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Rbn3

Captain Patrick Gregg, M.D. in Shiloh Context

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I am working on a biography of Dr. Patrick Gregg of Rock Island, Illinois. He was Captain of K Company of the 58th Illinois and was captured with Prentiss. His post  POW career was with the 23rd Illinois as its Surgeon.  The attached file is an attempt to give context to Gregg's Shiloh's personal experience there. Critique and corrections are welcome.

 

Biography of Patrick Gregg p1-9 Context.pdf

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Rbn3

Any time I learn something new and significant, I am impressed. I was caught up in the narrative from the first page, and enjoyed the comparison of Shiloh to the 1781 Battle of Cowpens (and found the transition smooth from discussion of the Civil War Battle to explanation of the Revolutionary War engagement. And there are benefits to this connection, with the 250th Anniversary of American Revolution happening now.) The style of footnotes used is not distracting; and the extent of research is evident.

The misfortune experienced by Colonel Lynch (probably the last chance for Federal defenders to avoid capture after fighting all day) is well explained. And the introduction of Oscar Malmborg -- with his archaic tactics and tenuous grasp of the English language -- highlights yet another Shiloh character deserving of recognition. And as for Patrick Gregg: I have long believed Dr. Gregg's performance after Shiloh to be deserving of the highest recognition... even to late-award of the Congressional Medal of Honor.

Can't wait to see the rest of the story...

All the best

Ozzy

 

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Ozzy, " with the 250th Anniversary of American Revolution happening now"  American Revolution 1775-1783. Won't be on a 250th anniversary till 2025.

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The Townshend Acts were passed in 1767 - that was the start of the whole thing. Unless you count the Stamp Act. On the other hand I prefer starting with the Treaty of Paris  of 1763 since that was when the English started piling on Colonial taxes to pay their 7 Years War debt. 

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Returning to Patrick Gregg...

Having grown up in a community with no "Gregg Primary School," or "Gregg Park" or "Gregg Street," ...it was refreshing for me to see that Patrick Gregg finally achieved a bit of recognition in his adopted hometown:

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-Do65Ohw9Rcg/UODwGRgmj8I/AAAAAAAAAOE/t8vNQ7GBkWg/s1600/goodyear.jpg 

[Shaw-Hellige Mural in Rock Island, posted on Google Images by goodyear.jpg with an elderly Patrick Gregg third from left in back row.]

Ozzy

 

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Rbn3

Hope the Patrick Gregg Project is progressing IAW your expectations. I have run across few sources over recent weeks, but after placing "rock island arsenal patrick gregg" in Search Box on Google, encountered information about Dr. Gregg not widely known. The sources:

http://archive.org/stream/historicalencyclill02bate#page/n5/mode/2up  Historical Encyclopedia of Illinois (1914) -- Rock Island.  This reference looked promising, but holds scant reference to Patrick Gregg (pages 841, 875 and 976). Most disappointing: the exhaustive Biography Section, beginning page 991, contains no entry. [However, mention is made of Pierce Barber on page 979... more on him, later.]

 http://www.rigov.org/DocumentCenter/View/1118  Walking tour of Rock Island neighborhoods: Chicago Addition. Stop Number 1 is the former home of Dr. Patrick Gregg (house still standing in 1992.) Brief, slightly inaccurate biography included.

Belvidere Standard newspaper (of Belvidere, Illinois) edition of August 11th 1886. Reports retirement of Dr. Gregg as Post Surgeon at Rock Island Arsenal after more than twenty years of continuous service.

http://www.qconline.com/editorials/couple-traces-history-of-a-port-byron-founder/article_c8c0aac0-155c-5a14-8820-89b9ff675b19.html  2013 article reporting the connection of Dr. Patrick Gregg to Port Byron, Illinois. Although Gregg's connection to Rock Island County is known, this 1830s residence in Port Byron offers opportunity to find significant resources IRT the doctor. [Port Byron was a "boom town" upriver from Rock Island that was seen as potential shipyard for building paddle steamers. Pierce Barber built the first steamer there in 1844; and many Port Byron-built passenger steamers saw service during the Civil War.]

http://portbyronil.com/history/   Port Byron Historical Society.

http://www.rivervalleylibrary.org/historicalsociety.asp  Port Byron Library contact details. [As a former Library worker, recommend asking about "vertical file" records on Patrick Gregg. Most Illinois libraries created/maintained vertical files (collections of local history) that cannot be found anywhere else.]

Vertical files. Because Patrick Gregg had connections with City of Rock Island and Davenport, Iowa, it would be worthwhile to contact the main city library of those two places and enquire about Patrick Gregg. In addition, Rock Island Arsenal maintains a Post Library (of unclassified information) which most likely contains information on Post Surgeon Patrick Gregg.

Finally, here is Patrick Gregg at find-a-grave:  http://findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi/http%22//fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=168446947 

All the best

Ozzy

 

 

 

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Thanks for all the good stuff! Did you notice that the Prof of Surgery at Jefferson was the Little Mac's father? Gregg wisely decided to spiff up his resume by attending two lecture courses at Jefferson, a controversial proprietary institution that was fought tooth and nail by U Penn. It was actually chartered as a division of the old Washington and Jefferson College located in western Penn  near Pittsburgh. Gregg must have done the required apprenticeship (usually 3 years) in Ireland and probably attended one of the small proprietary schools in Dublin where he did his "anatomy". There, as here, grave robbers were major, if unofficial, members of the faculty.  Somewhat curiously, there briefly was a medical school in Rock Island about 1850 chartered by the University of Wisconsin! It moved to Rock Island from St. Charles, Illinois, where the anatomy prof had been shot by an mob angry over a grave robbery.  The school moved to Davenport after its year in Rock Island and then subsequently to Keokuk, where it ultimately morphed into the University of Iowa School of Medicine.

Gregg's father, John, was the victim of an assassination attempt in Ireland, probably because he had been a member of the Protestant yeomanry militia loyal to England during the rising of 1798.* John and the family fled to western New York just over the border from Penn. Patrick Gregg, John Emerson, and Henry Crawford (surgeon of the 58th Illinois) were all Irish Protestant physicians who never joined a church in America. All three of their families had experienced the effects of civil war in Ireland.

*see: http://www.historyireland.com/18th-19th-century-history/a-forgotten-army-the-irish-yeomanry/

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this is very interesting article...i tried to like it but a message popped up saying i can only "like" 10 posts per 4 hr hour period...i had not liked 10 yet..has anybody ever come upon that?

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Mona

Every once in a while, I must hit a "forbidden key" and lose some ability or other on SDG site. (Have experienced two brief periods where adding "Like" was not permitted; one fourteen day period last year I could not post anything at all.) But it seems to self-correct after a few days.

Cheers

Ozzy

 

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Rbn3

Found another newspaper article (Rock Island Argus of Tuesday, July 27th 1886, page 4) that reveals interesting detail about termination of Dr. Gregg's service at Rock Island Arsenal as Post Surgeon. Titled, "Why so much Nonsense?" the brief contribution seems to indicate political reasons for ending Patrick Gregg's tenure. A shame, because more sensitivity should have been exercised in the retirement of this loyal, untiring servant of the community.

http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn92053944/1886-07-27/ed-1/seq-4/#date1=1886&index=0&rows=20&words=Gregg&searchType=basic&sequence=0&state=Illinois&date2=1886&proxtext=Gregg&y=0&x=0&dateFilterType=yearRange&page=1

Ozzy

N.B.  In case the link is broken, the article is at Chronicling America (the Library of Congress site.)

 

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I have searched through on-line archives of the Quad City papers and saw the pieces about Gregg's retirement. He also had a spat with the Davenport medical community and most of his Rock Island colleagues about a decade prior over an outbreak of water borne dysentery in Rock Island. Gregg got a bit carried away in the defense of his home town when it seemed quite apparent that the Rock Island municipal water supply was the culprit. The Arsenal position was a nice plum but Gregg did not complain about his retirement at least in print that I have seen. He also had helped out at the POW prison on Rock Island during his time between his own return to Rock Island in 1862 and when he joined the 23rd Illinois as its surgeon.

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Wonder if the "Irish temper" is what kept him out of the "Historical Encyclopedia of Illinois?"

Ozzy

 

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He was a man of many facets. He collected the $200 bounty for going to Wisconsin to apprehend and bring back one of Col. Davenport's killers. He then received his body for "science" after the murderer was convicted and then hanged in the Rock Island square. Attached is his last recruiting ad in the Argus.

Recruiting notice Argus Jan 1862.JPG

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Rbn3

Thanks for posting the above article of January 1862. The more one researches the life of Patrick Gregg, the more one appreciates the boundless energy and drive and determination of the man... who seems to have accomplished more in his 82 years than most men could achieve in four lifetimes. While investigating Rock Island connections to Dr. Gregg, I am struck by "artificial divides" that seem to have been constructed, separating "Old settlers," Civil War participants, and "Golden Age movers and shakers" into distinct categories. Over time, the only Old settlers to enjoy community recognition were George Davenport, Antoine LeClaire, John Deere and Chief Blackhawk. Local Civil War participants were rarely discussed (with focus on far-flung battles in the East substituting for local involvement. Example: I never heard of Battles of Wilson's Creek or Pea Ridge until long after my school days; and then by accident. Yet those engagements, as well as Shiloh, involved local soldiers.)

Perhaps Patrick Gregg became cantankerous in old age; fell out of favor. Whatever the cause, it was the community's loss.

Just a ramble...

Ozzy

 

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I hope to soon post a piece I am working on about Dr. Gregg and Dr. John Emerson, owner of Dred Scott. Gregg was summoned by Emerson when the latter was dying in 1843 in Davenport. Gregg witnessed Emerson's will at the LeClaire Hotel, where Emerson and his wife and child were living while they built a brick house close by. The Irish background of the two doctors was remarkably similar. They also crossed paths as Emerson was leaving the rotting Fort Armstrong for Fort Snelling and Gregg was arriving in Rock Island in the spring of 1836.

In 1951 the Rock Island Medical Society published a 50 year history. It was dedicated to Dr. Patrick Gregg, though it does not contain much info about him.

In 1879 John Gregg, the drill master and Patrick's son, was indicted and convicted of embezzling money from the U S Post Office in Chicago. I will post the details when I organize them. John was pardoned by Rutherford B Hays and went on to live a successful life. He may have taken a hit for his brother in law General John McArthur, the post master, who was also indicted, convicted and pardoned. John transferred from the 12th Illinois that had been formed by McArthur in the summer of 1861 to Patrick Gregg's company of the 58th in December of 1861 by order of General Halleck. After being a POW John became McArthur's aide-de-camp. Some of John's old 12th comrades were also captured at Shiloh.

McArthur was a competent Brigade commander who was stellar at Nashville. 


 

 

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