiss' camps -- made aware of that Division's disintegration by the swelling stream of wide-eyed skeddadlers racing north -- and Sergeant Thompson and the rest of the 3rd Iowa found themselves arranged in a line of blue, stretching roughly east-west across a cotton field. And not long after the stragglers thinned out a bit, Thompson caught his first sight of the enemy: "The Rebel regiments with their red banners flashing in the morning sun marched proudly and all undisturbed through the abandoned camps of Prentiss. To the enemy's surprise, suddenly appeared our line of blue, widely deployed upon the open field, the ground sloping towards him, and not a brush to conceal us from his view: a single blue line, compact and firm, crowned with a hedge of sparkling bayonets, our flags and banners flapping in the breeze. And in our center a battery of six guns, whose dark mouths scowled defiance at him. "The enemy's infantry fronted towards us and stood. Ours kneeled and brought their pieces to the ready... Thus for some moments, the antagonists surveyed each other... until a regiment on our left opened fire, and the other regiments got caught up, and the fire was carried along the entire line..." Thus relates Seymour Thompson his initiation into the Battle of Shiloh in his 1864 book, Recollections with the 3rd Iowa Regiment. Nearly forty pages of this 400-page history are devoted to arrival at Pittsburg Landing and subsequent battle. The first hundred pages relate the forming of the regiment (and trouble arising from the political "selection" of Colonel from outside the regiment, in opposition to the usual practice of vote of members); and everything one could ever want to know about guarding railroads in northern Missouri. The book concludes with Thompson's discussion of 3rd Iowa's disastrous participation in the Battle of Jackson, Mississippi in July 1863. Because only two years passed between Battle of Shiloh and publication of the book, many unexpected insights and revelations are included IRT how that battle was fought; what chance the Confederates had of winning; and observations of early-career U.S. Grant, W.T. Sherman and John Pope. And Stephen Hurlbut comes in for criticism early on (during operations in Missouri); but over the course of Days 1 and 2 at Shiloh, Hurlbut experiences a transcendence in the view of the author, and most of the men of the 4th Division. Available at archive.org (free site for out-of-copyright books). Ozzy http://archive.org/stream/recollectionswit00thomp#page/n3/mode/2up N.B. SDG member, Hank, first made mention of this work by Lieutenant Thompson several months ago... but I only just got around to it.
  24. There are some exceptional "tall tales" to be found in the Official Records of the Civil War, and we all have our favourites... But I would be hard-pressed to find a more bare-faced contrived furphy than the one expressed by General William Tecumseh Sherman on April 10th 1862 in his after-action report IRT the Battle of Shiloh. Included at the bottom of page 253 of OR 10, Sherman asserts: "The enemy captured seven of our guns on Sunday, but on Monday we recovered seven guns -- not the identical guns we had lost, but enough in numbers to balance the account." Confirmed by examination of the record, Sherman's Fifth Division had been assigned the following artillery (lost guns in parenthesis): Waterhouse (3) Taylor (0) Behr (5) On its face, this is a minor mistake: total of 8 artillery pieces actually lost, as against seven reported by Sherman as lost. However, it must be remembered that Waterhouse was forced to abandon a gun during one of his northerly movements. So the total becomes... 9. And allowance must be given for the combined operations that commenced with MGen McClernand's offer of assistance before 8am. Initially, BGen Sherman requested only a squadron of cavalry with which to conduct surveillance; but that quickly expanded into a request for support from the First Division. And McClernand provided that support, initially via separately directed troop movements and actions; but following on the assembly (and collapse) of the 2nd Line along the Hamburg-Purdy Road at about 10:30am the operations of the 5th Division and 1st Division become practically indistinguishable. And this "incorporation" of two distinct Army divisions into the "Sherman & McClernand Joint operation" is cemented further through the employment of Major Ezra Taylor, who began the day as Sherman's Chief of Artillery; but who assumed control of the employment of artillery of the 1st Division after 10:30am. That said, Taylor cannot be given blame for the disaster that befell Jerome Burrows and his 14th Ohio Battery (all six guns lost about 10:30 due to concerted effort of SAM Woods' Brigade.) But Major Taylor admits (OR 10 page 274) "taking responsibility for ordering two guns of Schwartz into position" (one gun lost.) And on page 275: "Dresser's Battery (Captain Timony) was put in battery under my direction on Sunday... in front of General McClernand's HQ" (four guns lost.) [General McClernand admits to maintaining control of McAllister's Battery; so its loss of one gun, captured by the 4th Tennessee, is attributable to him.] Therefore, the total number of guns lost by Sherman (or agents of Sherman) on April 6th stands at 14. Ozzy References: OR pages as sited DW Reed's Battle of Shiloh and the Organizations Engaged (1903) pages 91-101.
  25. The full quote: "A kind of wild excitement seized me and my comrades, and we would rush forward, thinking of ourselves as Invincible." This is how Private Thomas Keen described being in battle, in company with his fellows and with bullets flying all around. Found in I thought it my Duty to Go: the Civil War Letters of Thomas Keen (1838-1908) of the 1st Nebraska Infantry, edited by James E. Potter, and made available by the Nebraska Historical Society. Twenty-three letters from August 1861 (one month after the 1st Nebraska was mustered into service at Omaha) until 1864 (when Keen was mustered out at Hickory Street Hospital in St Louis), covering duty in Missouri, Tennessee, Mississippi, Arkansas, and back to Missouri. Of interest, because Keen vividly describes the action of Colonel Thayer's Nebraska Regiment at Fort Donelson; and the role of the 1st Nebraska in overcoming the Confederate break-out attempt (pages 138-141, in a letter to his parents; and another letter to his sister.) There is also a Letter of 25 March 1862 from Crump's Landing (of interest because Keen indicates the Army is under command of General C.F. Smith: shows how the word failed to trickle down to the troops.) Two letters from May 1862 reporting the action of the 1st Nebraska during Day 2 at Shiloh. And a surprising series of letters sent from Paducah and Corinth (late May to early June 1862), wherein Keen describes his 'detached duty at Paducah for Signals training.' (However, after he and his fellows were trained for duty with the Signal Corps, and reported for duty at Corinth, General Halleck ordered the Corps disbanded; and the men were returned to their former units...) Available here: http://www.nebraskahistory.org/publish/publicat/history/full-text/NH2000MyDuty.pdf (Letters of Private Thomas Keen, 1st Nebraska Infantry) Ozzy
×