Perry Cuskey

Name that Road

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This is a picture I took at Shiloh last fall. Who wants to take a crack at naming where it is? Here's a kinda sorta hint: It's not the Sunken Road. :) 

20170319_131322.jpg

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I go with the Corinth Road at the south end of the park.

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That's a good guess Hank, but it's not the Corinth Road.

I'll give another hint this evening if no one figures it out. 

 

 

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Perry

Unless my eyes are playing tricks on me again, there is an obelisque at the end of this quiet lane (symbolic of Indiana, a few Ohio, and one or two Tennessee monuments.) Otherwise, the leaf covered pathway presents as devoid of markers, memorials and munitions.

A possible observation

Ozzy

 

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13 hours ago, Ozzy said:

Perry

Unless my eyes are playing tricks on me again, there is an obelisque at the end of this quiet lane (symbolic of Indiana, a few Ohio, and one or two Tennessee monuments.) Otherwise, the leaf covered pathway presents as devoid of markers, memorials and munitions.

A possible observation

Ozzy

 

Ozzy, this one is kind of tricky. It's hard to tell, but there are no monuments along this particular road. Well actually there is one, but it's a fair distance behind me in this picture. 

Another hint below. :)

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1 hour ago, WI16thJim said:

Beauregard Road.

 

That's what I would probably guess if I didn't know otherwise, Jim. 

Here's another hint, and this one might give it away - think Yanks instead of Rebs. :)

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Hamburg Savannah Rd before you drop off into the Owl Creek bottom?

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We have a winner! :)

Hamburg-Savannah Road it is. The 'catch' about the picture is that, as Mona guessed, it's from the section of the road north of Highway 22, between there and Snake Creek. It's technically inside the park, but since it's across the highway from the rest of the park, and blocked by a gate to keep vehicles out, I doubt it gets many visitors. In fact, this was the first time I had ever been over there myself. Michele and I walked along it maybe half-a-mile or so before turning around near that downed tree across the road. And like I told Jim, I probably would have guessed it to be Beauregard Road if I didn't already know what it was. So congrats to Mona - she's now officially the River Road Queen. ;) 

Here's a screenshot from Google Maps. The red circle near the top shows the approximate location of the picture. 

River Road.jpg

 

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I forgot to mention, even though it's kind of obvious - but Lew Wallace and his men traveled down this stretch of road on their famous (or infamous) march to the battlefield on April 6th, after crossing Snake Creek. You're looking north in the picture, so their line of march would have been toward the camera. 

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Well Done, Mona!

And thanks to Perry for "pointing out the obvious" ...because it required half an hour for me to confirm your claim that "Lew Wallace brought his 3rd Division down that lane (modern-day Hamburg-Savannah Road)."  But after comparing the Thompson Map of 1900 to the present road network, the claim is indeed true: modern Hamburg-Savannah Road runs east of Glover Branch (old Tilghman Branch) as it should.

So much road aligning and "straightening" of water courses has taken place since the Battle of Shiloh, it is difficult to pinpoint some historic locations with present-day maps. The loss of Owl Creek Bridge prevents knowing the precise course of the Shunpike with certainty; and the introduction of Route 22 (crossing Snake Creek so far east of historic Hamburg-Savannah Road) negates using Route 22 as anything but a modern-day construct. (Does Route 22 follow any historic roadway?)

The good news: possibly unintentionally, a section of road persists to this day at Shiloh NMP in much the same condition/alignment as existed in 1862... that leaf-covered, little-visited segment of Hamburg- Savannah Road.

Ozzy

 

References:  Google Maps

Thompson Map of 1900 (in DW Reed's Battle of Shiloh and the Organizations Engaged) page 134

http://archive.org/stream/battleofshilohor00unit#page/n133/mode/2up

 

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I'm glad that Mona' answer of the River Road was the road in question.  The picture showed a presently unused road what seems to have been used in past times.  Mona's answer is correct and that means my answer would have been correct also.  Congrats Mona.

Ron  

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There are other sections of roads in the park that follow their wartime course, but yes, there has been a lot of adjustments, if you will, including by Thompson himself. And some wartime roads ("paths" is probably more accurate) aren't even there anymore, even as traces.  Some of them were still there when the park was first created, but are now completely gone. The two guesses that Hank and Jim made - the Corinth Road and Beauregard Road, look similar to that picture of the Hamburg-Savannah Road in stretches, and follow their respective wartime routes. 

I kind of doubt that the Hamburg-Savannah Road was unintentionally left intact though. If Thompson had felt it needed straightening or curving somewhere, it would have happened. But most visitors to the park still arrived via the Tennessee River up until about the 20's or early 30's, and I'd guess that then as now, the River Road didn't see a lot of visitor traffic. So there probably wasn't much point in making any significant changes. 

On Route 22, I don't believe it follows any historic route, no, at least north of the park. The "old" Highway 22, prior to the modern-day version opening in the early 60's I think it was, followed the Main Corinth Road through the park. A point that board member C.D. Rickman made during the anniversary weekend when the subject came up. C.D. said that locals referred to the new highway as the "bypass," and I think he added that long-time residents still do. 

Perry

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As regards the improvement of roads leading into the park... I would suggest prior to 1920 the bulk of Northern visitors arrived at Shiloh NMP by steamer. Southern visitors (predominantly those who lived nearby) probably arrived at the Park by wagon or motorized vehicle; but until the road from Corinth was reliably improved, I would suggest the majority of all visitors (travelling more than 100 miles to reach the site of the Battle) arrived by boat. [Which is part of the significance of that 1927 photo taken at Florence, Alabama of the Tennessee Belle. I imagine some of the Shiloh Veterans aboard her arrived at Florence by train.]

http://steamboats.com/museum/davet-photos7.html  Dave Thompson Collection, top image page 7.

No proof... just a theory

Ozzy

 

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From my previous reply:

"But most visitors to the park still arrived via the Tennessee River up until about the 20's or early 30's"

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