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Brent Cox

The arrival of 47th Tennessee Infantry April 7

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Brent Cox    1

I am currently researching Colonel Munson R Hill and the arrival of the 47th Tennessee Infantry Regiment CS on the morning of April 7. They were attached to Colonel Russell's brigade and placed in Duncan Field for they were the only reinforcements. Poorly armed with only a few bayonets, they attempted to stop Grant and Buell.  I hope to find diaries, comments or insight on their participation.   Photo Colonel Robert Milton Russell.  Brent A Cox

FB_IMG_1484439044909.jpg

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Ozzy    426

Brent

Here are a few ideas (external sites):

http://tngenweb.org/obion/records-data/military/   47th Tennessee, companies A, H and I

http://archive.org/stream/cu31924032778700#page/544/mode/2up  Tennessee Military Annals. See page 544.

http://tngenweb.org/civilwar/47th-tennessee-infantry-regiment/  History of 47th Tennessee

http://familysearch.org/wiki/en/Tennessee,_Civil_War_Service_Records_of_Confederate_Soldiers_(FamilySearch_Historical_Records)  familysearch.org family ancestor search site (free, provided by Mormon Church)

http://www.nps.gov/civilwar/soldiers-and-sailors-database.htm  NPS Soldier and Sailors (info on individual soldiers and regiments)

Here at SDG, click on "Browse: Forums" [top of this page]. On new page, insert "47th Tennessee" [with the quotation marks] into Search Box, and select [Enter]. You should retrieve eleven records contained on this site having to do with 47th Tennessee Infantry Regiment (some with external links).

Let us know how you get on with your search.

Cheers

Ozzy

 

 

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Perry Cuskey    257

Brent, in addition to the excellent sources that Ozzy provided, here is a very good article on the 47th Tennessee at Shiloh that I came across a while back. It's written by a historian named Sean Michael Chick, who has authored a book on Petersburg:

https://emergingcivilwar.com/2016/09/08/the-47th-tennessee-infantry-at-shiloh/

Unfortunately, with one exception, he doesn't list any sources, but he does appear to have done some serious research on the regiment. He also includes a picture of Colonel Hill, adding in the comments that he found it online. I don't know if that means he's uncertain of its authenticity, but he did include the image with the article. He looks like a good source of information about the regiment. The one source that he mentions, in the article itself, is the West Tennessee Whig newspaper. 

Also, the University of Memphis has a collection of letters from Private John J. Davis of the 47th Tennessee, written to his wife. I was able to download a pdf of the transcribed letters, or perhaps transcribed portions of the letters, I'm not certain. Here's the link to the overview page:

http://uldr.memphis.edu/vital/access/manager/Collection/vital:109

And the page where you can download the pdf file:

http://uldr.memphis.edu/vital/access/manager/Repository/vital:1890?root=vital%3A109

While checking the Tennessee State Library and Archives for something on the West Tennessee Whig, I also came across a listing for a small book or pamphlet on the 47th Tennessee written by a Brent Cox. Would that be you? :)

Perry

 

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Rbn3    96

The picture from Chick's piece seems to be from Geni, where I have found a few pictures incorrectly identified. The man depicted by Chick is dressed as a man of the cloth. Munson was a lawyer I believe. He could also have been a clergyman I suppose. 

The most egregious example of how a misidentified picture can infect the internet is the one "known" photo of Army Assistant Surgeon John Emerson who took Etheldred Scott with him as his valet to Fort Armstrong in Illinois and Fort Snelling in (then) Wisconsin Territory. The picture attached here can be found on find-a-grave and Geni and from there has been propagated. The man depicted as Dr. Emerson (in a British uniform) is Major General John Emerson Wharton Headlam.

Dr. John Emerson has been variously vilified because he was a slave owner. He was allowed (and collected) about $13/mo, as were all officers, by the US Army for a servant. So at the time the US Government was subsidizing slavery. This, of course, does not make Emerson in the right, just in the norm. General Headlam never owned slaves. I have posted the correction on Find-a-grave, and Geni has taken the picture down. But the damage is done.

 

 

Headlam Maj General J E W.JPG

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Ozzy    426

Rbn3

I take your point: if only there was a "fact-filter" through which to screen important bits of data... The other day, while researching information IRT Colonel George W. Roberts (involved with night raid at Rucker's Battery, Island No.10) the Life of Andrew Hull Foote had Colonel Roberts listed as belonging to the 2nd Illinois. Knowing the Civil War infantry regiments from Illinois began with Number 7, I assumed Roberts belonged to 2nd Illinois Cavalry... but decided to check and confirm... and discovered Colonel Roberts was listed with the 42nd Illinois Infantry. Don't know how the mistake in Foote's biography was made, but the editor missed it (perhaps Flag-Officer Foote, himself, wrote the information incorrectly in his report.)

Another example:  What time did US Grant arrive at Pittsburg Landing, morning of April 6th 1862?

My assertion: there is so much inaccurate information in existence, it is a wonder any history close-to-accurate can be compiled. Best we can do is accept that inaccurate data exists; take nothing for granted; double check (triple-verify) everything of importance; and correct our own mistakes when we make them.

Regards

Ozzy

 

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