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  1. 2 points
    Not to be outdone was Major General Sterling Price at the Battle of Corinth; (the other Shiloh battlefield). He captured five guns (one from Battery D, 1st Mo., and four from Battery H, 1st Mo.) on October 3rd but only claimed to have taken two. The next day, October 4, he claims to have captured "more than forty pieces of artillery." This took place near Battery Powell, where, truth be told, only eleven guns were taken. After a period of about fifteen minutes the divisions of Davies and Hamilton counterattacked and took back the eleven guns. Or was it more than forty? At the end of the paragraph he notes, "We brought off also the two guns captured at the outer line of fortifications on the 3rd." He didn't bother to mention he was not bringing the "more than forty" with him back to Ripley. Total captured - 4 Total claimed - 2 plus "more than forty" Number lost - 5 (he was correct in his report with this) Tom
  2. 1 point
    Thanks Ozzy, I appreciate that. The 77th Ohio went through many chapters, Shiloh being the high point, they went through the advance on Corinth, marching and counter marching across northern Mississippi to Memphis. They were assigned as prison guards at the old penitentiary in Alton, Illinois for 11 long months, then participated in the Little Rock campaign and occupation of the city. They returned to Marietta in the winter of 1863 - 64 to reenlist and recruit . They embarked on what became known as the Camden expedition where most of the regiment was captured at the battle of Marks Mills and were marched to Camp Ford prison near Tyler, Texas. Ten months of captivity. The men that were not captured were formed into a battalion that participated in the Mobile Bay campaign siege of Spanish Fort. At the war's end they became pawns in an expedition that was sent to the Rio Grande to counter the forces of Emperor Maximilian. The men were left there for months, finally they mustered out in March, 1866.
  3. 1 point
    Two more factors that made the WHL Wallace - Prentiss - Hurlbut Line a strong position: The number of Federal troops engaged (numbers taken from DW Reed, Pages 91-101) with WHL Wallace providing 6000 (after separating out 13th Missouri and three Illinois regiments from 8400); Prentiss (estimated to have arrived with 500 or so; but augmented by the 23rd Missouri (575)); and Hurlbut (minus Veatch) contributing about 5000... for a total (at its peak strength) of 12,075 men. Capable leaders. This became apparent to me when I encountered the performance of Major Ezra Taylor (working for Sherman and McClernand as Chief of Artillery on the Western side of the Battlefield.) Because the WPH Line benefited from having two competent directors of artillery: Colonel James McPherson and Major John S. Cavender. The man responsible for "sounding the alarm" at 4:55am (Major James Powell) also contributed to the effort, for a while; BGen Stephen Hurlbut may not have been the most dynamic leader, but he was steady, and most of his decisions were sound... and he benefited from having a bold, dynamic leader as part of his 4th Division: BGen Jacob Lauman. There were several meritorious Colonels of Regiments, two of which come to mind are William T. Shaw (14th Iowa) and Hugh Reed (44th Indiana). Last but not least, the team of WHL Wallace and Benjamin Prentiss. Until Wallace showed up in person (after placing his artillery), Prentiss believed that the 2nd Division was under the direction of MGen C.F. Smith; so the arrival of his old friend from the Mexican War would have been a pleasant surprise. And WHL Wallace admired Prentiss: there is no doubt the two of them worked well together, sharing infantry and artillery, and ideas on how best to fight their position. And the two Mexican War veterans appear to have worked well with Stephen Hurlbut (because the sharing of infantrymen and artillery pieces included the 4th Division.) Will add more factors, as they come to mind... Ozzy References: http://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=hvd.32044011616513;view=1up;seq=105 DW Reed from HathiTrust http://archive.org/details/lifelettgeneral00wallrich Life and Letters of WHL Wallace from archive.org
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