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  1. 6 points
    Sometimes from the depths of anguish and despair emerges something beautiful and inspiring. Such is the case with a Christmas song that started out as a poem, written in the middle of a seemingly endless war by a man who was no stranger to either anguish or despair. I'll let the video below tell the rest of the story. It's very much worth a listen. However life may find you as we near the end of 2017, I wish you better days ahead, and a truly wonderful 2018. Merry Christmas, folks. Perry
  2. 5 points
    Thanks for the links Tim. I believe I've found my favorite way to take in these hikes. Google maps, a Trailhead map and Tony's excellent videos. Life is good!
  3. 4 points
    Hello everyone. This is to let you know that we're ready to go with our next Epic Trek, with historian Tim Smith. This will be our seventh consecutive year with Tim, and it promises to be another great experience. Here are the details: Price: $30 per person. Payable on the morning of the hike. Date: November 3rd, 2018. Location: Shiloh National Military Park Start Time/Place: 8:00 a.m. at Ed Shaw's, just south of the park. (Not completely set in stone just yet on Shaw's, but Mona or I will keep you posted.) If you're not sure how to get there, don't worry, we've got you covered. Focus of this year's hike: We're going to be following in the footsteps of the Confederate army's Alabama troops, and learning about their experience at Shiloh. (See professionally drawn map, below.) Overview: We'll be heading out from or near Ed Shaw's, and head off toward Spain Field with the Alabama troops of Gladden's Brigade. From there we'll reinforce John K. Jackson's Bama boys as they navigate their way through the ravines east of the Peach Orchard and help encircle the Union soldiers trapped in the Hornet's Nest. Then we'll re-up with some of Gladden's men and plunge into the Canyon of Pittsburg Landing, better known as Dill Branch Ravine. Then on to lunch near the visitors center. After lunch it's off to the west side of the park, across Canyon Jr. (Tilghman Branch), to the site of Ketchum's Alabama Battery. Then we'll begin working our way back to the south along the April 7th battle lines, and our starting point at Shaw's. Total distance for this hike looks to be roughly nine miles, with terrain ranging from easy to most definitely not easy. We should finish up between 4:00 and 6:00, based on previous hikes. As always, sturdy hiking footwear is strongly recommended. Here's that (not quite) professionally done map, outlining our basic route through the park: Check back here for updates, and feel free to ask questions either here, via Private message, or by email @pcuskey@gmail.com. Hope to see everyone in November. Perry
  4. 4 points
    Captain Henry Binmore It is said that a good leader surrounds himself with good people. And, as has been discussed, Benjamin Prentiss had a number of good people in his employ, following on his election as Brigadier General (by the troops he was to command), on May 8th 1861, in charge of the Illinois Brigade, with HQ at Cairo. And those individuals selected by Prentiss contributed to the success of their General; and in return saw their own careers go from strength to strength. One such individual, not yet discussed, is Henry Binmore. A native of London born in 1833, Henry migrated to Montreal Canada at age 16 and became a journalist, self-taught in the skill of shorthand notation. After moving to the United States, the young man worked as reporter for newspapers in Illinois and Missouri, and got caught up in the phenomena that was Stephen A. Douglas: a rising star on the National stage, whose debates in 1858 with chief contender for a Senate seat from Illinois -- Abraham Lincoln -- also propelled that man into the National spotlight. Reporter Binmore published articles from those debates, all conducted in Illinois, in the Chicago Times and the Missouri Daily Republican... and probably led to Binmore gaining the notice of Senator Douglas (who won the election). Henry Binmore was employed as Secretary to Stephen A. Douglas, and remained with that man until his untimely death in June 1861. Private Secretary Binmore was suddenly in need of employment; and Brigadier General Prentiss was in need of a competent record-keeper/administrator. Given the rank of Captain, Henry Binmore became Prentiss's Assistant Adjutant General, and followed General Prentiss from Illinois to Northern Missouri. And when Benjamin Prentiss was assigned to duty with Grant's Army in Tennessee in March 1862, prospective assignment as Commander of the new Sixth Division, it may have been Captain Binmore who went ahead and reported at Savannah (while General Prentiss was busy with tasks assigned by Henry Halleck, and completed at Cairo, Mound City and Fort Henry.) It may very well have been Henry Binmore to whom Colonel Madison Miller reported on or about March 31st 1862, and received camp assignment for the 18th Missouri Infantry. (Next day, Miller records meeting General Prentiss, in person, and being assigned as Commander of 2nd Brigade, of the Sixth Division.) As AAG for the Sixth Division, Captain Binmore applied skills learned and practiced in Missouri to write and disseminate orders, and keep the books for General Prentiss. It is unknown how successful was Captain Binmore on April 6th, suffering the same surprise as the rest of the Sixth Division; and forced to flee north before 9 a.m., where it appears he remained close to General Prentiss in the Hornet's Nest (likely keeping an account of the Day's happenings -- and probably employed to deliver orders to units, close by, especially while Prentiss' designated courier -- Edwin Moore -- was away delivering one of the many messages to General Grant.) Before 4:30 p.m., about the same time Benjamin Prentiss ordered north the artillery batteries belonging to Hickenlooper and Munch (Pfaender), the General also ordered Captain Binmore to the Landing... and so, General Prentiss was without Staff when he was taken prisoner before 5:30 (Surgeon Everett having been killed earlier in the day.) A Staff officer without a General to serve, Henry Binmore applied to Stephen Hurlbut, and found employment as volunteer Aide de camp. In December 1862, when Major General Hurlbut was put in Command of the new 16th Army Corps, with HQ at Memphis, Binmore was promoted to Major, and then Lieutenant Colonel, and became Hurlbut's AAG. At the conclusion of the War, Henry Binmore returned to Chicago and found employment as a Law Reporter (while studying law.) Passing the Illinois Bar before 1890, he continued to work in the legal profession, and the writing of law-related documents and papers, until his death in 1907. Just a bit more to the story of the Sixth Division... Ozzy References: http://archive.org/stream/lincolndouglas2184linc#page/n121/mode/2up/search/photograph Henry Binmore bio pages 80 - 81. OR 8, OR 10, OR 24 (various pages) Shiloh Report of General B. M. Prentiss http://archive.org/stream/cu31924022842433#page/n0/mode/2up/search/Binmore Henry Binmore's legal papers A Politician Turned General: the Civil War Career of Stephen A. Hurlbut by Jeffrey Norman Lash (2003) Kent State Press, page 110. http://newspapers.library.in.gov/cgi-bin/indiana?a=d&d=PT19071107.1.8 Plymouth Tribune 7 NOV 1907 page 8 col.4 "Reporter dies" SDG post March 2018 "The 18th Missouri Infantry" [Colonel Madison Miller] [Sketch by Robert Marshall Root] Lincoln - Douglas Debate of 18 SEP 1858 at Charleston Illinois before a crowd of 15000 people. Prominent on the Speaker's Platform are Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, and scribbling away below Lincoln's left arm, Henry Binmore. [From Scenic and Historic Illinois (1928) by Charles E. Brown.]
  5. 4 points
    All, Well, as many of you know, I have worked a long time to develop the best image collection related to the Battle of Shiloh, and also, Corinth, Fort Donelson, and Iuka. Never have thought to ask before, but if anyone has any images, or knows of any images, related to these battles, especially Shiloh. Let me know, I would love to add them to the appropriate album. I would speculate that the Shiloh Confederate and Federal albums is the largest online collection of images related to the Battle of Shiloh available, well, anywhere. Hope everyone enjoys them! Stan
  6. 4 points
    Jim - here are a few screenshots from my gps app showing where we hiked, with some added tags (I hope I got them right - if not someone will let us know). I included the elevations around Tilghman Branch since Tim asked about it.
  7. 4 points
    I have my reservation in Savannah and plan to be there as scheduled. Since the research I have done over the years involves Prentiss, Peabody, Powell, the opening of the fight and the Sunken Road and Hornets’ Nest I invite anybody from this group and any others who have an interest to meet me at 9 AM on Sunday, Nov. 12, at the Prentiss headquarters monument where I will share information on Prentiss. Then I plan to visit Peabody’s monument to have a discussion of what happened in the opening of the fight. After that we will make a trip to the Hornets’ Nest to discuss the action there and along the Sunken Road. Other details like the amount of walking and time frame will be worked out once we get started. I have no fixed time for ending but figure on continuing as long as there is an interest to do so. I was going to offer to do this after the morning Trabue hike but since those plans have changed I adjusted to start Sunday morning. Hank
  8. 3 points
    I located Sgt. William H. Busbey's post-war article about his being near Grant's Savannah headquarters and on Tigress during the trip to Pittsburg Landing on April 6th in the Chicago Inter-Ocean. Some obvious errors make it not completely reliable, and it may be completely unreliable, but it does make for interesting reading: "I was at Savannah in April, 1862, associated with the work of the Adams Express company . Myself and another young man employed in the same office were sleeping on the night of April 5 in a house in Savannah three or four blocks from the river. General Grant's headquarters at Savannah were in a house very close to the river. We were on higher ground than he was, and about daylight on the morning of April 6 the young man sleeping with me jumped out of bed with the exclamation, 'There's firing up at the Landing.' We could hear very distinctly the boom of cannon, and when we went to the east window we could hear, or thought we could hear, the sound of musketry. Pittsburg landing was nine miles away, but in the still morning air the roar of musketry came to us." "We dressed hurriedly, ran down to General Grant's headquarters, where we found General Webster, chief of artillery, in his night shirt on the porch listening intently to the sound of firing. We saw him run into the house, and another officer came out with him. They listened a minute, ran in again, and General Grant came out in his night dress. The three figures stood like statues while Grant listened, and then the General gave an order that put everything in a whirl. Ned Osborne of Chicago was at that time in command of Grant's headquarters guard, and under excitement he was a very active man." "In a few minutes staff officers were awake and dressed, the escort was mounted and ready to go, and the General and staff boarded at once the steamer Tigress. I remembered as I looked over the steamers at the landing tht the Tigress was the only vessel that had steam up, and comprehending that Grant would go on that vessel, my comrade and myself went down and climbed on in advance of the General and his staff. There was a ittle wait for the escort and horses of the officers, but when all were on board the steamer did not move. Inquiry developed the fact that neither the captain nor the pilot was awake or had received any notice of the journey. They were stirred up in short order, and soon the Tigress started up the river for Pittsburg Landing." "About four miles above Savannah we came to Crump's landing. General Lew Wallace, in command of the division at that point, was on the steamer Jessie K. Bell. When we came up within fifty yards of the Bell, Grant shouted to Wallace, asking if he had any news from the front. Wallace shouted back saying that a courier had just arrived with the report that Sherman had been attacked by a heavy force. Grant, with great intensity of manner, asked: 'Does the dispatch say a heavy force?' Wallace replied that it did and Grant ordered the captain of the Tigress to make all possible speed for Pittsburg Landing." "As we started General Wallace shouted in surprise: 'General Grant, have you no orders for me?' and Grant, after thinking a moment, shouted back, 'Hold yourself in readiness to march.' Then we steamed away, but in a few minutes Ross came to me and said: 'It is a general attack this time, sure.' I asked him how he knew and he said that Captain Baxter had just received orders from Grant to take a steam tug and carry orders back to General Wallace to move at once and take position on the right of the Union force engaged in battle. We arrived at Pittsburg Landing in a short time and General Grant rode away at once toward the front." [The article went on about Busbey's experiences in the battle, including hauling guns up the bluff for Webster, the boats in the river, and Mother Bickerdyke.]
  9. 3 points
    It's not often you find an eyewitness account of "that march" conducted by Lew Wallace on Sunday, April 6th... Johann Stuber migrated with his parents and siblings from Switzerland in 1854, and settled in Cincinnati. In October 1861, the 23 year old, trained as a typesetter, joined the 58th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Company A, and was soon promoted to Corporal. First seeing action at Fort Donelson, the 58th Ohio remained with Lew Wallace's Third Division; and when that division was sent to Crump's Landing in March 1862, the 2nd Brigade (Colonel John Thayer) comprising the 58th OVI, 68th OVI, 23rd Indiana and 1st Nebraska, established its brigade camp in vicinity of Stony Lonesome, midway between Adamsville and Crump's Landing. Corporal Stuber's report for April 6th 1862: "In the morning we heard from the vicinity of Pittsburg Landing a heavy cannonade, which soon developed into an unbroken roar, which persisted as the morning wore on. From the Landing (where our provisions were kept), there came a "rabbit-footed messenger," who had arrived by boat. He loudly reported that he was a member of the 57th Ohio, and that upon being aroused from his sleep by the noise of battle, raced for the Landing and took a boat to Crump's, to deliver the news: but not for us to hurry to help, but to flee for our lives downriver. Knowing that our Army had 50,000 troops at Pittsburg, confirmed by Captain Markgraff during his recent visit, we refused to believe this refugee's report. "About midday, we received the orders preparatory to marching: ammunition was distributed, and we packed necessities and rations for ten days. After about an hour, we began to march south with our heavy knapsacks (instead of taking the boats, as we believed we would). It was dreadfully hot, and the soldiers of the regiments ahead of us threw away their blankets and excess clothing during the march, so that a carpet of clothing lined both sides of the road. We had hiked about seven miles, and were about one mile from our destination, when a report came that we were going the wrong way. We were turned around, and told to take another road -- which caused us to go double the distance in order to arrive where we were wanted. "It was during twilight that my regiment reached a dark woods, at the edge of a swamp, and were told to wait. And while we waited, we were not allowed to do anything -- no pipes or cigars -- because we were told the Rebels could be on the other side of the swamp, only 500 yards away. Finally, we passed through that swamp and reaching the other side, were told we had arrived. We continued marching, and the gunboats were firing, supposedly in the direction of the Rebels. We had gone about a mile when we entered a Union camp, totally abandoned by its owners, but with the tents filled with wounded, who all seemed to be moaning and crying from their wounds. We continued past this camp, and entered a dark woods, where we halted and attempted to rest beneath the boughs of the trees. But the gunboats continued firing; and it started to rain... a thunderstorm, no less. As bad as it was for us, we could not help feeling pity for the wounded, caught in the open with no shelter. We could hear them, away out there, somewhere, in the darkness, calling for help, and for water. And we could not help them. The pickets were not far from us; and the enemy's pickets were not far from our pickets. During the night, firing occurred between the lines of pickets, so heavy at times it seemed the Battle had resumed..." [Above record translated and edited; entry from "The Diary of Johann Stuber" for 6 April 1862.] Ozzy Reference: http://archive.org/stream/meintagebuchuber00stub#page/22/mode/2up
  10. 3 points
    My photos from this past weekend's Epic Trek are HERE if anyone is interested. Great time of hiking, learning, and fellowship.
  11. 3 points
  12. 3 points
    The Confederate dead numbered 1728, if I am to believe my Battlefield America map [and is the number given by David W Reed (pbuhn)]. Do we really think that 700 of them fell in the assault upon the Sixth Division? (OK, I know that someone will claim that the 16th Wisconsin killed them all.)
  13. 3 points
    I know this was addressed to Tom, but I will chime in, seeing as how photographs is "my thing". I love to study period photography, portraits in particular. The issue of "photographers prop" versus the soldiers actual issued weapon in a photograph. This is a doozie that IMHO will never be answered. In many photographs it is obvious what you are seeing is a photographers prop. How do we know? Same pistol, same knife, BUT, saying it is the same long arm, that to me is impossible to determine. I would argue that you see more photographers prop weapons in Confederate images. I think, in respect to your statement, that Federal soldiers did indeed carry their own weapon to the photograph studio. Soldiers would not leave camp and leave their weapon behind. They carried it with them. It then gets into well, was the photograph made in a town at a studio, was it made by a traveling photographer who set up a studio setting in the field, or what. Sometimes we can tell the difference, other times, not so easy to decipher. There are a lot of rabbit holes still left untouched as far as research is concerned about this. There are just tons of mind boggling variables. Just take a random Confederate photograph for example. You would have to research to see if the weapon the soldier is holding is the same style weapon that was issued to the unit, at least close to the time. I have seen photographs, and actually own one, where, down to the T, the soldier is wearing his issued uniform and holding his issued musket. Samuel Rickey, 7th Iowa Infantry. I would argue that photographers, mainly in the South, did not have access to THAT many military grade weapons to use as props. Those weapons were needed in the field. At a time when the South was buying shotguns, of all things, from private individuals to arm the military, photographers would have a hard time holding on to an actual military grade weapon under such circumstances. They did have them though. As you can tell, this topic could get extremely long winded and go on for infinity. Copying something I posted earlier, this is just the confusion in ONE unit, the 15th Mississippi Infantry at the time of Shiloh. "Col. Statham's request for 900 enfields for the 15th Miss Rgt is approved days before Adj. Binford requested 8,000 .69 cartridges and 2,000 Mississippi cartridges for Shiloh. There isn't a surviving munitions request for enfield cartridges and oddly the enlisted men talk about having Belgian and Austrian weapons at Shiloh, some of the accounts written less than a week afterwards. So they are certainly not conclusive at any rate." Weapons carried at Shiloh by Federal soldiers at Shiloh would be MUCH easier to ascertain and determine with a huge deal of confidence. The Confederate Army, much harder and in some cases I would say dang near impossible without documented proof coming to light. To make a long story short, using images is a good reference, but ammunition requisitions and other documents to back it up is required. Photos are a good tool to use, but far from solid evidence if taken alone without any other supporting documentation. If a soldier is holding an 1816 converted flintlock in an image, but you know for fact based on documents that his regiment was largely carrying Enfields at Shiloh, well, you know the 1816 is either a photographers prop, or that weapon was later turned in and the soldier issued his new Enfield. Having said all this, I applaud Tom's work, it is no easy undertaking and gives us a further glimpse into the events at Shiloh. Stan
  14. 3 points
    Thanks Tom. Yes, I have worked hard on the images for the Shiloh Discussion Group page, hoping this place can be a kind of repository for them. I am sure I have amassed the largest online collection of Federal and Confederate soldiers killed, wounded, missing, POW, etc., at the Battle of Shiloh. It seems like for some regiments both North and South at Shiloh we can paint a thorough picture of what they looked like and what they were wearing, but with other units, not so much. I will help out where I can, and good luck in your endeavors. Find attached an article describing, literally down to the maker, of the J. Curry Rifles, Company I, who were Alabamians that were serving in Blythe's Mississippi Battalion. If you save the image to your computer, you can open it up and zoom in to read it. Stan
  15. 3 points
    Well, haven't seen anyone post anything yet, so I figured I would give a very generic after action report of the anniversary events this year. I myself arrived on Thursday, but I didn't partake of the 12 mile hike first tour. Others may want to chime in on that. Thursday evening the park staff got together and decided to cancel the big living history. They were set to have 12 cannons, probably well over 100 infantry, plus cavalry. It was decided that with the forecast calling for heavy rain having tons of vehicles moving in Duncan field would turn the field into a torn up muddy mess. The decision to cancel was the correct one. Everyone gathered in the visitor center before 5 on Friday morning. The debate was made whether or not to cancel the hike and instead have a talk either inside the visitor center or at the picnic area pavilion. Bjorn, being the stalwart that he is, said he was going on his hike regardless. So, the event was on. We gathered at the Peabody monument and made our way to Fraley field, with Bjorn giving an excellent tour and description of the dawn patrol and the ensuing fighting. It was raining, but not heavily at this time. The dawn patrol hike completed, many of us next took part in Bjorn's tour of the morning action by Prentiss, Peabody, and Miller. We moved from tablet to tablet, with superb commentary of the fighting in each sector, even by the 16th Wisconsin Infantry (love ya Jim). We first toured and discussed Peabody's brigade, then moved to Miller's sector. I should insert that we had very respectable size crowds even though the weather was nasty. Finishing the Prentiss line talk at the Prentiss headquarters camp marker, Bjorn announced that he was going to do something he had never done before, and invited others to join in. From the Prentiss marker, we followed Prentiss' men and their line of retreat from their camps to their position in the Hornet's Nest. Bjorn stated that in the past the Prentiss line talk ended there and voila picked up in the Hornet's Nest, so actually making the trek from the camps to the Hornet's nest sorta filled the gap in the story. It was a very informative tour and talk, with everyone learning something new. We had one gentleman working on Gladden's brigade, the 26th/50th Alabama Infantry in particular, so we spent time unraveling facts about Gladden's brigade after it was chewed up in Spain field. We continued on, spent some time in Briar creek, talking about the terrain in that sector, and ended at the Hornet's Nest. A number of us enjoyed a fine meal for lunch in Savannah at the Dae Break Cafe (where the old Whirly Bird was once located in Savannah, behind the A&W/Long John Silver's eatery), Dae Break is a great place to eat btw. Making it back, the next tour was the Confederate left attacks by Pond, along with Wharton's Cavalry. We also stopped in Glover field where Bjorn described the fighting between Brewer's Alabama Cavalry battalion and Birge's Western Sharpshooters. We made our way down through Tilghman branch ravine. With the rain, the trek through the ravine following the Louisiana boys was slippery and muddy to say the least. The rain was at times very intense, while at other times just a heavy drizzle, all throughout the day. Many people were thoroughly soaked to say the least, but most everyone stuck it out through the entire tour. After cresting the ravine and discussing the fighting of Pond's brigade, we moved to Cavalry field and discussed Wharton's charge and repulse. That evening, many of us enjoyed good food, good company, and good discussions at Hagy's Catfish Hotel. It was a long day, and I think I speak for everyone in saying that everyone was bone tired by the end of the day, the rain adding to that tired feeling. I tell you, walking around in heavy rain can take it out of you! The following morning, Saturday, many took part in the hike on Lew Wallace. This writer skipped out on that, and hung out with the small contingent of reenactors that were on hand across from the visitor center. Saturday afternoon brought about another great Bjorn hike discussing the fighting at the crossroads, in Review field, Woolf field, and the action of the 38th Tennessee Infantry near Shiloh Church, all on 7 April 1862. I myself learned a great deal. We discussed more brigades and regiments than I can write about. The temperature on Saturday was cold to say the least. We had heavy spitting snow for much of the hike. Tony decided to head for home that evening, but we were joined by Mike Talplacido for Saturday, but Mike went in search of pictures on Sunday morning. Once again on Saturday evening, many of us went out to eat at Top of the River. Sunday morning we met up at the visitor center for the Fallen Timbers car caravan tour. It was still chilly, but the sun was out. We first stopped at Ed Shaw's for discussion. We then proceeded to the Johnston bivouac site of 5 April 1862. We then proceeded on to Fallen Timbers, where Bjorn colorfully described the fighting there. We proceeded on to Pebble Hill where we ended the tour. Many of us proceeded back to the visitor center, where most of us parted ways. I did not take part in the evening tour of the Hamburg road discussion on Sunday. There were other tours going on, naturally, and others may want to chime in on those tours. Like most fun events, it flew by too quickly. The Friends of Shiloh table was set up inside the visitor center as it was just too cold to have it set up outside. For those on the hikes, we withstood heavy rain, followed by nasty cold weather and snow, but in the end I think everyone had a great time. Ideas for future tours were also discussed, but I will leave that a surprise in case they come to fruition so others can have something to look forward to. I was glad to see everyone, and we wished others could be there. Shiloh, we all love that place, glad we got to spend time together there. Looking forward to the next time! Stan
  16. 3 points
    It was great meeting the two of you on Thursday! I had an absolute blast and am so glad i was able to spend the day with others who enjoy learning about the battle as much as me. Hopefully I can make another one soon!
  17. 3 points
    Aaron Loder Mastin, nineteen years old from Mercer County enlisted in D.P. Brown's Company F of the 41st Illinois Infantry (Colonel Pugh) in August 1861... and immediately commenced this diary. Of interest, because it appears Private Mastin was well educated; and in February 1862, with his regiment based in Union-occupied Paducah Kentucky, Aaron Mastin was detailed as Nurse and sent to help establish/ contribute to the operation of the Female Seminary Hospital (renamed as St. John's Hospital, and officially " 7th Division Hospital" at intersection of Chestnut and Court Streets.) Prior to establishment of St. John's, the Paducah Marine Hospital near the waterfront on Hospital Street appears to have been taken over as Federal barracks (incorporated into Fort Anderson) and a variety of churches and the Court House were pressed into service as ad hoc hospitals. Army Nurse Mastin details the efforts of Dr. Kirch to initiate the Hospital; and the handover to Dr. S.A. Williams (and Surgeon T.N. Wilmans) of the 200-plus bed facility, while reporting "what was heard" from Fort Donelson, and the arrival of wounded from that conflict. In the April 5th entry, Nurse Mastin (now Ward Master at St. John's Hospital) records "the burial of deceased hospital patients in trenches." And on April 8th reports "hearing of the success at Island No.10 and the first news of General Grant's battle near Corinth." The Diary of Aaron Mastin is important for its record of hospital service in Paducah (where many of the sick and wounded from the Army of the Tennessee were taken by steamer in March and April 1862.) Ozzy References: http://www.jacksonpurchasehistory.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/Mastin-Diary.pdf http://www.pa-roots.com/pacw/hospitals/hospitallist.htm List of Civil War Hospitals (included to illustrate that many hospitals did not get recorded, such as Paducah's St. John's and Cairo's St. John's Hospital.) http://www.findagrave.com/memorial/26655293 Aaron L. Mastin record at find-a-grave.
  18. 3 points
    its taken me a while but...heres the answer...Mcclerndand was station at Savannah in arch 1862...he sent Col Leonard F Ross of the 3rd Brigade of McClerndand's 1st Division.down that way for the purpose of cjlearing that section of the county of marauders and destroy rebel supplies.march 18th-20th 1862.The expedition left on the 18th with 3 reg of infantry,7 comp of calvary and 2 12# howitzers .they encamped that evening at plantations of me gould and a mr carter. the morning of the 19th they traveled on muddy roads to the town of pin-hook.there they confiscated a flour mill that was providing flour for the rebel troops..then they returned to in to Savannah on the 20th. 'in the previous post your link to the origin of pin-hook is very interesting...it read that it referred to to do with race horses...well not too far from this pinhook/lutts area is florence alabama..and back in the early 1800's it was a mecca for thoroughbred breding and racing.there is a road in florence named jackson rd--after andrew jackson who traveled down that road often from nashville for racehorse business. i will have to looking to this more but i dont recall any thoroughbred farms in SW hardin county..but...??the pinhook area was pretty much a farming community.kinda still is. p.s. i have to give stay allen credit ..he is my source of research on the expedition part of this answer. the horse part i know from jackson research.
  19. 3 points
    Major Joseph Kirkland wrote a Civil War novel published in 1891 in Chicago: The Captain of Company K. The first link below gives the background of the author and of the novel. The second link is to a copy of the book. Kirkwood actually served with the 12th Illinois with McClellen and left the service when McClellen was relieved. The 12th ended up in Tennesee at Shiloh and then with Sherman. Kirkwood's description of Shiloh is decent historical fiction as he remained a friend of many participants. The book is worth a glance just for Hugh Capper's pen and ink drawings. Kirkwood writes in the voice of a central Illinois farmer. The book belongs in the collection of "Shiloh in literature" - perhaps not on the same top shelf with the works of Bierce, Houston and others. http://civilwar.lib.niu.edu/islandora/object/niu-civil%3A14280 https://archive.org/stream/captainofcompany00kirk#page/n13/mode/2up/search/Pittsburg
  20. 3 points
    Crump's Landing (before 1904. Looks like the "strong gate to keep out Yankees" finally disappeared...) From Indiana at Shiloh: report of the Commission; compiled by John W. Coons.
  21. 3 points
    Lovely poem/song, Perry. I've always liked H W Longfellow's work. Here's wishing you and all the members of the Shiloh Discussion Group, peace in your heart this Christmas and good health in 2018. THE MANASSAS BELLE
  22. 3 points
    I needed a break from my continuing and relentless efforts to crush the Shiloh revisionism malarkey of the last forty years or so and decided to see if I could answer this quiz. 1. The man of many talents, Lew Wallace, sat on the Military Tribunal that tried Booth’s accomplices in 1865. 2. Ulysses S. Grant was fortunate his wife did not like Lincoln’s wife and she had no desire to accompany the Lincolns to Ford’s Theatre on the night of April 14, 1865. Lincoln’s so called security detail failed him miserably but Grant also traveled with a security detail and had he went with Lincoln that night history would be different. 3. My trusted copy of The Bold Cavaliers revealed the name of this officer and the same picture. The man is Thomas Henry Hines and the picture was credited to the Filson Club in Louisville, Kentucky. 4. Hines studied law in Toronto with none other than the former vice-president of the United States, John C. Breckinridge. (Source – Wikipedia) 5. The staff officer was an aide to P.G.T. Beauregard at Shiloh. His name is Jacob Thompson and he served in the cabinet of President Buchanan along with the notoriously inept Rebel General John B. Floyd. (I just searched on Google with the clues given and found his name) 6. Vincent Price would have made a superb Dr. Luke Blackburn as the story was told of his attempts to introduce Yellow Fever to Northern cities. Interesting to find that despite the attempt at biological warfare Blackburn was elected governor of Kentucky in the 1870s. Anyway, searching Google I eventually found a page of a book which was the biography of John C. Breckinridge and in it was described Dr. Blackburn attending to Breckinridge. They were both Kentuckians so it made sense. It is a little tricky to have John C. Breckinridge the answer to two disparate questions but the search for these answers was, as always, beneficial and informative in learning additional facts about the battle of Shiloh. Merry Christmas and Happy New Year to all. Hank
  23. 3 points
    Billy Thought I would have a go at finding that picture... and was amazed at my lack of success. First, I tried Wikipedia (and found the bio of Charles Carroll Marsh to be incomplete.) Then I tried Google Images: and although there are CDVs of other members of the Marsh family on offer, there are none featuring C. Carroll Marsh. http://www.findagrave.com Next attempted "find-a-grave" and searched Cook County and Chicago for burial site. With no result, expanded the search to all of Illinois; and although found "C. Carroll Marsh, died 1908" and "Charles C. Marsh, died 1907" neither of these are Colonel C. Carroll Marsh, formerly of 20th Illinois Infantry. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov The Library of Congress online newspaper collection at Chronicling America offers (free) access to back-issues of newspapers, that may be searched by State of publication for the information desired. Just under the heading, "Humanties: Chronicling America" is "Search pages." By entering Illinois and 1862 and 1863 and Carroll Marsh into the four boxes below "Search pages," and pressing "GO" I received the following hits: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/search/pages/results/?state=Illinois&date1=1862&date2=1863&proxtext=Carroll+Marsh&x=14&y=16&dateFilterType=yearRange&rows=20&searchType=basic [The entry for April 19th 1862 contains a "Listing of killed and wounded officers from Battle of Shiloh" that records Colonel C. Carroll Marsh among the "wounded," (without revealing the nature of his wound.)] But the most revealing detail of the Chronicling America search of Illinois newspapers -- out to 1917 -- lies in the fact nothing comes back "as a hit" on Colonel C. Carroll Marsh after 1864. http://www.familysearch.org/search Next went over to the (free) family heritage site -- Family Search -- and entered "Charles Carroll" and "Marsh" born New York 1827 to 1831; resident of Chicago Illinois 1858 to 1871: United States records -- Search -- and the following results were returned: an 1860 Chicago census (with Charles C. Marsh -- misspelled Marshe -- and wife Harriet, with three children) and a number of Alameda California voting registration documents, the last being dated 1896. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov Returned to Chronicling America, and searched the California newspapers: in Search pages, entered California and 1891 and 1917 and Carroll Marsh into the four boxes, and pressed, "GO" ...and this came back. The San Francisco Call for Tuesday, October 4th 1904 page 14, column 3 "Died" and column 4 "Marsh, Charles C., Colonel 20th Illinois Volunteer Infantry, beloved husband of Harriet Cooley Marsh and father of Mrs. C.J. Mattison of Oswego New York [two other adult children also listed], passed away October 2nd 1904 in East Oakland [funeral details and "private burial" indicated.] http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85066387/1904-10-04/ed-1/seq-14/#date1=1888&index=6&rows=20&words=Carroll+Marsh&searchType=basic&sequence=0&state=California&date2=1917&proxtext=Carroll+Marsh&y=15&x=15&dateFilterType=yearRange&page=1 The above information recorded to illustrate how this search may be attempted. Once it was determined that Colonel C. C. Marsh resigned in 1863 and settled in California (in or near Alameda), and died in California in 1904, the ability to uncover a "family photograph" presents, either at find-a-grave, some California library, his California workplace, or in possession of family members (possibly not published on the Internet, but likely in existence.) Happy Hunting! Ozzy N.B. Of course, now that "Harriet" is known to be his wife, with residence in California, and death date October 1904, a more thorough Family Search investigation may be attempted (and perhaps "place of business" or "political offices held" will return as a "hit" and allow search of those sites for photos... Update: although unable to find Colonel Marsh's grave (as yet) here is Harriet Cooley Marsh at find-a-grave. http://www.findagrave.com/memorial/180219283/herriett-marsh
  24. 3 points
    Ozzy noticed that Tony has uploaded his videos of the Epic Hike: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5LeGGxEr_-8 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5fSVhn6WQRk https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tYdCEoP0DMI&t=1307s
  25. 2 points
    As we know, after his defeat at Pea Ridge, Arkansas (also known as Elkhorn Tavern) Major General Earl Van Dorn of the Trans-Mississippi was requested to support the forces of General Albert Sidney Johnston in Tennessee… but there was no apparent urgency in the request. Van Dorn arrived at Memphis about 8 April 1862 and stopped at The Gayoso House. Also in Memphis was Mrs. Mary Ann Webster Loughborough, whose husband James, was a Captain on the Staff of Brigadier General Cockrell. Mary Webster of New York married James Loughborough in Kentucky a few years earlier; then the couple moved west and established themselves in St. Louis, Missouri (and subsequently gravitated towards the Rebel cause.) In early April 1862 Mrs. Loughborough wrote the following letter to a friend, revealing the presence of notable Confederates in Memphis: Gayoso House, Memphis, April, 1862. My dear J——: I am just in from dinner; and you would be amused to see the different faces—I might as well say the different appetites; for the Army of Missouri and Arkansas have been undergoing rigorous fasts of late; and the little episode of the battle of Elkhorn and the consequent privations have helped not a little the gaunt appearance of these military characters. All eat, eat rapidly; from General V—— D—— down to the smallest lieutenant, whose manner of playing the epicure over the different dishes ordered, is a study. The confidential consultations with the waiter over them, together with the knowing unconsciousness of bestowing his small change, almost convinces me that he is a brigadier-general, or a colonel, at least. You see streaming in constantly this tide of human beings, to eat, stare at the ladies, talk, and order much wine in the excitement of military anecdotes; for you must understand that a civilian is a “rara avis” amid the brilliant uniforms of the dining room. Yet, amid all this mass and huge crowd, the majority are polished gentlemen, who have evidently seen much of the world, and who are men of purpose and character. General V—— D—— and staff sit not far from me—looked at rather jealously by the Missourians, as ranking and commanding them over their favorite general. Yet, he always treats the old general with the utmost consideration and courtesy. On the other side sits General P——, with his kind, benevolent face. The poor old gentleman finds at the table his lightest reserves become his heaviest forces: nearly all his staff are about him. And, as I sit half amused at the expression of some faces, and thinking deeply of the mute, yet determined impress of character on others, two gentlemen come in—one in plain citizen’s clothing, with heavy black beard and high forehead—with stooping gait and hands behind him. I am told he is Governor J——, of Missouri. His face puzzles me—it is thoughtful and singular. By his side, with tall, lithe, slender figure, fully erect, walks General J—— T——. You will scarcely think it possible that this is the so-frequently talked of J—— T——. I thought him an ordinary man, did not you? Yet, this is anything but an ordinary man. The keen dark eye sweeps the room as he enters, taking us all in at a glance—a quick, daring, decisive, resolute face. I can make nothing more out of him. Yet, there is more of thought and intellect than you see at first. He is dressed in full uniform, with sword and sash, and has quite a military air. There are many Saint Louisians here; you see them scattered around the tables quite plentifully. General C—— is among the number. He sits at some distance, and looks quite worn and sad. You know—do you not?—that he is the father of young Churchill Clark, who was killed at Elkhorn. Have I ever told you his history? It is this: He graduated at West Point in the commencement of the war; and knowing and having a great admiration for General P——, he joined him at once: he was put in command of some artillery; and showing himself a youth of courage and ability—for he was only twenty years old—his command was increased. Throughout the constant trials and sufferings of the campaign, he showed himself equal in courage, daring, and judgment, to many older heads. He was particularly beloved by General P——. At Elkhorn, as ever, his battery sustained itself with coolness and bravery. As the general rode by, he said some cheering words to young Clark, who took off his cap and waved it, saying, “General, we will hold our own,” or words to that effect, when a ball sped from the enemy, and crashed in the young, ardent brain as he spoke. I have been told that the general was affected to tears. He knelt by his side, vainly seeking for some trace of the strong, young life, but the pulses were stilled forever; and Churchill Clark lay a stiffened corpse in the long, wet grass at Elkhorn. And so his father sits silent and alone, and all respect the grief that none can assuage. In a few days we leave. The gentlemen all go to Corinth, where a battle, in all probability, will take place before long. Fort Pillow can hardly hold out, under the daily bombardment that we hear from the gunboats; and if it falls, Memphis, on taking leave of the Confederate officers, will usher in the Federal to quarters in the Gayoso. Adieu.
  26. 2 points
    Thanks for all your hard work Stan.
  27. 2 points
    " water from the tennessee river" Jeez, the lest ya could do was give em water from Rhea Springs.
  28. 2 points
    Awesome image! Where did you find that one! Of course the 14th by Shiloh were in blue jackets-- But a great image. Don did Shiloh, if I remember, because people at that time were asking for something Western. He had a hard time finding how Johnston was dressed at Shiloh-- after much research he came with this rendition. The Arkansas troops, their uniforms are based on research done by myself and Jerry Coats of Gettysburg. Jerry dug out the ordnance and clothing records in the National Archives. Using some photos and flag research we put it all together for this painting. Jerry said his Western stuff just did not sell as well as his Eastern Battlefield paintings and prints. Remember when it was all Gettysburg and Antietam 25 years ago!!! Not so much today, but that was the way it was back then. I will fill in the gaps. I did do the research for 10 Western figures for Don.-- Tom
  29. 2 points
    Mona As prescribed in SecWar Benjamin's courier-delivered Letter of 27 DEC 1861, Bragg's options were: "I accept," or "I refuse." However, it appears General Bragg found a third way to respond (Letter of 6 JAN 1862 must be read carefully to discover the answer): Head Qrs. Army of Pensacola Fort Barrancas, 6 January 1862 Dear Sir Your private and confidential dispatch of the 27th ultimo reached me on the evening of the 4th instant, and has had my most earnest consideration. I could not reply yesterday by telegraph, but do so this morning, and shall anxiously await the President's decision. The aspect of affairs has so far changed within my present command that I feel greatly embarrassed by the alternative presented and the responsibility imposed. Had the President issued his order to me, I should have promptly obeyed without a murmur; but the alternative requires that, while I make no objection, I should submit a few considerations which impress me, and which the Department probably did not fully know at the date of the dispatch. A portion of my command is now powerfully menaced by a large force, constantly increasing. Our force, at best, is very weak, and part of it in very bad condition, so that I really cannot consider the city of Mobile perfectly safe. This place, to which you seem only to refer, is in no danger, unless from an incompetent commander; a danger we have just escaped. But it will take time, labor, and all the influence I can bring to bear to produce so good a result in the western part of my department. Much valuable time is already lost there, and but little progress is now being made, owing to the means I am compelled to use. This state of affairs is seen, felt and deplored by those who have all at stake. A feverish state of excitement and much alarm exists in Mobile, where the danger is greatest, and it is no egotism in me to say I am looked to as their hope and support. The influence I have gained over the minds of the people in this section of the country, as well as over my troops, is considerable, and I do not believe any other could now fill my place to their satisfaction. You will readily see, then, my embarrassment. The field to which you invite me is a most important one, but, under present aspects, not enticing. So much has been lost there, and so little done in organization and instruction, that the prospect of retrieving our ground is most gloomy. Troops so long accustomed to the freedom and license they have enjoyed will be more difficult to command than raw men; and though I have succeeded to some extent in making soldiers here of raw levies of volunteers, and at the same time retaining their good will and confidence, I distrust my ability to accomplish the same in the new field offered me. Without a base of operations, in a country poorly supplied at best, and now exhausted by being overrun by both armies in mid-winter, with an unclad, badly fed, and badly-supplied mass of men, without instruction, arms, equipments, or officers, it is certainly a most unpromising field for operations. But should the President decide on it, after knowing the state of affairs here, I will bend all my energies and faculties to the task, and offer myself (as a sacrifice, if necessary) to the great cause in which we are engaged. I shall need and must receive from the Department great assistance in the way of staff and general officers. Upon them depends, as much as upon the commander, the success of all his efforts. Many of the volunteers here are now so well instructed that this may be granted without materially weakening this department. Could you possibly send 3000 stand of arms here? I should desire to take from this army Chalmers' Ninth Mississippi, Adams' Louisiana Regulars and Jackson's Fifth Georgia Regiments. These would give me a nucleus upon which to form, would set an example of discipline, and would give me the support of excellent officers, who know and trust me, and in whom I place unlimited confidence. I should desire Brigadier-General Gladden to command them; Colonel Chalmers might be made a brigadier, to remain here in place of Gladden, and Lieutenant-Colonel Autrey would make an excellent colonel for his regiment, now nearly reorganized for the war. Jackson I should desire to see advanced to the command of a brigade. Major Slaughter, my acting inspector-general, is on a short official visit to Richmond. He possesses my entire confidence in every respect, and may be fully and freely consulted by the Department, as he knows my views in regard to matters here, and is as fully posted as I am. I am Yours Very Respectfully Braxton Bragg Major-General [to Judah P. Benjamin, Secretary of War, Richmond.] [Above Letter of 6 JAN 1862 found on pages 75 - 76 of Braxton Bragg: General of the Confederacy (1924) by Don Carlos Seitz.] Ozzy
  30. 2 points
    The following letter written by Major General Braxton Bragg to his wife, Eliza, and sent from Corinth on 29 MAR 1862 reveals the mindset of Confederate leaders in the build-up to Battle of Shiloh. Discussed in the letter: the importance of the Mississippi River to the Confederacy; incompetence responsible for the loss of New Madrid; Bragg's recommended strategy for Arkansas (and use of Van Dorn) Confederate evaluation of Union force (under C.F. Smith) and Smith's likely objectives; Bragg compares his Army of Pensacola to the forces under A.S. Johnston and Leonidas Polk; Bragg evaluates the current state of affairs, and offers suggested remedies; Letter concludes with "personal matters" (acquiring provisions for his family; and answering questions in Eliza's last letter.) Corinth, March 29th 1862 Dearest Wife, Your letters are all coming to hand since they have found me out, and yesterday I had one only three days old, written on my birthday, tho' you probably did not know it. You write under great excitement and despondency, and I must acknowledge, with much reason, but still I hope and trust a change for the better is about to occur. The rapid movement from Jackson to Bethel, and thence to this place, was to prevent the very movement you seem so much to fear. The enemy in large force ascended the Tennessee River, with a view no doubt of striking at or near this point, by which he would divide the forces of Polk and myself from those of Johnston coming west on the rail road. He landed in force and made two assails [against] our stations, one against Bethel, and one here. But finding us not only prepared to receive him, but arranging to attack him, he fell back, crossed the river with his main force, and now confronts us with only a brave few thousand, under cover of his gun boats. Desirous as I was, and Genl Beauregard was for sure, to bring on an action, it became utterly impossible. We could not cross the river; and they would not. In the mean time events have gone on very disastrously on the Mississippi River in Genl Polk's command, not from any immediate fault of his, but from a bad commander [McCown] and the unfortunate result of bad discipline, and too much whiskey. Under orders from Genl Beauregard to hold the place [New Madrid] until the last extremity, they had driven the enemy [Pope] back in New Madrid with a heavy loss. We were supplied, were fortified, and had force enough to hold out until we could reinforce them. But a big stampede got hold of them. Whiskey got into them, and a few, a false alarm that Genl Siegel, who was in front of Van Dorn in north west Arkansas, was upon them with 20,000 additional men... all was disgracefully abandoned. On the 23rd Genl Johnston reached here, Genl Beauregard came down [from Jackson] to mesh up, and a conference has resulted in changes I hope will save the Mississippi, though time is precious, and much needed. I insisted on a change of subordinate commanders of Island No.10 and Fort Pillow, which is the next point to defend if the first falls. All said they had nobody to put there, their best having been done. I offered my whole force, saying I could put any of my generals there and know they would never be stampeded. Being allowed to designate, I have sent Genl Jones to Island No.10 and Genl Villepique to Fort Pillow. I ought to have the whole command there [of Mississippi River defences] myself, and take my Pensacola and Mobile troops there. But that point I could not urge, of course, as Genl Polk, who commands, is my senior. I thought my Mobile Army was a mob, but it is as far superior to Polk's and Johnston's as the Army of Pensacola was to it. The commander of the disgrace at New Madrid [General McCown] I insist shall be arrested and tried. There is want of nerve to do it, but I shall insist, and hope yet to accomplish it. Stern, dictatorial measures are necessary, and as far as my influence goes, will be adopted. The enemy will operate on both our flanks, striking us here [at Corinth] whenever he is ready. Sooner one could not make him do it, as he is on the other side of the [Tennessee] River, which he controls by gun boats. But it is not so on the Mississippi: we control that below them, and can throw our forces at any point there by steamer. Had my opinion prevailed, we should have assailed him at New Madrid and defeated him there about the time we moved here. But fears were felt for this position, by which Genl Johnston would be divided from us. Swift measures would have saved both [New Madrid and Corinth] but that is now too late. To hold the Mississippi River is my primary object; the loss of its use be about fatal to us, and I shall unceasingly urge its importance. I find my opinions have some weight with both Johnston and Beauregard, and I shall not cease to urge my point. Johnston almost embraced me when I met him, saying, "Your prompt and decisive move, Sir, has saved me, and saved the country. But for your arrival [at Corinth] the enemy would have been between us." A change is to be made today in our organization. I believe the Army here, between the Mississippi and the Tennessee, will be called the Army of the Mississippi, as at present, but largely increased by Johnston's forces. This will all be commanded by Beauregard, and be divided in turn into two grand divisions under Polk and Bragg. Say 25,000 men each. Johnston to command all. And East Tennessee and Missouri. Under my urgent advice, supported by Polk and Beauregard, Johnston has decided to withdraw the forces of Van Dorn from Arkansas, and unite them to ours on this side of the river. This, you may recollect, I advised in January from Pensacola. Where he is, Van Dorn can do nothing; nor can he subsist his army. Arkansas is a wilderness the enemy will never penetrate. And should we unfortunately lose the Mississippi, Van Dorn there would be lost. With his addition, 20,000. If we do our duty, and work our men into soldiers, we shall be able to turn the tide, and redress our losses. But, great labor is before us, and we need not conceal the fact that great danger also threatens us. Our people, our generals, with a few exceptions, are not up to the emergency. Tennessee, Kentucky and Missouri are lost to us. Such has been the outrageous conduct of our troops that the people generally and very voluntarily prefer seeing the enemy. Polk and Johnston do nothing to correct this. Indeed, the good Bishop sets the example by taking whatever he wishes -- requiring it to be paid for, it is true. But, every man is not willing to give up his house, his necessities, servants, provisions, etc., etc., even though our Government is required to pay for it. The provision question is embarrassing to us publicly and privately. Financing the great difficulty in New Orleans. And hearing such accounts from Mr. Urquhart, I bought 20,000 pounds of bacon in Mississippi which was offered me as a favor. It will be shipped to Mr. Urquhart and by him one half to you and the other half to Towson. It will be more than either will require, or ought to use. Half of it ought to suffice. The other I thought it prudent to take as we might supply Pierce and your Mother. We face weeks more, not a pound of meat can be had in the country. The money you speak of for the girls, I paid to Towson in cash. He tells me he deposited it to your Mother's credit with Mr. Urquhart for the girls to draw on. That makes it all right. She is charged with it, but look on the other side and see if she is also credited? That might make it all right. Towson and Robert are well. My own health is good, besides a cold. The meantime -- Write. God Keep you Darling Wife Braxton. [The original hand-written Letter of 29 MAR 1862] is on file with Missouri History Museum -- Missouri Digital Heritage -- in the "St. Louis Civil War Collection" and accessible online at the following: http://cdm.sos.mo.gov/cdm/compoundobject/collection/CivilWar/id/1261/rec/20 Thanks to Missouri History Museum for making the original letter available online. Ozzy
  31. 2 points
    Stan Bacon in the amount of 20,000 pounds does seem a lot... until it is realized Braxton Bragg had extended family living in Alabama; and his wife (Eliza) had family living in Louisiana (as well as family ownership of one or more plantations, with over one hundred mouths to feed.) Properly preserved and stored, bacon has the ability to last months, if not years (and who knew in March 1862 how long the "emergency" would last?) Just a conjecture... Ozzy N.B. Of course, the Letter of March 29 is most noteworthy for the military information it contains. (More Bragg letters to come.)
  32. 2 points
    Grant's Greatest Strength From study of U.S. Grant's military history in the West during the Civil War, what becomes apparent is the General's aggression, drive and determination to take the fight to the enemy. Belmont -- initially flagged as a "demonstration in vicinity of Fort Columbus" -- was converted by Grant into a highly successful raid. Fort Henry was such an obvious target that newspaper reporters, all during the month of January, were conjecturing when that Confederate fort would be attacked. And Fort Donelson was merely the logical next step, after the capture of Fort Henry. Following the capture of Fort Donelson, the logical next step was "occupation of Nashville" (a major source of supply for the Rebel Army.) But, General Grant saw unedifying vacillation on the part of his Federal counterparts (Buell and Halleck, in particular), and took measures into his own hands to press for Nashville's occupation. First, Grant suggested to Major General Halleck that Nashville be taken. Then, finding no obvious plan in work, Grant suggested he could take Nashville. Finally, Grant determined that Nashville's occupation was needlessly being delayed; and took measures to "fix that problem" U.S. Grant told Halleck that he was going to Nashville (and added the proviso, "Unless you specifically prohibit my going.") He looked for an opportunity... and found it: the arrival of Nelson's Division, sent to assist in capture of Fort Donelson (and now, technically, Nelson's Division was a part of Grant's Army) Nelson's Division, in convoy aboard seven transports steaming up the Cumberland River, was deemed by Grant as superfluous; and labelled by Grant as "no longer needed." Therefore, General Grant thought it best to "return to sender" Nelson's force, by re-directing the flotilla a little further up the Cumberland, with new destination: Nashville. When Brigadier General William Nelson stepped ashore on February 25th he was the first Union general officer to enter the former Confederate capital of Tennessee. He technically belonged to Grant, who was in process of "returning him to the Army of the Ohio." (Which is why there is confusion to this day IRT who occupied Nashville?) To sum up, General Grant's greatest strength was his ability to "see opportunity, and exploit opportunity." (Drive, determination, aggression, persistence... were merely character traits used as tools by Grant to develop opportunity.) My take on U.S. Grant Ozzy Reference: Badeau's Military History of U.S. Grant (1867) pages 56 -61.
  33. 2 points
    I have attached some images I took last year of Shiloh from the air. I also marked landmark locations, etc.
  34. 2 points
    Or imagine if Johnston had a balloon at his disposal. I imagine he would have been more skeptical about launching an attack.
  35. 2 points
    As result of the campaign against Fort Donelson, the Union suffered 507 killed and 1976 wounded; and the Confederates lost 327 killed and reported 1127 wounded. And because the United States Forces were victorious, Federal forces were responsible for burying (or removing for burial) over 800 dead; and providing care for more than 3000 wounded. Many wounded Confederate soldiers were sent to Union hospitals in Louisville (which got General U.S. Grant off-side with Don Carlos Buell, who complained to Henry Halleck about wounded soldiers being deposited in his Military District without permission.) The remainder, Union and Rebel, mostly went to hospitals in Paducah, Mound City, St. Louis, and elsewhere. But, by the end of February 1862, many Union soldiers were still unaccounted for -- by their families back home. And the mostly full hospitals along the Ohio River and Mississippi Rivers were not emptying. (And there was concern that the 700-bed Hospital at Mound City was kept full due to incompetence of the Director, Doctor Franklin.) The people of Illinois expressed their dissatisfaction in newspapers; and in letters to their Representatives in Springfield. In response, at the end of February, Governor Yates of Illinois sent a Commission of Doctors to Cairo on a fact-finding mission [see Chicago Daily Tribune of 25 FEB 1862, page 1.] Doctors Curtis, Johns and Williams, and Major Starring, visited the most concerning facilities. As a result, the hospitals at Mound City and Paducah were found to be full because of the large numbers of recently admitted sick men (who added their numbers to the slowly departing Fort Donelson wounded.) Dr. Franklin at Mound City was determined to be doing his best: he had even sent 100 men home on furlough to complete their recoveries. And, at Fort Donelson, the Commissioners compiled more complete records of the dead; and discovered over 200 wounded men still in vicinity (many of these wounded Union soldiers had been captured by the Rebels during the Campaign, and placed in Nashville hospitals for care. And remained behind when the Confederates evacuated. ) About 100 of the worst cases were sent to St. Louis for hospitalization; 115 others were sent home on furlough. Governor Yates published his March 7th report in the 14 MAR 1862 edition of the Chicago Daily Tribune. A few days later, General Lew Wallace sent over 200 desperately sick men away from Crump's Landing aboard the steamer, Telegraph, for treatment that could not be acquired at Savannah, Tennessee... and unwittingly initiated friction between himself and General Grant (and infuriated the prickly Henry Halleck, who hated malingerers, and believed "his Furlough System" was being abused.) And, although this topic has been covered pretty thoroughly, it turns out... there is more to the story. Ozzy References: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84031490/1862-03-14/ed-1/seq-3/#date1=1862&sort=date&rows=20&words=FRANKLIN+Franklin&searchType=basic&sequence=0&index=16&state=Illinois&date2=1862&proxtext=Franklin&y=0&x=0&dateFilterType=yearRange&page=10 Chicago Daily Tribune for 14 MAR 1862 and 25 FEB 1862. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Fort_Donelson Fort Donelson casualty figures.
  36. 2 points
    Check out this interesting article. I had never seen this before. http://americanhistory.si.edu/blog/2014/06/lost-and-found-at-the-battle-of-shiloh-one-half-of-a-very-fancy-denture.html
  37. 2 points
    I could not give you "sources" on this story to save my life. One of those things you read, and remember reading, but can't "re-find" the story to save your life. But I recall the story of a wounded soldier at Gettysburg. He was wounded and he simply asked for a bowl of hot water each day (where and how he learned this I can't remember). But, while wounded Federals were dying like flies around him, he eventually recovered and lived. He washed his wound with hot water each day. I just took a college course semi-regarding this medical subject. What a shame, the U.S. was on the brink of technology that would have saved so many lives. Just imagine what penicillin and Pepto could have done for those poor soldiers back then. Stan
  38. 2 points
    Well, Van Dorn wanted some of these captured weapons, but it was told to him that a lot of the weapons could not be brought off the field. Which makes you think. How many of these "damaged guns" were outdated muskets, shotguns, etc., that Confederates "dropped" and picked up a better Yankee musket. Confederates would "probably" not waste their time trying to collect up all the damaged guns laying around. Wagons were needed to ferry out the wounded. It would take a lot of wagons to ferry out thousands of good condition muskets, much less damaged ones. Plus, the Confederates did not have much time. It would have required Confederates to go out by candlelight/torch to collect these weapons on the evening of the 6th. Needless to say the rain that night. The first priority was the wounded. I wonder how much, if any, thought was given to this very subject: gathering up much needed weapons. If it would have been of great importance, some considerable "force", slaves or what have you, would have been on hand to do that very thing, collect up weapons. I know that at Shiloh, in storage, they have 3 or 4 muskets found after the battle. One was a type of "sporting musket". It was broken in two, clearly to make it unusable. The others were damaged and left on the field and were in relic condition when found. The sporting musket looks brand new. But, 7,000, yes, that is a lot for sure!
  39. 2 points
  40. 2 points
    Ran across the below Smithsonian Magazine article, dated 28 June 2016, by accident, while searching for orders sent by Henry Halleck. The report caught me by surprise, as I assumed all the Civil War telegrams still in existence (North and South) had been de-coded, already. Just goes to show: there is a lot of material still out there, some of which may turn one theory or another on its head... Ozzy http://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/you-can-help-decode-thousands-top-secret-civil-war-telegrams-180959561/ 16.000 Telegrams yet to be De-Coded
  41. 2 points
    In Deference to Occam's Razor I happened upon the Rockwell Diary in the following way: after searching for "river miles from Paducah to Savannah Tennessee" in my favourite search engine (and not satisfied with the result) I amended the search term to, "river miles from Fort Henry to Savannah Tennessee" ...and the Bob Rockwell publication returned as hit number two. And, although available since 2011 this was the first I'd heard of the William Rockwell diary. Occam's Razor, reduced to a short and sweet definition: " The simplest explanation is generally correct." But, the Battle of Shiloh seems to defy Occam's Razor: there was nothing simple and straight-forward about it. Consider: the Federal commander was not even present on the battlefield until hours after the contest began; the Confederate commander intended to initiate battle one day earlier; the goal of the Union army was to "do nothing to bring on a general engagement," with intention to march on Corinth (which led to all manner of unintended consequences) the goal of the Rebel army was to engage and defeat Grant's army before Buell could arrive with reinforcements (but bad intelligence may have resulted in "hopeful belief" that Buell was heading for Decatur, instead of Savannah) the Federal division-based response(s) quickly degenerated into brigade-sized, and then regiment-sized efforts... which managed to coalesce into "structure" at Grant's Last Line (and Sherman's line along the River Road) the Confederate Corps-based attack quickly dissolved into brigade-sized and ad hoc combines of regiments... that almost succeeded. Researching the Battle of Shiloh is replete with unexpected difficulties: duplicate names (Wallace and Wallace; even Hickenlooper and Hickenlooper); mispelled names (Savannah and Savanna; USS Tyler and USS Taylor); every map is different... Until Shiloh Discussion Group arrived on the scene and began serious study, the Battle of Shiloh was well on its way to MYTH status (believe what you want, define it how you want... "evidence" to support any outcome is available.) Occam's Razor? No. The Battle of Shiloh is more in keeping with Murphy's Law. Ozzy
  42. 2 points
    Part of the reason it is difficult to know what role Federal cavalry played at Fort Donelson lies in the fact many cavalry companies operated as "independent units" during the Fort Henry and Fort Donelson campaigns... and then seem to disappear from history (which is unfortunate, because these independent cavalry companies persisted through the build-up at Savannah and Pittsburg Landing; and participated in the Battle of Shiloh.) Most of these units were affiliated with the State of Illinois, and were operated by Carmichael, Dollins, O'Hartnett and Stewart. It turns out, the Independent Illinois Cavalry Companies were amalgamated in December 1862 into the 15th Illinois Cavalry Regiment (see links below.) Ozzy References: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fort_Donelson_Union_order_of_battle (see Cavalry assigned to Colonel Oglesby's 1st Brigade) http://civilwar.illinoisgenweb.org/reg_html/cav_015.html 15th Illinois Cavalry (created from amalgamation in December 1862) http://civilwar.illinoisgenweb.org/history/c15cav.html brief History of companies attached to 15th Illinois Cavalry, beginning 1861 http://civilwar.illinoisgenweb.org/dyers/cav-stew1.html Dyer's History of Stewart's Independent Company of Illinois Cavalry
  43. 2 points
    Welcome Dean and I hope you will enjoy researching the regiment that won the battle of Shiloh and the civil War, the 16th WVI! Jim
  44. 2 points
    Mona Thanks for the more thorough examination of General Lew Wallace's Expedition against the Mobile & Ohio R.R. (destruction of trestle work between Bethel and Brown Station accomplished March 12th 1862.) It is evident from the tone of General Wallace's report that he was pretty pleased with the result achieved by Major Hayes and his 5th Ohio Cavalry. Unfortunately for the wrecking party, Southern railroad navvies were skilled and innovative at repairing damaged rail lines: it is reported that trains were running over that "section of torn up trestle" by March 16th [see March 16th 1862 Letter of Lieutenant Benjamin J. Gaston, 1st Alabama Battalion (Letter No.35 page 3) http://acumen.lib.ua.edu/u0003/0003915?page=1 ]. Part of the reason for quick repair: the repair workshops for the M & O Railroad were just to the north at Jackson. The other reason: it appears when Major Hayes removed the steel rails, they were simply tossed off the embankment, into the swamp. Enterprising workers, after restoring the trestle, simply retrieved those rails and put them back into place... which is why subsequent railroad raids involved bonfires and steel "bow-ties." Cheers Ozzy
  45. 2 points
    "There is a screw loose in that command." It is not for me to judge to whom Henry Halleck was referring when he wrote the above pointed comment on February 24th 1862; but, little could General Halleck have suspected that Ulysses Grant, that very day, was in process of finalizing plans to make his way to Nashville, "to meet with General Buell." Taking advantage of a welcome, unexpected sighting of General William Nelson's transports steaming up the Cumberland, General Grant made use of the opportunity to: 1) direct that convoy to Clarksville, the limit of its current orders; 2) to "return" the redundant Bull Nelson to Buell at Nashville. Ulysses Grant merely went along -- with an entourage -- "to watch and enjoy the show." [By reviewing the exchange of telegrams from 16 - 27 February 1862, to be found in OR 7 pages 626 - 648 and 661 - 671, a sense of the level of confusion then evident, IRT the "safe, yet expeditious" occupation of Nashville is revealed... and it is prostrating.] In answer, U.S. Grant took matters into his own hands. Nelson's fleet, under escort of USS Carondelet, arrived at Nashville in the morning of Tuesday, February 25th. Bull Nelson immediately stepped ashore, becoming the first Federal General Officer to return to Union-occupied Nashville... stealing the glory by three hours from D.C. Buell, who had organized a formal hand-over with the Mayor, to take place at 11 a.m. Meanwhile, Grant (aboard the powerful towboat, W.H.B.), escorted to Nashville by USS Cairo, appears to have waited until the following day, Wednesday, to begin venturing out and sight-seeing. Previewing scenes of three years later (when President Lincoln made his visit to an abandoned Richmond) Grant's party strolled the streets; stopped in to visit with Mrs. Polk (widow of former-President Polk); and visited hospitals in search of Union POWs captured at Fort Donelson. Then, having given General Buell time enough to hear the rumors "of another general in town," U.S. Grant dropped by on Thursday to visit with Buell, but found him out. Later, General Buell appeared -- with his own entourage -- at Grant's boat, the W.H.B. and the meeting was held. Afterwards, Grant left Nashville, and arrived back at Fort Donelson late on Friday, February 28th. Remarkably, letters were written during this time away by Grant and his party; but none indicate on the letterhead anyplace other than "Fort Donelson." In addition, General Grant took a newsman along: Franc Bangs Wilkie, of the Chicago Tribune. Wilkie also did not reveal the trip to Nashville, until long after the event... which seems to indicate the loyalty generated, and power of persuasion inherent to General U.S. Grant. Always more to the story... Ozzy References: OR 7 (pages as sited) http://www.artcirclelibrary.info/Reference/civilwar/1862-02.pdf artcirclelibrary for March 1862 (see pages 67 - 73) Forts Henry and Donelson, by B. F. Cooling (1987) pages 246 - 7. Pen and Powder, by Franc Bangs Wilkie (1888) pages 133 - 141. Letters of WHL Wallace, dates of 20 Feb and 28 Feb 1862.
  46. 2 points
    Not Hardin County, or McNairy County... but Madison County, a bit to the northwest. Robert Cartmell was a married, 33-year-old farmer working a property just outside Jackson, Tennessee when war broke out in April 1861. Since 1859 he maintained a diary (and faithfully recorded daily entries through April 1862.) Because Jackson was HQ for the Mobile & Ohio Railroad; and because the telegraph ran to Jackson, farmer Cartmell had access to timely news reports (often within hours or a day of the event) and Robert Cartmell would walk into town nearly every day to get the latest news, and then record that news (and his analysis) in his diary. Some of the more noteworthy entries: page 37 1859 Robert visited Corinth and recorded his impression of that soon-to-be famous railroad junction; (94) 14 Apr 61 The contest at Fort Sumter confirmed; (107) 8 Jun 61 Robert cast his ballot for Tennessee to secede; (149) 24 Jan 62 The defeat of Crittenden and Zollicoffer in Eastern Kentucky reported; (151) 8 Feb 62 "Went to town this evening and learned Fort Henry has fallen" (151) 10 Feb "Beauregard has arrived at Bowing Green (and gunboats have gone up the Tennessee River to Florence) (152) 16 Feb "Walked into town and learned Fort Donelson had fallen" (154) 24 Feb "The Governor wants the people of Madison County to volunteer (and he has gone to Memphis)" (154) Robert Cartmell joined a "militia company of married men" (Ford's Company at Jackson) (155) 3 Mar "A continuous stream of soldiers arriving at Jackson [from evacuation of Fort Columbus]" (155) "General Beauregard is here (and may make Jackson his HQ)" (155 - 162) Reports steamers carrying Federal troops up the Tennessee River; reports the arrival of Confederate soldiers in vicinity, until on April 5th he estimates 100,000 Rebels and 150,000 Federal troops are poised for a contest (all the while recording the daily weather; time spent at drill with Ford's Company; and work done on his farm...) A "diary with a difference," this record kept by Robert Cartmell is available online courtesy Tennessee Virtual Archive at: http://teva.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15138coll39/id/268/rec/302 Robert Cartmell diary (mostly recorded at Jackson Tennessee). Cheers Ozzy
  47. 2 points
    Because of the persistent flooding of the Tennessee River, and the expanse of water-logged terrain in vicinity of Union-controlled Fort Henry, that position was deemed unsuitable for loading significant numbers of troops. So, when the time arrived for the thousands of Federal troops camped in vicinity of Union-held Fort Donelson to "march to the Tennessee River and board steamers for the Expedition" (ultimately destined for Pittsburg Landing), those troops were not marched to Fort Henry; instead, they took the Ridge Road until three miles west of the Furnace, turned left, and continued southwest to Metal Landing (a point on the Tennessee River about three miles south of Fort Henry.) The first Federal troops to reach Metal Landing belonged to Brigadier General McClernand, arrived about March 4th. As steamers arrived, they were loaded, then joined the convoy led by Brigadier General Sherman's new division (dispatched from Paducah, and protected by a timberclad gunboat.) To expedite loading of soldiers at Metal Landing, Colonel Jacob Lauman was sent on detached duty from the Second Division, to act as Transport Organizer (Lauman was in place by March 10th.) And on March 13th, with the Federal troops mostly departed, Metal Landing was deemed suitable for holding Army livestock: pens were ordered constructed that could hold 1000 head of cattle. Metal Landing remained in use through the build-up of forces at Pittsburg Landing. Ozzy References: Papers of US Grant volume 4, pages 312, 322, 323, 342, 351 and 356. [Map showing Metal Landing south of Fort Henry, from Papers of US Grant, volume 4.]
  48. 2 points
    Thanks to Tony Willoughby for recording these videos, and making them accessible (especially for those of us unable to make the journey): this series of three is well worth the time, as areas important to both April 6 and 7 of 1862 are featured, much of which is generally difficult to visit, even if you do make the trip. And Tim Smith's explanations greatly assist with understanding why aspects of Shiloh progressed in the way they did. Well Done, Tony! Ozzy
  49. 2 points
    David Reed’s brother was Corporal Milton Reed and died of disease in Jackson, Tennessee on February 2, 1863 at age 19 and was originally buried there. His body was moved to the Corinth National Cemetery after the war where it is marked with a headstone. The name is misspelled as Milton T. Roed instead of Reed. Tim Smith wrote an article on Reed published in The Annals of Iowa, vol. 62, no. 3, ccin 2003 that relates the story. Find a Grave has a picture of the headstone. Hank
  50. 2 points
    A bit more on T.O. Edwards from The History of Dubuque County, Iowa, Containing a History of the County, Its Cities, Towns, &C., Biographical Sketches of Citizens, War Record of Its Volunteers in the Late Rebellion ... General and Local Statistics. Chicago: Western historical company, 1880. His daughter married Gen (?) William Hyde Clark. The definition of "such injuries" would probably include court-martial. It seems half the officer Corps was under arrest at Shiloh at a critical time. Much of this seems to have revolved around the use of ardent spirits. Maybe alcohol explains Edwards' checkered career, characterized.
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