lelliott19

Location of the Michie / Mickey House?

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Great find Ozzy! Thank you so much for your continued research on my behalf. I really appreciate your help. Were you able to determine the date of the Skirmish at Mickeys Ridge? 

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Skirmish at Mickey's Ridge... I've seen two dates mentioned, so still do not know: either, or,... possibly both.

 

April 10th, 1862 and April 24th, 1862.

 

 

Ozzy

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The Ridge road came out of Corinth and ran along some high ground towards the Shiloh Battlefield area and when it crossed the Monterey road (I believe) it became the Bark road which ran east along the top of the ridge running along this road.  This ridge is the highest elevations on the Shiloh plateau and the battlefield area.  The Bark road connects with the Hamburg road.  It was the route that Withers' and two of his brigades took on the morning of Sunday April 6th , east from the Eastern Corinth road to the south bank of the Locust Grove ravine where they attacked Stewart's union brigade camped along the Savannah-Hamburg road.  

As to burials, more soldiers were buried at the hospital site at Mackie's as this was on the road taken by the army in their retreat to Corinth.  They lightened their loads here by leaving wounded soldiers in the charge of the doctors while dead soldiers were left for burial.  At the site of the Battlefield of Fallen timbers, some burials happened near the site of Dr. Lyle's hospital as it was not the main hospital, set back somewhat from the road.  In this local scene of fighting between the armies, Mackie's was the main hospital and burial site while Fallen Timbers was the secondary of both.

Ron      

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Larry DeBerry of Shiloh Tours (731-926-0360) was kind enough to take me this afternoon to the place where, some

40 years ago, he was told where the farmhouse sat, where Chambers Store Road meets Michie Pebble Hill Rd. (Hy 224).

Yahoo maps: https://maps.yahoo.com/place/?lat=35.0994938518323&lon=-88.42364430427551&q=38376&t=h&bb=35.10096852%2C-88.4267047%2C35.09801916%2C-88.4205839&addr=38376

The farmhouse is in front of the house at the top of the map.

post-24-0-93626500-1424899575_thumb.jpg

The farmhouse sat on top of this hill, in front of where the modern house sits now. Looking around, I can see by the terrain where the two ridges the roads ran that met here are.

Here is Larry standing about where the house stood:

post-24-0-04484200-1424899785_thumb.jpg

Somewhere around the 1960's the house was moved acrross Hy 224 to this little hill:

post-24-0-20317800-1424900002_thumb.jpg

For anyone interested, this sits on the property:

post-24-0-56260200-1424900059_thumb.jpg

Jim

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Good sleuthing Jim and Larry!  Great photos!

 

THE MANASSAS BELLE

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Jim, thanks a bunch, to you and Larry both! Or at least thanks a beer! ;) 

 

I had written Tim Smith about this a few days ago, and he located the house on that same property. So I'd say we have a consensus. :)

 

Did Larry indicate that it was the wartime house that was moved across the street in the 1960's? And in the picture where he's standing on the site of the old house, are you standing in the drive, with the modern-day house to your right? Just trying to get oriented. Thanks again for your help, and tell Larry we said the same! 

 

Perry

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Actually, Larry forced (He twisted my arm, I swear!) me to go to the local watering hole Wed. evening and I bought the first round on you, so you now owe me two beers.

The house is just to my right and Larry is standing in the front yard of the new house in the pic. It was the war time house that was moved across the street.

Jim

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WOW!!!!! Thanks Jim and Larry! You guys are awesome!

 

When I went last Fall, I was directed by NPS staff to the location across 224 (on the "grassy knoll" surrounded by the scrub pines) where Larry indicated the farm house had been moved to. That is where I was standing when I mentioned the feeling that the ground just wasnt right. I kept looking across the street thinking that it must have been 'over there' somewhere. Thank you sooooooo much for tracking it down for me. You dont know and I cant even say how much it means to me, but Im sure for those here, you all likely understand. 

 

Cant wait for my next trip to Shiloh! Thanks again for everyone's generosity and willingness to help. Awesome! just plain awesome!

Laura

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You're welcome Laura. I believe I know how thrilling finding this is to you. I know that when I find even a little scrap of info on the 16th Wi I get a tingle all the way to my toes. Glad to be of assistance.

Jim

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Two beers? Man, prices are going up! 

 

Laura, you could always rent out a room to SDG members when they visit, to help pay off the mortgage on that house. That way you could own it free and clear in a matter of a few decades. ;)

 

I'm glad we got the location nailed down for you. That's pretty special. 

 

Perry

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Thanks to everyone who helped with locating the precise spot! When I am able to go up there, Ill take a picture on the spot with the gg grandfather's fleam/blood letting device.  :D I don't know if he actually had it with him there.....I kind of doubt it. I'd guess that it was an unnecessary instrument as there was plenty of 'blood letting' without the help of the doctors. 

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Laura

 

Still not successful at finding a drawing or photo of Mickey's House, while it yet existed. But, I've encountered names of three sketch artists who were present at Shiloh, either during the Battle, or within days afterwards: Henri Lovie, Alfred E. Mathews and Edwin Forbes. Together, they generated several dozen drawings that were used by Harper's Weekly, Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, or self-published after the war.

 

Perry, Jim and Bjorn discussed the works of Henri Lovie in 2013, on this site, in a topic labelled 'Drawings' (in Shiloh on the Web, as part of 'Back to the Future.') In that earlier discussion, Jim posted three sketches by Lovie, the third of which was most likely done within a few miles of Mickey's House (titled Advance of the Federal Troops on Corinth.) The NPS may have access to more works, if you happen to be visiting a National Military Park in the near future...

 

Cheers

 

Ozzy

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Thanks Ozzy. We are actually leaving at 6 in the am to head to Shiloh so Ill ask while there if there are extant images or sketches.

 

I plan to try to stand on the spot of the Mickey House tomrrow or Sunday. Ill take a picture and post to this thread when I get back!!!!

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Laura

 

Hope your visit to Shiloh and surrounds is everything you want it to be.

 

Safe travels...

 

Ozzy

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Thanks Ozzy! It was great.

 

I posted an after action report on the "2015 Battlefield Hikes in Adobe format" thread

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Laura

 

How did you go with the site of Mickey's White House? (All photos welcome.)   :)

 

 

Ozzy

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lelliott19,  it’s June of 2017 and this post is 2015.  I believe the hospital at Pebble Hill, aka Mickey’s House, you talk of is where the Williams Family lived, per family history. A story about this place is told many times to several branches of my family by John Williams, son of Thomas and Dorcus Williams.  John must have been there or saw the aftermath.  While my grandmother, his granddaughter, Pearl Williams James sat on his lap, John tells her the story of his house being used as a hospital. Then adds arms and legs were piled up as high as the windows to keep bullet from coming through the walls. Was this a scary story?

In the late 1960’s Pearl (Ma James) would tell me this. Forty years later and thirty year after Pearl dies, I meet other Williams Family members at a reunion, who I have never met.  Standing at the graves of John and America Williams, in the Pebble Hill Cemetery, they offer up the same story.  I’m told to turn around and they pointed out were the house/hospital sat at the road intersection.

 The census has Thomas Henry Williams, wife Dorcus McAfee Williams and family living near there in 1860. This is including John. They are share-cropper on the census. I believe the home and land being farmed is owned by the Mickey Family and this place.  The Civil War Map attached shows the Williams home in May of 1862.  Both these supports the location of the Williams home on April 6th and after of 1862.

 I was sent the map by someone years ago and they could not scan the whole map.  So I had to put it together.  I have Goggle Earth’ed, Google Map’ed and other things and this place always shows to be at the intersection everyone talks of. I hope someday to find the complete map.

  Later John and America will buy this house and land from G. G. Michie in 1877. The deed is unclear and did not pin point the location. But for my grandmother to be setting on his lap looking at the wall where the arms and legs were, it would have to be. She was born 1896 and to be big enough to understand and remember the story she would have to be – What six years old? And having other family members who live in the area say that’s it. That’s it for me. John lives until 1915. All this supports the story and it appears he loved telling it and/or scaring his grandchildren. This story has stayed for the most part the same whoever re-tells it.  The truth? Has to be.  The house? Has to be.  

Thoughts Anyone?

McNairy PCS Map 1862 - Copy.png

 

Williams Pebble Hill 2.jpg

Williams Pebble Hill 1.jpg

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10 hours ago, Lynn James said:

John tells her the story of his house being used as a hospital. Then adds arms and legs were piled up as high as the windows to keep bullet from coming through the walls. 

Hi Lynn. Thanks so much for your reply and for sharing the stories of your family on the site. I'm sure there is some truth to the limbs being piled outside the windows, but likely more for convenience sake than to shield the men inside from bullets. The surgeons typically performed operations inside buildings when there was one, but I've read numerous accounts that they disposed of the amputated limbs in the most disturbing way - by simply tossing them out the window. Seems really gruesome to us today, but I imagine it was the quickest way to get them out of the way, so they could do their job as rapidly as possible.

The Mickey House was the Brigade Hospital for Sterling Alexander Martin (S.A.M.) Wood's Brigade (and possibly other brigades of Hardee's III Corps.) I don't know how big the house was - do you have a photo of it?    - but  Wood's brigade had about 600 wounded. After the operations were performed the wounded were quartered in barns, outbuildings, tents, or on the grounds.

If 80% (low estimate) of the 600 wounded required treatment at the brigade hospital, that was 480 men needing treatment. There were four Surgeons and Asst Surgeons - Dr Cross (my 2x g grandfather) Dr Noblitt 44th TN, Dr. Lawrence and Dr. Chandler - so, if they divided the work equally, that's 120 wounded each (!)

From Dr Noblitt's account, we know that three of the Drs worked all night (all except Chandler) and did not sleep for 48 hours. Dr Noblitt wrote that 65 wounded were transported back to Corinth by wagon on Tuesday. Some of the less seriously wounded likely made their way back on foot. The most seriously wounded, and those who had been operated on, would not have been moved for fear of worsening their condition. Those would have been left behind and taken prisoner when the hospital was captured.

Please let me know if you or anyone in your family has a picture of the house. I would love to see what it looked like! Thanks again for your reply. 

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I will see what photos they have on the house.  What are your thought on my findings? Am I talking about the house history calls the Mickey House?

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13 hours ago, Lynn James said:

I will see what photos they have on the house.  What are your thought on my findings? Am I talking about the house history calls the Mickey House?

Thank you sooooo very much! I would love to see a picture of the house! Yes I believe you are talking about the correct structure. Did you see the post above about the house having been relocated? Let me see if I can embed it here:

 

On 2/25/2015 at 3:36 PM, WI16thJim said:

Larry DeBerry of Shiloh Tours (731-926-0360) was kind enough to take me this afternoon to the place where, some

40 years ago, he was told where the farmhouse sat, where Chambers Store Road meets Michie Pebble Hill Rd. (Hy 224).

Yahoo maps: https://maps.yahoo.com/place/?lat=35.0994938518323&lon=-88.42364430427551&q=38376&t=h&bb=35.10096852%2C-88.4267047%2C35.09801916%2C-88.4205839&addr=38376

The farmhouse is in front of the house at the top of the map.

post-24-0-93626500-1424899575_thumb.jpg

The farmhouse sat on top of this hill, in front of where the modern house sits now. Looking around, I can see by the terrain where the two ridges the roads ran that met here are.

Here is Larry standing about where the house stood:

post-24-0-04484200-1424899785_thumb.jpg

Somewhere around the 1960's the house was moved acrross Hy 224 to this little hill:

post-24-0-20317800-1424900002_thumb.jpg

Local historians state that the house was originally located across Hwy 224, due North of the location you were shown. And that it was moved to the location you were probably shown (atop the grassy knoll with the scrub pines?) sometime in 1960's (yes I meant 1960's not 1860's) If that is true, and I have no reason to doubt, then, at the time of the Battle, the house would have been located in the front yard of the modern brick house in the first picture.

If you locate a picture PLEASE share it here. I would be ever grateful to have a photo of one of the places where my 2x great grandfather was 155 years ago! and I am probably not the only one who would be very interested to see what the Mickey House looked like! Thanks so much for your help.

Laura

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Laura

In my available moments, I have searched the works of every sketch artist (contemporary to Battle of Shiloh) and diagrams/photos of veteran reunions... with no luck on "Mickey's White House at the crossroads" as yet.  It is possible some Southern soldier sketched the place on his way north, April 5th; or a Federal soldier (with McClernand) may have sketched the house during Halleck's Crawl to Corinth. Diary or letter yet to be found.

Same with the "Everett Tree" near the Camp of the 6th Division: no idea if it still thrives, or when it might have been removed. I ran across a sketch of that tree with it's markings a couple of years ago, and am having trouble remembering what resource I encountered that sketch in (not a photograph, so the sketch you have uncovered -- and the "illustrated letters" revealed by Rbn3 -- are better than what I have, at the moment.)

One other thought IRT Mickey's ...it may have been moved to the south side of the road to avoid being "next to the cemetery."  A lot of folks in Iowa and Illinois (where I'm from) have issues with living too close to burial grounds.

All the best

Ozzy

 

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Was attempting a different method of searching for "Shiloh Battlefield sketches" today, and ended up on a Library of Congress site, with the collected works of a member of the 32nd Indiana Infantry (under General Buell's Army of the Ohio.) The man appears to have created sketches nearly everywhere he went; the attached image is titled "Mississippi State Line near Corinth, April 1862" [by Adolph Metzner.]  By comparison with a map made by Colonel George Thom in May 1862 the buildings in Metzner's sketch should belong to "S. Cohn." However, if Metzner's date (April 1862) is correct, the house in his sketch is a lot further north...

Corinth road.png

Just an example of what is still out there, left to be discovered...

Ozzy

 

 

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