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  1. 4 points
    Hello everyone. This is to let you know that we're ready to go with our next Epic Trek, with historian Tim Smith. This will be our seventh consecutive year with Tim, and it promises to be another great experience. Here are the details: Price: $30 per person. Payable on the morning of the hike. Date: November 3rd, 2018. Location: Shiloh National Military Park Start Time/Place: 8:00 a.m. at Ed Shaw's, just south of the park. (Not completely set in stone just yet on Shaw's, but Mona or I will keep you posted.) If you're not sure how to get there, don't worry, we've got you covered. Focus of this year's hike: We're going to be following in the footsteps of the Confederate army's Alabama troops, and learning about their experience at Shiloh. (See professionally drawn map, below.) Overview: We'll be heading out from or near Ed Shaw's, and head off toward Spain Field with the Alabama troops of Gladden's Brigade. From there we'll reinforce John K. Jackson's Bama boys as they navigate their way through the ravines east of the Peach Orchard and help encircle the Union soldiers trapped in the Hornet's Nest. Then we'll re-up with some of Gladden's men and plunge into the Canyon of Pittsburg Landing, better known as Dill Branch Ravine. Then on to lunch near the visitors center. After lunch it's off to the west side of the park, across Canyon Jr. (Tilghman Branch), to the site of Ketchum's Alabama Battery. Then we'll begin working our way back to the south along the April 7th battle lines, and our starting point at Shaw's. Total distance for this hike looks to be roughly nine miles, with terrain ranging from easy to most definitely not easy. We should finish up between 4:00 and 6:00, based on previous hikes. As always, sturdy hiking footwear is strongly recommended. Here's that (not quite) professionally done map, outlining our basic route through the park: Check back here for updates, and feel free to ask questions either here, via Private message, or by email @pcuskey@gmail.com. Hope to see everyone in November. Perry
  2. 4 points
    Captain Henry Binmore It is said that a good leader surrounds himself with good people. And, as has been discussed, Benjamin Prentiss had a number of good people in his employ, following on his election as Brigadier General (by the troops he was to command), on May 8th 1861, in charge of the Illinois Brigade, with HQ at Cairo. And those individuals selected by Prentiss contributed to the success of their General; and in return saw their own careers go from strength to strength. One such individual, not yet discussed, is Henry Binmore. A native of London born in 1833, Henry migrated to Montreal Canada at age 16 and became a journalist, self-taught in the skill of shorthand notation. After moving to the United States, the young man worked as reporter for newspapers in Illinois and Missouri, and got caught up in the phenomena that was Stephen A. Douglas: a rising star on the National stage, whose debates in 1858 with chief contender for a Senate seat from Illinois -- Abraham Lincoln -- also propelled that man into the National spotlight. Reporter Binmore published articles from those debates, all conducted in Illinois, in the Chicago Times and the Missouri Daily Republican... and probably led to Binmore gaining the notice of Senator Douglas (who won the election). Henry Binmore was employed as Secretary to Stephen A. Douglas, and remained with that man until his untimely death in June 1861. Private Secretary Binmore was suddenly in need of employment; and Brigadier General Prentiss was in need of a competent record-keeper/administrator. Given the rank of Captain, Henry Binmore became Prentiss's Assistant Adjutant General, and followed General Prentiss from Illinois to Northern Missouri. And when Benjamin Prentiss was assigned to duty with Grant's Army in Tennessee in March 1862, prospective assignment as Commander of the new Sixth Division, it may have been Captain Binmore who went ahead and reported at Savannah (while General Prentiss was busy with tasks assigned by Henry Halleck, and completed at Cairo, Mound City and Fort Henry.) It may very well have been Henry Binmore to whom Colonel Madison Miller reported on or about March 31st 1862, and received camp assignment for the 18th Missouri Infantry. (Next day, Miller records meeting General Prentiss, in person, and being assigned as Commander of 2nd Brigade, of the Sixth Division.) As AAG for the Sixth Division, Captain Binmore applied skills learned and practiced in Missouri to write and disseminate orders, and keep the books for General Prentiss. It is unknown how successful was Captain Binmore on April 6th, suffering the same surprise as the rest of the Sixth Division; and forced to flee north before 9 a.m., where it appears he remained close to General Prentiss in the Hornet's Nest (likely keeping an account of the Day's happenings -- and probably employed to deliver orders to units, close by, especially while Prentiss' designated courier -- Edwin Moore -- was away delivering one of the many messages to General Grant.) Before 4:30 p.m., about the same time Benjamin Prentiss ordered north the artillery batteries belonging to Hickenlooper and Munch (Pfaender), the General also ordered Captain Binmore to the Landing... and so, General Prentiss was without Staff when he was taken prisoner before 5:30 (Surgeon Everett having been killed earlier in the day.) A Staff officer without a General to serve, Henry Binmore applied to Stephen Hurlbut, and found employment as volunteer Aide de camp. In December 1862, when Major General Hurlbut was put in Command of the new 16th Army Corps, with HQ at Memphis, Binmore was promoted to Major, and then Lieutenant Colonel, and became Hurlbut's AAG. At the conclusion of the War, Henry Binmore returned to Chicago and found employment as a Law Reporter (while studying law.) Passing the Illinois Bar before 1890, he continued to work in the legal profession, and the writing of law-related documents and papers, until his death in 1907. Just a bit more to the story of the Sixth Division... Ozzy References: http://archive.org/stream/lincolndouglas2184linc#page/n121/mode/2up/search/photograph Henry Binmore bio pages 80 - 81. OR 8, OR 10, OR 24 (various pages) Shiloh Report of General B. M. Prentiss http://archive.org/stream/cu31924022842433#page/n0/mode/2up/search/Binmore Henry Binmore's legal papers A Politician Turned General: the Civil War Career of Stephen A. Hurlbut by Jeffrey Norman Lash (2003) Kent State Press, page 110. http://newspapers.library.in.gov/cgi-bin/indiana?a=d&d=PT19071107.1.8 Plymouth Tribune 7 NOV 1907 page 8 col.4 "Reporter dies" SDG post March 2018 "The 18th Missouri Infantry" [Colonel Madison Miller] [Sketch by Robert Marshall Root] Lincoln - Douglas Debate of 18 SEP 1858 at Charleston Illinois before a crowd of 15000 people. Prominent on the Speaker's Platform are Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, and scribbling away below Lincoln's left arm, Henry Binmore. [From Scenic and Historic Illinois (1928) by Charles E. Brown.]
  3. 4 points
    All, Well, as many of you know, I have worked a long time to develop the best image collection related to the Battle of Shiloh, and also, Corinth, Fort Donelson, and Iuka. Never have thought to ask before, but if anyone has any images, or knows of any images, related to these battles, especially Shiloh. Let me know, I would love to add them to the appropriate album. I would speculate that the Shiloh Confederate and Federal albums is the largest online collection of images related to the Battle of Shiloh available, well, anywhere. Hope everyone enjoys them! Stan
  4. 3 points
    Hello, My name is Thomas Arliskas. I am the author of the book, Cadet Gray and Butternut Brown, Notes on Confederate uniforms. I have been selected to be one of the Speakers at the Kenosha Civil War Museums annual Fall symposium. This years topic will cover the Battle of Shiloh. I will be sharing the stage with the likes of Professor Tim Smith and Larry J. Daniels. Good Company! My topic will be the material culture and the common soldier who fought there. Will cover the uniforms and the types of weapons used by both sides. I have been doing research type projects for over 40 years on the Civil War and Shiloh was a part of that. I originally started out with studying Illinois in the Civil War and from there Confederate clothing and uniforms. I have started my research for the Fall presentation, and found this site. Lots of information here! So, how important is the study of uniforms and clothing at Shiloh? Some will say none at all, some will say a lot. It has to do with what your interests are. If you just like reading casually about the Civil War; Generals, Campaigns, Battles, Politics, Lincoln, Davis, your focus will not be how the 1st Louisiana or 32nd Indiana were uniformed at Shiloh. Blue and Gray is enough for you. But now--- If your ancestor was in those Regiments, if you are commissioned to do a painting, if you collect memorabilia, or if you own an original Civil War firearm from these Regiments, you are going to want to know how they looked, maybe their Regimental Flag, and what firearms were issued to see if yours matches ordnance records. Shiloh carries a mystique all its own. Even the men who fought at Shiloh remember it as a horrible Battle, not a game changer, just another slug fest to contend with and then move on. Island No. 10, got more Press in the papers! Few Books are available covering the Battle itself, as opposed to Gettysburg or Antietam. Yet there are hundreds, thousands of diaries, letters, memoirs, pamphlets, stories about the Battle of Shiloh everywhere ready to be found. I have promised the NPS and the folks at Shiloh Park that when done I will send them what I have found on the Armies at Shiloh, North and South. Their uniforms, clothing, firearms, flags, and comments on all of it. Of course I will cover other aspects of the Battle. Like both Grant and Johnston-- though not in the common soldier category, they certainly had a role to play in the history and outcome. If you do have any information you feel I could use- please let me know-- This is a project in search of knowledge to be compiled for all those interested on just another piece of Civil War History. Sincerely, Tom Arliskas Happy to be a Forum Member.
  5. 3 points
    Hi. I live in Tempe, Arizona I have been a student of the CW for 30 years. I have eight ancestors who fought for the Federals and a whole lot more for the Confederacy. Shiloh is one of many battles in which I have an interest. I am a member of the Scottsdale, Arizona CWRT, Battlefield Trust, Civil War Talk. I look forward to learning more about Shiloh
  6. 3 points
    Most people reference Gott's book when giving Confederate strength at Fort Donelson. Gott mostly uses the "tabular statement" compiled at the time: He then proceeds to make a few imputations for units not included above. Investigation has shown that every unit he imputed is already in this list. They are: Culbertson's Battery of 300; these were the men manning the water battery, but were detachments from units in the list. The battery was manned by Maury's (Ross') battery, Coy A of 30th TN and Coy A of 50th TN. These units are on the list, and Gott double counts them. Melton's scouts are listed in the table as having 15 men. Gott gives them 58. Major Fielding Gowan's Tennessee cavalry squadron is listed on the table as having 60. Gott estimates 170. The Kentucky cavalry coys were attached to Forrest's regiment, and are included in it (see the returns below). Gott doesn't list sources, but gives Huey's coy an incredible 112. Also, for no reason Gott added 150 surrendered to the 48th TN. Finally, there is an addition error in his artillery table. We also have the returns for the formations a mere two weeks prior to Fort Donelson: Of these formations, the majority of the 4th Division, the whole of Floyd's "division" and Clark's brigades, and the artillery and 7 regiments of Buckner's division were at Donelson. Fortunately Buckner broke down the regiments strengths in his report and it is close to 7/12ths of his January return, and can be accepted. The PFD at Donelson can be (over)estimated thus: Thus the estimate of 13,000 given by the likes of Pillow seems accurate. Note that the highest figure given by any confederate is by Preston Johnston, but he double counted Clark's and Floyd's brigades. Removing the double counts give 15,000, which is consistent with the returns.
  7. 3 points
    Thanks for this. Another little piece of Civil War Chicagoiana to add to my collection. Rumsey was late to his own funeral...but for a poignant reason.
  8. 3 points
    I located Sgt. William H. Busbey's post-war article about his being near Grant's Savannah headquarters and on Tigress during the trip to Pittsburg Landing on April 6th in the Chicago Inter-Ocean. Some obvious errors make it not completely reliable, and it may be completely unreliable, but it does make for interesting reading: "I was at Savannah in April, 1862, associated with the work of the Adams Express company . Myself and another young man employed in the same office were sleeping on the night of April 5 in a house in Savannah three or four blocks from the river. General Grant's headquarters at Savannah were in a house very close to the river. We were on higher ground than he was, and about daylight on the morning of April 6 the young man sleeping with me jumped out of bed with the exclamation, 'There's firing up at the Landing.' We could hear very distinctly the boom of cannon, and when we went to the east window we could hear, or thought we could hear, the sound of musketry. Pittsburg landing was nine miles away, but in the still morning air the roar of musketry came to us." "We dressed hurriedly, ran down to General Grant's headquarters, where we found General Webster, chief of artillery, in his night shirt on the porch listening intently to the sound of firing. We saw him run into the house, and another officer came out with him. They listened a minute, ran in again, and General Grant came out in his night dress. The three figures stood like statues while Grant listened, and then the General gave an order that put everything in a whirl. Ned Osborne of Chicago was at that time in command of Grant's headquarters guard, and under excitement he was a very active man." "In a few minutes staff officers were awake and dressed, the escort was mounted and ready to go, and the General and staff boarded at once the steamer Tigress. I remembered as I looked over the steamers at the landing tht the Tigress was the only vessel that had steam up, and comprehending that Grant would go on that vessel, my comrade and myself went down and climbed on in advance of the General and his staff. There was a ittle wait for the escort and horses of the officers, but when all were on board the steamer did not move. Inquiry developed the fact that neither the captain nor the pilot was awake or had received any notice of the journey. They were stirred up in short order, and soon the Tigress started up the river for Pittsburg Landing." "About four miles above Savannah we came to Crump's landing. General Lew Wallace, in command of the division at that point, was on the steamer Jessie K. Bell. When we came up within fifty yards of the Bell, Grant shouted to Wallace, asking if he had any news from the front. Wallace shouted back saying that a courier had just arrived with the report that Sherman had been attacked by a heavy force. Grant, with great intensity of manner, asked: 'Does the dispatch say a heavy force?' Wallace replied that it did and Grant ordered the captain of the Tigress to make all possible speed for Pittsburg Landing." "As we started General Wallace shouted in surprise: 'General Grant, have you no orders for me?' and Grant, after thinking a moment, shouted back, 'Hold yourself in readiness to march.' Then we steamed away, but in a few minutes Ross came to me and said: 'It is a general attack this time, sure.' I asked him how he knew and he said that Captain Baxter had just received orders from Grant to take a steam tug and carry orders back to General Wallace to move at once and take position on the right of the Union force engaged in battle. We arrived at Pittsburg Landing in a short time and General Grant rode away at once toward the front." [The article went on about Busbey's experiences in the battle, including hauling guns up the bluff for Webster, the boats in the river, and Mother Bickerdyke.]
  9. 3 points
    My photos from this past weekend's Epic Trek are HERE if anyone is interested. Great time of hiking, learning, and fellowship.
  10. 3 points
  11. 3 points
    The Confederate dead numbered 1728, if I am to believe my Battlefield America map [and is the number given by David W Reed (pbuhn)]. Do we really think that 700 of them fell in the assault upon the Sixth Division? (OK, I know that someone will claim that the 16th Wisconsin killed them all.)
  12. 3 points
    I know this was addressed to Tom, but I will chime in, seeing as how photographs is "my thing". I love to study period photography, portraits in particular. The issue of "photographers prop" versus the soldiers actual issued weapon in a photograph. This is a doozie that IMHO will never be answered. In many photographs it is obvious what you are seeing is a photographers prop. How do we know? Same pistol, same knife, BUT, saying it is the same long arm, that to me is impossible to determine. I would argue that you see more photographers prop weapons in Confederate images. I think, in respect to your statement, that Federal soldiers did indeed carry their own weapon to the photograph studio. Soldiers would not leave camp and leave their weapon behind. They carried it with them. It then gets into well, was the photograph made in a town at a studio, was it made by a traveling photographer who set up a studio setting in the field, or what. Sometimes we can tell the difference, other times, not so easy to decipher. There are a lot of rabbit holes still left untouched as far as research is concerned about this. There are just tons of mind boggling variables. Just take a random Confederate photograph for example. You would have to research to see if the weapon the soldier is holding is the same style weapon that was issued to the unit, at least close to the time. I have seen photographs, and actually own one, where, down to the T, the soldier is wearing his issued uniform and holding his issued musket. Samuel Rickey, 7th Iowa Infantry. I would argue that photographers, mainly in the South, did not have access to THAT many military grade weapons to use as props. Those weapons were needed in the field. At a time when the South was buying shotguns, of all things, from private individuals to arm the military, photographers would have a hard time holding on to an actual military grade weapon under such circumstances. They did have them though. As you can tell, this topic could get extremely long winded and go on for infinity. Copying something I posted earlier, this is just the confusion in ONE unit, the 15th Mississippi Infantry at the time of Shiloh. "Col. Statham's request for 900 enfields for the 15th Miss Rgt is approved days before Adj. Binford requested 8,000 .69 cartridges and 2,000 Mississippi cartridges for Shiloh. There isn't a surviving munitions request for enfield cartridges and oddly the enlisted men talk about having Belgian and Austrian weapons at Shiloh, some of the accounts written less than a week afterwards. So they are certainly not conclusive at any rate." Weapons carried at Shiloh by Federal soldiers at Shiloh would be MUCH easier to ascertain and determine with a huge deal of confidence. The Confederate Army, much harder and in some cases I would say dang near impossible without documented proof coming to light. To make a long story short, using images is a good reference, but ammunition requisitions and other documents to back it up is required. Photos are a good tool to use, but far from solid evidence if taken alone without any other supporting documentation. If a soldier is holding an 1816 converted flintlock in an image, but you know for fact based on documents that his regiment was largely carrying Enfields at Shiloh, well, you know the 1816 is either a photographers prop, or that weapon was later turned in and the soldier issued his new Enfield. Having said all this, I applaud Tom's work, it is no easy undertaking and gives us a further glimpse into the events at Shiloh. Stan
  13. 3 points
    Thanks Tom. Yes, I have worked hard on the images for the Shiloh Discussion Group page, hoping this place can be a kind of repository for them. I am sure I have amassed the largest online collection of Federal and Confederate soldiers killed, wounded, missing, POW, etc., at the Battle of Shiloh. It seems like for some regiments both North and South at Shiloh we can paint a thorough picture of what they looked like and what they were wearing, but with other units, not so much. I will help out where I can, and good luck in your endeavors. Find attached an article describing, literally down to the maker, of the J. Curry Rifles, Company I, who were Alabamians that were serving in Blythe's Mississippi Battalion. If you save the image to your computer, you can open it up and zoom in to read it. Stan
  14. 3 points
    Well, haven't seen anyone post anything yet, so I figured I would give a very generic after action report of the anniversary events this year. I myself arrived on Thursday, but I didn't partake of the 12 mile hike first tour. Others may want to chime in on that. Thursday evening the park staff got together and decided to cancel the big living history. They were set to have 12 cannons, probably well over 100 infantry, plus cavalry. It was decided that with the forecast calling for heavy rain having tons of vehicles moving in Duncan field would turn the field into a torn up muddy mess. The decision to cancel was the correct one. Everyone gathered in the visitor center before 5 on Friday morning. The debate was made whether or not to cancel the hike and instead have a talk either inside the visitor center or at the picnic area pavilion. Bjorn, being the stalwart that he is, said he was going on his hike regardless. So, the event was on. We gathered at the Peabody monument and made our way to Fraley field, with Bjorn giving an excellent tour and description of the dawn patrol and the ensuing fighting. It was raining, but not heavily at this time. The dawn patrol hike completed, many of us next took part in Bjorn's tour of the morning action by Prentiss, Peabody, and Miller. We moved from tablet to tablet, with superb commentary of the fighting in each sector, even by the 16th Wisconsin Infantry (love ya Jim). We first toured and discussed Peabody's brigade, then moved to Miller's sector. I should insert that we had very respectable size crowds even though the weather was nasty. Finishing the Prentiss line talk at the Prentiss headquarters camp marker, Bjorn announced that he was going to do something he had never done before, and invited others to join in. From the Prentiss marker, we followed Prentiss' men and their line of retreat from their camps to their position in the Hornet's Nest. Bjorn stated that in the past the Prentiss line talk ended there and voila picked up in the Hornet's Nest, so actually making the trek from the camps to the Hornet's nest sorta filled the gap in the story. It was a very informative tour and talk, with everyone learning something new. We had one gentleman working on Gladden's brigade, the 26th/50th Alabama Infantry in particular, so we spent time unraveling facts about Gladden's brigade after it was chewed up in Spain field. We continued on, spent some time in Briar creek, talking about the terrain in that sector, and ended at the Hornet's Nest. A number of us enjoyed a fine meal for lunch in Savannah at the Dae Break Cafe (where the old Whirly Bird was once located in Savannah, behind the A&W/Long John Silver's eatery), Dae Break is a great place to eat btw. Making it back, the next tour was the Confederate left attacks by Pond, along with Wharton's Cavalry. We also stopped in Glover field where Bjorn described the fighting between Brewer's Alabama Cavalry battalion and Birge's Western Sharpshooters. We made our way down through Tilghman branch ravine. With the rain, the trek through the ravine following the Louisiana boys was slippery and muddy to say the least. The rain was at times very intense, while at other times just a heavy drizzle, all throughout the day. Many people were thoroughly soaked to say the least, but most everyone stuck it out through the entire tour. After cresting the ravine and discussing the fighting of Pond's brigade, we moved to Cavalry field and discussed Wharton's charge and repulse. That evening, many of us enjoyed good food, good company, and good discussions at Hagy's Catfish Hotel. It was a long day, and I think I speak for everyone in saying that everyone was bone tired by the end of the day, the rain adding to that tired feeling. I tell you, walking around in heavy rain can take it out of you! The following morning, Saturday, many took part in the hike on Lew Wallace. This writer skipped out on that, and hung out with the small contingent of reenactors that were on hand across from the visitor center. Saturday afternoon brought about another great Bjorn hike discussing the fighting at the crossroads, in Review field, Woolf field, and the action of the 38th Tennessee Infantry near Shiloh Church, all on 7 April 1862. I myself learned a great deal. We discussed more brigades and regiments than I can write about. The temperature on Saturday was cold to say the least. We had heavy spitting snow for much of the hike. Tony decided to head for home that evening, but we were joined by Mike Talplacido for Saturday, but Mike went in search of pictures on Sunday morning. Once again on Saturday evening, many of us went out to eat at Top of the River. Sunday morning we met up at the visitor center for the Fallen Timbers car caravan tour. It was still chilly, but the sun was out. We first stopped at Ed Shaw's for discussion. We then proceeded to the Johnston bivouac site of 5 April 1862. We then proceeded on to Fallen Timbers, where Bjorn colorfully described the fighting there. We proceeded on to Pebble Hill where we ended the tour. Many of us proceeded back to the visitor center, where most of us parted ways. I did not take part in the evening tour of the Hamburg road discussion on Sunday. There were other tours going on, naturally, and others may want to chime in on those tours. Like most fun events, it flew by too quickly. The Friends of Shiloh table was set up inside the visitor center as it was just too cold to have it set up outside. For those on the hikes, we withstood heavy rain, followed by nasty cold weather and snow, but in the end I think everyone had a great time. Ideas for future tours were also discussed, but I will leave that a surprise in case they come to fruition so others can have something to look forward to. I was glad to see everyone, and we wished others could be there. Shiloh, we all love that place, glad we got to spend time together there. Looking forward to the next time! Stan
  15. 3 points
    It was great meeting the two of you on Thursday! I had an absolute blast and am so glad i was able to spend the day with others who enjoy learning about the battle as much as me. Hopefully I can make another one soon!
  16. 3 points
    Aaron Loder Mastin, nineteen years old from Mercer County enlisted in D.P. Brown's Company F of the 41st Illinois Infantry (Colonel Pugh) in August 1861... and immediately commenced this diary. Of interest, because it appears Private Mastin was well educated; and in February 1862, with his regiment based in Union-occupied Paducah Kentucky, Aaron Mastin was detailed as Nurse and sent to help establish/ contribute to the operation of the Female Seminary Hospital (renamed as St. John's Hospital, and officially " 7th Division Hospital" at intersection of Chestnut and Court Streets.) Prior to establishment of St. John's, the Paducah Marine Hospital near the waterfront on Hospital Street appears to have been taken over as Federal barracks (incorporated into Fort Anderson) and a variety of churches and the Court House were pressed into service as ad hoc hospitals. Army Nurse Mastin details the efforts of Dr. Kirch to initiate the Hospital; and the handover to Dr. S.A. Williams (and Surgeon T.N. Wilmans) of the 200-plus bed facility, while reporting "what was heard" from Fort Donelson, and the arrival of wounded from that conflict. In the April 5th entry, Nurse Mastin (now Ward Master at St. John's Hospital) records "the burial of deceased hospital patients in trenches." And on April 8th reports "hearing of the success at Island No.10 and the first news of General Grant's battle near Corinth." The Diary of Aaron Mastin is important for its record of hospital service in Paducah (where many of the sick and wounded from the Army of the Tennessee were taken by steamer in March and April 1862.) Ozzy References: http://www.jacksonpurchasehistory.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/Mastin-Diary.pdf http://www.pa-roots.com/pacw/hospitals/hospitallist.htm List of Civil War Hospitals (included to illustrate that many hospitals did not get recorded, such as Paducah's St. John's and Cairo's St. John's Hospital.) http://www.findagrave.com/memorial/26655293 Aaron L. Mastin record at find-a-grave.
  17. 3 points
    its taken me a while but...heres the answer...Mcclerndand was station at Savannah in arch 1862...he sent Col Leonard F Ross of the 3rd Brigade of McClerndand's 1st Division.down that way for the purpose of cjlearing that section of the county of marauders and destroy rebel supplies.march 18th-20th 1862.The expedition left on the 18th with 3 reg of infantry,7 comp of calvary and 2 12# howitzers .they encamped that evening at plantations of me gould and a mr carter. the morning of the 19th they traveled on muddy roads to the town of pin-hook.there they confiscated a flour mill that was providing flour for the rebel troops..then they returned to in to Savannah on the 20th. 'in the previous post your link to the origin of pin-hook is very interesting...it read that it referred to to do with race horses...well not too far from this pinhook/lutts area is florence alabama..and back in the early 1800's it was a mecca for thoroughbred breding and racing.there is a road in florence named jackson rd--after andrew jackson who traveled down that road often from nashville for racehorse business. i will have to looking to this more but i dont recall any thoroughbred farms in SW hardin county..but...??the pinhook area was pretty much a farming community.kinda still is. p.s. i have to give stay allen credit ..he is my source of research on the expedition part of this answer. the horse part i know from jackson research.
  18. 3 points
    Major Joseph Kirkland wrote a Civil War novel published in 1891 in Chicago: The Captain of Company K. The first link below gives the background of the author and of the novel. The second link is to a copy of the book. Kirkwood actually served with the 12th Illinois with McClellen and left the service when McClellen was relieved. The 12th ended up in Tennesee at Shiloh and then with Sherman. Kirkwood's description of Shiloh is decent historical fiction as he remained a friend of many participants. The book is worth a glance just for Hugh Capper's pen and ink drawings. Kirkwood writes in the voice of a central Illinois farmer. The book belongs in the collection of "Shiloh in literature" - perhaps not on the same top shelf with the works of Bierce, Houston and others. http://civilwar.lib.niu.edu/islandora/object/niu-civil%3A14280 https://archive.org/stream/captainofcompany00kirk#page/n13/mode/2up/search/Pittsburg
  19. 2 points
    Edward Jonas Tracking this man is difficult because there were two Edward Jonas, both accorded credit as belonging to the 50th Illinois, an Uncle (1817 - 1867) and his nephew, and it is obvious that researchers have combined the experiences of the two; and in some cases credit has been given to the wrong man for accomplishments of the other. The subject of interest is Edward Jonas, the nephew. Edward was born into one of the first Jewish families in Quincy: his father, Abraham is recognized as bringing Freemasonry from his native England to Illinois; and Abraham had many and varied business interests; and Abraham Jonas belonged to a circle of friends that included Senator Orville Browning and the politician Abraham Lincoln. Following the Inauguration of Lincoln as President, Abraham Jonas, with support from Orville Browning was installed as Postmaster of Quincy. And Edward Jonas was appointed as Principal Assistant to the Postmaster (and he was only 17 years old in 1861.) Later that year the 50th Illinois Volunteers began recruiting; and on September 12th the underage Edward got his father's approval and became a Private in Company C. About that same time in September 1861 Brigadier General Benjamin Prentiss was back in Quincy, cooling his heels, under arrest for failing to obey the lawful orders of his superior officer, Brigadier General U.S. Grant. The Court Martial expected by Prentiss failed to eventuate; and General Prentiss was returned to duty in Northern Missouri. And the 50th Illinois was sent to St. Joseph Missouri (in Prentiss' District) and operated between that Missouri River port and Hannibal, on the Mississippi River, from October through December 1861. And it was most likely during this period that Benjamin Prentiss, still short of staff, found a position for Private Edward Jonas as Orderly (some references record “Secretary.”) The 50th Illinois Infantry left Missouri in January and joined General Grant's operation in Kentucky at Smithland. And General Prentiss left Missouri mid-March and joined General Grant's operation on the Tennessee River no later than the First day of April 1862. The next time Private Jonas appears in the historical record is in the Madison Georgia Prison manifest on page 10, his name and Robert Porter's name just below the line entry for Brigadier General Prentiss; so Jonas, Porter and Prentiss were all captured on 6 April 1862. And they all remained confined together until the 7 OCT 1862 release of all the Shiloh Federal officers from Madison Prison, after which Private Jonas likely remained in company with General Prentiss to Illinois, enjoyed a welcome respite with his family at Quincy; and early in 1863 returned to duty (as Second Lieutenant) as Prentiss (promoted to Major General) gained assignment as commander of the District of Eastern Arkansas. The Battle of Helena was fought in July 1863; and soon afterwards General Prentiss resigned from the Army. Suddenly in need of employment, Lieutenant Jonas was initially incorporated on the staff of Major General Stephen Hurlbut. But in 1864 Lieutenant Jonas was taken onto the staff of Major General Grenville Dodge: Edward Jonas is 4th standing man from right. [Above image of Major General Grenville Dodge and his Staff in the Public Domain.] Performing the duties of ADC, Edward Jonas was promoted to Captain, and gained two brevet promotions before the end of the war. After the war, Edward Jonas briefly returned to Quincy. But, his father, Abraham, had passed away in 1864; and most of the Jonas family relocated to Louisiana. Edward soon joined them and settled in New Orleans, where he appears to have become a property developer. Edward Jonas died in New Orleans in 1918. But, for those of us at SDG the revelation with most potential interest was brought to my attention by Author and SDG contributor, Joseph Rose: Edward Jonas wrote a paper titled, “Reminiscence of Battle of Shiloh.” In 1889/ 1890 Mr. Jonas was contacted in New Orleans by Henry M. Cist, a former soldier in the Volunteer Army from Ohio (several different regiments; who rose from Private to Brigadier General) who at the time was corresponding secretary for the Society of the Army of the Cumberland. In response, Edward Jonas provided a 14-page paper (and it appears that document is on file with the Missouri Historical Society.) I will be in contact with them soon – COVID 19 permitting – in order to arrange to get a copy of Edward Jonas' recollection. [There is also indication of an early April 1862 (April1st?) Letter from Private Edward Jonas to his parents in Quincy. ] References: Madison Prison manifest Rosen, Robert N. “Jewish Confederates” ( 2000) Uni. South Carolina Press, page 152. https://civilwar.illinoisgenweb.org/r050/050-k-in.html 2/Lt Jonas to Co.K 50th Illinois. Dodge, MGen Grenville, “The Battle of Atlanta and Other Campaigns” (1911) page 137 for above Staff photograph. New York Times of Monday 21 APR 1862 page 8: “Edward Jonas, son of the Postmaster of Quincy was wounded and taken prisoner with Gen. Prentiss.” https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/89149678/edward-jonas Find-a-grave Edward's uncle (1817 - 1867). https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/82425289/edward-l-jonas Find-a-grave Edward Jonas b.1844 mohistory.org Civil War manuscripts. St. Tammany Farmer of 7 JAN 1905 pg.5 col.2 “Judge Bossier is now connected with Mr. E. Jonas of New Orleans, a brother of Mr. Jonas of the firm Farrar, Jonas & Kruttschnitt.”
  20. 2 points
    Andy Welcome to SDG. I grew up in Rock Island County, Illinois and the Civil War statues and street names are everywhere (especially across the river at Davenport.) Rock Island Arsenal was established during the Civil War: one of its first functions was as Prisoner of War Camp for thousands of men captured in the South, beginning 1863. And Abraham Lincoln's footprint is to be found at nearby Galesburg (site of one of the Lincoln-Douglas Debates) and on Rock Island (as a lawyer, Lincoln represented the railroad and bridge company against the steamboat owners that ran into the first bridge across the Mississippi River and destroyed it. It is still believed by many that then-Secretary of War, Jefferson Davis, had a hand in destruction of the bridge because he favored a more southern route for the Transcontinental Railroad, crossing the Mississippi River at Memphis.) And of course, Lincoln left his mark on Springfield, only three hours away, and a required pilgrimage for school students, year after year after... Hope you find participation in SDG a worthwhile experience. All the best Ozzy
  21. 2 points
    Knowing that Wickliffe and Hardcastle were part of the party that crossed the desert from California with Albert Sidney Johnston it appeared that was the connection. A simple search of the other two revealed they also were part of Johnston's entourage. Brewer showed up on the SNMP facebook page. Ridley survived the war and lived till 1909 but Brewer was killed in Virginia in 1864. Hank
  22. 2 points
    67th Tigers Thanks for providing clarity and documentation supporting Confederate troop numbers and identity of units assigned to Fort Donelson before the surrender of 16 FEB 1862. Another source of information: Prisoner of War records. The approximately 12000 Rebel prisoners were progressively shipped north after February 16th to Camp Douglas, Illinois (about 8000 men), Camp Morton, Indiana (3000) and Camp Chase, Ohio (800). These records are accessible at Family Search via the link https://www.familysearch.org/search/collection/1916234. [Click on "Browse through 51108 images" for record access. Free account with Family Search required for access to their records -- takes two minutes.] In addition, it appears one unit was assigned to Fort Donelson, but for some reason was posted opposite the fort, on the east bank of the Cumberland River. Scott's Louisiana Regiment (of cavalry) may have been kept on the other side of the river, on the orders of General Buckner, due to a recent outbreak of measles in the regiment. The location proved fortuitous, because the regiment was not surrendered; after February 16th Scott's Louisiana made its way east, passed through Nashville, and is next reported ahead of Buell's Army of the Ohio in March, likely responsible for destroying the bridge over Duck River near Columbia. Cheers Ozzy
  23. 2 points
    Besides family, the people who know us best are those we attended school with. Here are a couple of observations of Ulysses S. Grant (one of which you've probably encountered already. But the other...) "One day at West Point, as our section in mathematics was marching to recitation hall, Frank Gardner produced an old silver-cased watch, about four inches in diameter. It, as a curiosity, was passed along from one lad to another... it chanced to be in Grant's hands as we reached the door of the recitation room, and he tucked it into his tunic and buttoned it up. The regular Professor was absent; Cadet Z. B. Tower occupied his chair. He sent four cadets to the blackboards, Grant being one. Grant quickly solved his math problem, and turned to begin his demonstration, when all of a sudden the room was filled with a sound not unlike a Chinese gong. All looked amazed, and Tower, thinking the noise was in the hall, ordered the door closed. And that only made the matter worse. Grant, with a sober countenance, continued his demonstration. The racket ceased, and shortly afterwards, so did Grant. Tower had no idea from whence the noise came (Gardner had accidentally set the alarm on the ancient timepiece concealed in Grant's bosom.) Tower's bewilderment, and Grant's sobriety afforded us much amusement." Rufus Ingalls (USMA 1843) was known at West Point as "the Prince of Good Fellows." During the Civil War, he served as Chief Quartermaster of the Army of the Potomac; and one night during Spring of 1865, at City Point, he and General Grant and a few others were sitting around their camp fire. Conversation had lapsed into silence, which after a while was suddenly broken by Grant exclaiming: "Ingalls, do you expect to take that yellow dog of yours into Richmond with you?" Ingalls nodded. "Oh yes, General. You see, he belongs to a long-life breed." Silence returned, but many of the witnesses had to remove themselves for a time...
  24. 2 points
    The 47th Tennessee Infantry were the only reinforcements the Confederates received on the 2nd day of the Battle of Shiloh. This article is neat summation of the 47th Tennessee, the weapons they carried, and their action in the battle. Interesting short piece to read. https://emergingcivilwar.com/2016/09/08/the-47th-tennessee-infantry-at-shiloh/ Below: Col. Munson Hill of the 47th Tennessee Infantry, wearing fraternal garb.
  25. 2 points
    As we know, after his defeat at Pea Ridge, Arkansas (also known as Elkhorn Tavern) Major General Earl Van Dorn of the Trans-Mississippi was requested to support the forces of General Albert Sidney Johnston in Tennessee… but there was no apparent urgency in the request. Van Dorn arrived at Memphis about 8 April 1862 and stopped at The Gayoso House. Also in Memphis was Mrs. Mary Ann Webster Loughborough, whose husband James, was a Captain on the Staff of Brigadier General Cockrell. Mary Webster of New York married James Loughborough in Kentucky a few years earlier; then the couple moved west and established themselves in St. Louis, Missouri (and subsequently gravitated towards the Rebel cause.) In early April 1862 Mrs. Loughborough wrote the following letter to a friend, revealing the presence of notable Confederates in Memphis: Gayoso House, Memphis, April, 1862. My dear J——: I am just in from dinner; and you would be amused to see the different faces—I might as well say the different appetites; for the Army of Missouri and Arkansas have been undergoing rigorous fasts of late; and the little episode of the battle of Elkhorn and the consequent privations have helped not a little the gaunt appearance of these military characters. All eat, eat rapidly; from General V—— D—— down to the smallest lieutenant, whose manner of playing the epicure over the different dishes ordered, is a study. The confidential consultations with the waiter over them, together with the knowing unconsciousness of bestowing his small change, almost convinces me that he is a brigadier-general, or a colonel, at least. You see streaming in constantly this tide of human beings, to eat, stare at the ladies, talk, and order much wine in the excitement of military anecdotes; for you must understand that a civilian is a “rara avis” amid the brilliant uniforms of the dining room. Yet, amid all this mass and huge crowd, the majority are polished gentlemen, who have evidently seen much of the world, and who are men of purpose and character. General V—— D—— and staff sit not far from me—looked at rather jealously by the Missourians, as ranking and commanding them over their favorite general. Yet, he always treats the old general with the utmost consideration and courtesy. On the other side sits General P——, with his kind, benevolent face. The poor old gentleman finds at the table his lightest reserves become his heaviest forces: nearly all his staff are about him. And, as I sit half amused at the expression of some faces, and thinking deeply of the mute, yet determined impress of character on others, two gentlemen come in—one in plain citizen’s clothing, with heavy black beard and high forehead—with stooping gait and hands behind him. I am told he is Governor J——, of Missouri. His face puzzles me—it is thoughtful and singular. By his side, with tall, lithe, slender figure, fully erect, walks General J—— T——. You will scarcely think it possible that this is the so-frequently talked of J—— T——. I thought him an ordinary man, did not you? Yet, this is anything but an ordinary man. The keen dark eye sweeps the room as he enters, taking us all in at a glance—a quick, daring, decisive, resolute face. I can make nothing more out of him. Yet, there is more of thought and intellect than you see at first. He is dressed in full uniform, with sword and sash, and has quite a military air. There are many Saint Louisians here; you see them scattered around the tables quite plentifully. General C—— is among the number. He sits at some distance, and looks quite worn and sad. You know—do you not?—that he is the father of young Churchill Clark, who was killed at Elkhorn. Have I ever told you his history? It is this: He graduated at West Point in the commencement of the war; and knowing and having a great admiration for General P——, he joined him at once: he was put in command of some artillery; and showing himself a youth of courage and ability—for he was only twenty years old—his command was increased. Throughout the constant trials and sufferings of the campaign, he showed himself equal in courage, daring, and judgment, to many older heads. He was particularly beloved by General P——. At Elkhorn, as ever, his battery sustained itself with coolness and bravery. As the general rode by, he said some cheering words to young Clark, who took off his cap and waved it, saying, “General, we will hold our own,” or words to that effect, when a ball sped from the enemy, and crashed in the young, ardent brain as he spoke. I have been told that the general was affected to tears. He knelt by his side, vainly seeking for some trace of the strong, young life, but the pulses were stilled forever; and Churchill Clark lay a stiffened corpse in the long, wet grass at Elkhorn. And so his father sits silent and alone, and all respect the grief that none can assuage. In a few days we leave. The gentlemen all go to Corinth, where a battle, in all probability, will take place before long. Fort Pillow can hardly hold out, under the daily bombardment that we hear from the gunboats; and if it falls, Memphis, on taking leave of the Confederate officers, will usher in the Federal to quarters in the Gayoso. Adieu.
  26. 2 points
    [Part three of Corinth, interrupted] Grant’s operation, with HQ at Savannah was kept on the back burner: just active enough to keep Rebel commanders guessing, but not sufficiently robust to allow General Grant to take the reins pre-emptively. The first benefit to Grant from success further west was assignment of Benjamin Prentiss to command of the newly created Sixth Division (although Halleck tasked Brigadier General Prentiss with other duties enroute, delaying his ultimate arrival at Pittsburg Landing.) In addition, Grant was aware that Don Carlos Buell was marching south and west to effect a join at Savannah (but Grant was frustrated by the slow pace of the Army of the Ohio.) Still, these troop additions were approved by Halleck, and were part of the overall plan to initiate the Operation against Corinth, in the proper sequence… after Victory at Island No.10 (when another source of manpower (Pope), as well as ammunition and abundant supplies would be made available.) References: SDG topics “Just supposin’ begun 26 FEB 2018 and “Full Hospitals” begun 30 JAN 2018 for Prentiss tasks enroute to Savannah Tennessee. SDG topic “Grant’s six divisions” begun 1 DEC 2018 details growth of Pittsburg force. OR 8 pages 633 – 4 telegram (23 MAR 1862) in which Henry Halleck lays out his “Programme” for SecWar Stanton, which includes, “Pope’s progress is necessarily slow,” and, “I have directed General Grant to make no move until Buell’s column (now at Columbia) can form junction with him.” Also, Halleck asserts, “We must take Corinth in order to seriously injure Rebel communications.” [And Halleck proposes possible moves for T.W. Sherman (the other Sherman) and Benjamin Butler which “might take advantage of [Bragg’s Army] leaving Florida and Alabama.”] OR 8 page 631 communication of 21 MAR 1862 from MGen Halleck to F/O Foote: “Everything is progressing well on the Tennessee River towards opening your way down the Mississippi.” [Illustrates the “connected” nature of Halleck’s operations, and alludes to the “proper sequence” of those operations.] OR 8 page 643 telegram from Army AG Thomas to MGen Halleck of 25 MAR 1862: “BGen Thomas Davies has been assigned duty in Department of the Mississippi.” [In preparation for conduct of operations after success at Island No.10 Halleck has called for more trained general officers to assist, as part of Halleck’s program. General Thomas Davies will be assigned command of Second Division, following deaths of WHL Wallace… and C.F. Smith.] OR 8 page 649 telegram SecWar Stanton to MGen Halleck of 29 MAR 1862: “You will report without delay the strength and distribution of your command.” [Halleck’s response 30 March: “Buell 101,000 in KY and Tenn; Grant 75,000 in Tennessee; Pope 25000 at New Madrid; Curtis 23000 in Arkansas; Strong 9000 District of Cairo; Steele 6000 in Arkansas; Schofield 15000 District of St. Louis (including new regiments at Benton Barracks); Totten 4000 in Central Missouri; Loan 2000 in Northern Missouri; about 10000 men in Kansas, Nebraska and Colorado.”] And follows telegram of Halleck to Stanton of 28 MAR 1862 revealing “elevated level of sickness experienced by men on Tennessee River expedition” (and lays blame on brigade and regimental surgeons of volunteers.) One-in-three reported sick, and is of concern because Halleck intends to make use of Grant’s Army… soon. OR 8 page 660 communication MGen Halleck to F/O Andrew Foote of 5 APR 1862: “I shall want a gunboat at Cairo ready to go up the Tennessee River in the early part of next week.” [With the successful run of USS Carondelet past the guns of Island No.10 on April 4th, Halleck knows it is “a matter of days” before Pope crosses his army and forces the trapped Rebels to surrender (in rear of Island No.10).] OR 8 page 661 communication Halleck to MGen Samuel Curtis (Army of the Southwest) on April 5th 1862: “Price and Van Dorn will soon leave your front [and the great battle of the war is to be fought on the Tennessee River.]” OR 8 page 672 telegram Halleck to Stanton of 7 APR 1862: “Buell’s advance force has reached Grant; entire force will connect in two or three days” [sent before news arrived at St. Louis IRT Battle of Shiloh initiated early 6 APR 1862.] OR 8 page 676 communication of 8 APR 1862 from Assistant Secretary of War Thomas Scott to Henry Halleck, alluding to “sequence of events” after Surrender of Island No.10.
  27. 2 points
    Then again, I don't know how much that time mattered. The Confederates were disorganized, thus part of the reason they stopped. Had they continued on the attack, being so disorganized, I venture that the disorganization would have caused even more ill coordinated attacks, and potentially, disaster for the Confederates, if that makes sense.
  28. 2 points
    Liberty Independence Nixon, his findagrave page and his photograph. https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/25015250/liberty-independence-nixon
  29. 2 points
    I realize it is just one regiment in a large battle, but I often wonder if A. S. Johnston knew how somewhat unorganized many of the regiments in the Army were, i.e. the 26th Alabama Infantry. The organization was not led by Maj. Chaddick, but actually by Colonel John G. Coltart of Huntsville. I have posted before the letters of Lt. Benjamin J. Gaston of the 26th Alabama. Just 3 days before the battle, Gaston was writing and stated that he did not know the "number" (regimental designation) of his unit. I have seen other historians and writers erroneously attribute the leadership of the 26th to Chaddick rather than Coltart. My his memory always shine bright, but from memory in Shiloh Bloody April, even Wiley Sword mentions Chaddick being the commander of the unit. When Gladden's men stopped in the Federal camp, well, upon renewing the attack, at that point Coltart was wounded, and Chaddick took temporary control of the unit. Coltart received a severe foot wound, but, he had it tended to behind the lines and then returned to the fight. It seems amazing to me that many men went in to that fight not knowing who their commanders were nor their regimental unit designation. It is mentioned that some units were getting ammo resupplies for six hours, aka they were disorganized. Again, I can totally see how given the facts mentioned in the first paragraph. This seems reminiscent of Bjorn's April hike, The Division That Never Was. Johnston had to have known this state of disorganization, even before the battle began, and how it would/could bring massive confusion on the field. Pictured are Colonel John G. Coltart and Lt. Col. William Davidson Chaddick, 26th Alabama Infantry. The Major of the 26th Alabama at the time of Shiloh was Andrew D. Guinn/Gwin/Gwynne (several different spellings); Gwynne was severely wounded in the arm by a shell as noted in his service records. After Shiloh, he was appointed Lt. Col. of the 38th Tennessee Infantry.
  30. 2 points
    http://www.historynet.com/a-frolic-up-the-tennessee.htm#prettyPhoto Image of Lt. Seth Ledyard Phelps, US Navy. He commanded the Tyler, Lexington, and Conestoga on their naval raid after the fall of Fort Donelson. Neat article on naval activity setting the stage for the Battle of Shiloh.
  31. 2 points
    As to "The bill introduced by Senator Thurman for the relief of Col. Tom Worthington," the Columbia (TN) Herald & Mail 1878-05-03 indicated that Worthington delivered lectures as Sherman declined an inquiry. Two years later, the Chicago Tribune 1880-05-15 indicated that Worthington would get a cash payment ($962) to cover some of the period after his dismissal, but that he would get no court of inquiry from Congress. It would have been interesting if testimony had been given.
  32. 2 points
    Richard P. Derickson was a First Lieutenant in the 16th Wisconsin Infantry, Company K, at the time the Battle of Shiloh erupted. On that fateful Sunday of 6 APR 1862, he was at his duty station aboard "wharf boat" Iatan, acting in capacity of AQM for the Sixth Division (a position he had occupied since April 3rd, assigned by BGen Prentiss.) Part of Lieutenant Derickson's duties involved him creating and maintaining precise records, accounting for possession and distribution of Government stores... Kevin Getchell made use of Lieutenant Derickson's records in constructing his 2013 work, Scapegoat of Shiloh: the distortion of Lew Wallace's record by U. S. Grant. The author indicates that he "encountered the Derickson Papers at an auction, and purchased them." Exact copies of several of the documents created by LT Derickson are contained in Scapegoat of Shiloh. These records are valuable for determining activities of the embryonic Sixth Division in the days leading up to that contact in Fraley Field. Less well known: Kevin Getchell made copies of the original documents, and left those on file with Shiloh NMP https://www.jacksonsun.com/story/news/2015/04/02/shiloh-battlefield-commemorate-rd-battle-anniversary/70862666/ Jacksun Sun of 2 APR 2015.
  33. 2 points
    Pvt. James S. Matthews, Company C, 4th Illinois Cavalry (his rank at Shiloh was Private it appears). Matthews served as orderly for Gen. John A. McClernand at Shiloh. Residence Joliet IL; a 17 year-old Clerk. Enlisted on 10/7/1861 at Camp Hunter, IL as a Private. On 10/7/1861 he mustered into "C" Co. IL 4th Cavalry He was discharged for promotion on 10/31/1863 On 10/31/1863 he was commissioned into "A" Co. US CT 3rd Cavalry He was Mustered Out on 1/26/1866 Promotions: * 2nd Lieut 10/31/1863 (As of Co. A 3rd USCT Cavalry) * 1st Lieut 8/26/1865 He was described at enlistment as: 5' 7", light complexion, brown eyes, brown hair Other Information: born in New Jersey Sources used by Historical Data Systems, Inc.: - Illinois: Roster of Officers and Enlisted Men - Index to Compiled Military Service Records - Official Army Register of the Volunteer Force 1861-1865 - Illinois State Archives @ http://www.ilsos.gov/isaveterans/civilmustersrch.jsp (c) Historical Data Systems, Inc. @ www.civilwardata.com
  34. 2 points
    Interesting that the names of Grant's telegraph operator and Bodyguard/orderly are unknown for the Shiloh time period. Many General's would have more than one orderly, however, so that various messages could be carried at various times. Having said this, I imagine that if Thomas D. Holliday would not have been killed at Shiloh, that his service as Sherman's orderly would have been lost to history. His name is, probably, only remembered because he was killed while serving as Sherman's orderly.
  35. 2 points
    Of course Ozzy’s observation is correct. I heard this somewhere else recently that Prentiss sent out David Moore to reinforce Powell and wondered where that could possibly come from. One is left to surmise how anybody could arrive at that conclusion when Moore clearly stated in his report that it was an order from Colonel Peabody that sent Moore and five companies of the 21st Missouri to Powell’s aid. But it was interesting to note that Lt. Col. Woodyard did indeed put in his report; “I have the honor to report that on the morning of the 6th of April, before sunrise, General Prentiss ordered Colonel Moore, with five companies of our regiment, to sustain the pickets of the Twelfth Michigan Infantry.” Woodyard’s comment reinforced the fact that the situation was so chaotic that Woodyard did not even know it was Peabody that sent Moore out with the first five companies and that it was done to “sustain the pickets of the Twelfth Michigan Infantry.” I kept an eye out for a confirmation of Moore’s report concerning who ordered him out with five companies to reinforce Powell. I finally found it in the following letter written in 1883 by William French, who was there. Not only was he there but he was Moore’s adjutant. His short letter contains other interesting points that blow holes in the Shiloh revisionist ship that will aid in sending that ship down to the deep where it belongs. William French’s letter was published on April 12, 1883 in the National Tribune. Copies of the National Tribune are available online. Just google National Tribune and it should show up. It is a short letter so I typed it up and here it is. One Regiment that was Not Surprised. To the Editor National Tribune: “As the manner in which the battle of Shiloh was fought is now under discussion, I would like, with your permission, to relate what I know about it. There was at least one regiment, the Twenty-first Missouri, commanded by Colonel David Moore, which was not surprised. On Saturday morning, April 5th, the day before the battle, General Prentiss, commanding the division to which we belonged, held a review, and at that time some rebel cavalry were seen in the vicinity. In the afternoon he ordered Colonel Moore to take five companies of his regiment and reconnoiter on our front. We went out about a mile and found numerous traces of the presence of rebel cavalry. The inmates of a house which we visited told us that the rebels were in large force, and that we would be attacked the following morning. Colonel Moore reported this fact to Colonel Peabody, who commanded the brigade, and also to General Prentiss, but no notice was taken of it, except that the pickets were strengthened. The next morning found us up early and ready for orders, and presently Colonel Peabody’s adjutant arrived with instructions for Colonel Moore to take out five companies. The pickets had been fired on in the meanwhile, and the Colonel met them falling back. They reported a heavy force in front of them, and the Colonel sent back to camp for the remaining five companies, and taking the pickets with him marched to the front. We had gone about a mile, and were in sight of the house where we heard the afternoon before that we were to be attacked, when the rebels fired on us. Colonel Moore was shot twice. He dismounted and told me to take care of him and keep a sharp lookout. He formed his regiment in line of battle and the boys began to deliver a very rapid fire. At this time an orderly arrived from Colonel Peabody and wished to know whether Colonel Moore could hold his position until he could re-enforce him. Colonel Moore sent back word that he would; but no re-enforcements came, however, and for about an hour we held the ground alone. The Twenty-first Missouri never did better shooting than on that Sunday morning. It was on that field that Colonel Moore was wounded for the third time. A minie ball broke his leg below the knee, and he was taken back to the camp, and afterwards placed on a gunboat on the river, If, after all the fighting we went through that Sunday morning, any of our boys were shot down near their tents, I, for one, don’t pity them. They had plenty of warning. Colonel Moore held his ground faithfully and bravely, and justice indeed has never been done him for the part he took in the battle of Shiloh.” William French Athens, Mo. Co. F, 21stMo. Wiley Sword wrote in his book on page 138; “About 7 P. M. Moore advised Prentiss that the results of his reconnaissance were negative.” That is not what Prentiss wrote in his report nor is it what William French wrote in this letter. William French wrote that they found evidence of Rebel cavalry and were told by citizens that they would be attacked in the morning. Colonel Moore reported this information to both Colonel Everett Peabody and Brigadier General Benjamin Prentiss. The Shiloh revisionists want you to believe that Moore reported nothing to the front of the camps and that Moore’s report is why General Prentiss did nothing as Peabody harangued him about Rebels to the front of his brigade. But the record clearly shows that Moore reported the presence of cavalry and the reaction by Prentiss was to send out additional pickets to strengthen the picket line and authorize additional patrols that eventually culminated in the 3 a. m. patrol by Major James E. Powell and ordered by Peabody. While Prentiss authorized reconnaissance patrols he was unaware as to the timing of those patrols. I have found nothing to indicate that Prentiss was at Peabody’s camp on the night of April 5th. Peabody, Powell and others were taking their case to Prentiss at his headquarters. As it got later on the night of April 5th Peabody continued to receive reports that heightened his alarm and increased his anxiety to know just what was in front of his brigade. But Prentiss was not there and did not have the latest information that Peabody had. It is bewildering to hear revisionists claim that Moore reported that he found nothing actionable. Moore wrote in his report; “In pursuance of the order of Brig. Gen. B. M. Prentiss, commanding Sixth Division, Army of the West Tennessee, I on Saturday proceeded to a reconnaissance on the front of the line of General Prentiss’ division and on the front of General Sherman’s division. My command consisted of three companies from the Twenty-first Missouri Regiment—companies commanded by Captains Cox, Harle, and Pearce. A thorough reconnaissance over the extent of 3 miles failed to discover the enemy. Being unsuccessful, as stated, I returned to my encampment about 7 o’clock p. m. What Moore is referring to is that he did not find any Rebels that he could shoot. Moore does not relate that he found evidence of rebel cavalry but Prentiss wrote that in his report and acted on it by strengthening the picket line. Prentiss wrote “At about 7 o’clock the same evening Colonel Moore returned, reporting some activity in the front—an evident reconnaissance by cavalry. This information received, I proceeded to strengthen the guard stationed on the Corinth road, extending the picket lines to the front a distance of a mile and a half, at the same time extending and doubling the lines of the grand guard.” It should be noted that Moore is pretty specific about the afternoon patrol he took out. He even gave us the names of the commanders of the three companies he took out on the patrol. He makes no mention of going on patrol joined by Major James E. Powell as claimed by Wiley Sword in his book. The idea of a patrol going out with both Moore and Powell just makes no sense and is not backed up by any account that I can find. It is simply one of the figments of Sword’s imagination that has found its way into the narrative and gets repeated by other historians who just repeat another historian’s work without scrutiny. But Prentiss confuses the issue with his report because he gets events out of sequence. Prentiss wrote in his second paragraph: “Saturday evening, pursuant to instructions received when I was assigned to duty with the Army of West Tennessee, the usual advance guard was posted, and in view of information received from the commandant there of, I sent forward five companies of the Twenty-fifth Missouri and five companies of the Twenty-first Missouri Infantry, under command of Col. David Moore, Twenty-first Missouri. I also, after consultation with Col. David Stuart, commanding a brigade of General Sherman’s division, sent to the left one company of the Eighteenth Wisconsin Infantry, under command of Captain Fisk. At about 7 o’clock the same evening Colonel Moore returned, reporting some activity in the front—an evident reconnaissance by cavalry. This information received, I proceeded to strengthen the guard stationed on the Corinth road, extending the picket lines to the front a distance of a mile and a half, at the same time extending and doubling the lines of the grand guard.” The way Prentiss composed these paragraphs gives the impression that Moore returned at 7 o’clock p. m. from a patrol consisting of five companies of the Twenty-first Missouri and five companies of the Twenty-fifth Missouri. But that makes no sense and does not fit the timing given by Moore in his report. Moore clearly wrote that he returned to camp at 7 p. m. after leading the three-company patrol he took out 3 miles. It makes no sense that at dusk with night approaching Prentiss would order a huge patrol of ten companies to go mashing around through the woods in the dark. My view is when Prentiss stated “I sent forward five companies of the Twenty-fifth Missouri and five companies of the Twenty-first Missouri Infantry, under command of Col. David Moore, Twenty-first Missouri” he is not describing a patrol but rather he sent Moore forward with ten companies to strengthen the picket line. Prentiss stated years later that these troops were sent forward with the order to stay through the night and try to capture some Rebels if they could. At some point on the evening of April 5th communication ceased between Prentiss at his headquarters and what was occurring in front of Peabody’s brigade. Prentiss felt he had responded to information received by sending out additional pickets. When Prentiss retired to his tent he believed that the war god David Moore was out on the picket line with ten companies of troops. However, apparently the pickets returned to camp at some point. When Powell’s patrol moved forward at 3 a. m. Prentiss was unaware of that fact. When Peabody heard pretty heavy firing and wounded men came into camp informing him that Powell could use some help Peabody sent his adjutant to Colonel Moore and told him to go to Powell’s aid with five companies. Moore did so and encountered the retreating Powell on the road east of Seay Field. Moore believed the Rebels were just a patrol and that they could be beaten back if Moore had the other five companies of the 21st Missouri. Moore sent an orderly back to camp to have the other five companies of the 21st Missouri sent to him. But the orderly did not follow the command chain. The orderly did not go to Peabody but instead went all the way to Prentiss at his headquarters. Prentiss described the arrival of the orderly in a speech in 1882; “Early in the morning, on the 6th of April, 1862, it was my duty, from what I had learned, to feel the enemy. I had been admonished on the Friday evening before that battle that an enemy of some force was in our front. Not at 3 o’clock, but on the evening of Saturday, before the sun had set, the details were made, and the order given throughout my division to advance the pickets and strengthen them with additional numbers. I did send to the front the gallant Moore, with five of his companies—three at first, and doubting their ability to meet the enemy, I sent two more on my right. On my left two companies of the 18thWisconsin were advanced one mile to the front. In the center, one company of the 61st Illinois and one of the 18th Missouri were sent forward as extra pickets, with instructions to remain until daylight and see if they could not capture some of the marauders that had been engaged in committing depredations immediately in our vicinity. Early on that Sabbath morning, before (while seated at my breakfast news came to me from the gallant Moore) I had heard the musketry fired in front, and heard the skirmishing, an orderly came galloping into camp and said: “General, the compliments of Gen. Moore. He requests me to say to you that he has met the enemy. Send his other five companies and he will lick them.” That is the language that came to me. Gen. Prentiss sent those other five companies of his regiment to him.” The work “admonish” had a different meaning back in the 1800s. The meaning was more close to “informed” as nowadays it is deemed more critical to be “admonished.” Here it is 20 years after the battle of Shiloh and Prentiss related what he believed happened. Note Prentiss remembered sending “to the front the gallant Moore” “to advance the pickets and strengthen them with additional numbers.” Prentiss had no clue as to Powell’s patrol on the morning of April 6th and the available record, including his 1882 speech shows that Prentiss had no clue as to Powell’s patrol when they placed him in his casket in February of 1901. He never mentioned Powell’s patrol and Peabody’s involvement because he never knew. Prentiss believed that Colonel David Moore was at the front with five companies and when he got a messenger from Moore wanting the rest of his regiment that just reinforced Prentiss’s belief that Moore had been involved with the start of the fighting. Back to French’s short letter and the wealth of information it contains for our consideration. 1. 1. French described how Prentiss ordered Moore to take out an afternoon patrol. French wrote five companies but Moore stated just three in his report. French reported they found numerous traces of Rebel cavalry. This contradicts the revisionist claim that Moore found nothing. 2. 2. French described how they were informed by citizens that the Rebels had a large force and that the Union camp would be attacked in the morning. French wrote that Moore passed this information on to both Prentiss and Peabody but that no serious note was taken except to strengthen the pickets. Here is a first indication that French was unaware of Powell’s patrol. It is also the only source I have seen that informs us that not only did Moore alert Prentiss but also Peabody. 3. 3. French confirmed the fact that Moore received an order from Peabody to take out five companies and move to the front. French gave the reason for this order is that the pickets had been fired upon. A second indication that French was unaware of Powell’s patrol. In addition this observation supports Moore report that it was Peabody that ordered him forward. Both Colonel David Moore and his adjutant, William French, say Peabody ordered Moore forward with five companies and they were there. 4. 4. French wrote that Moore met the pickets falling back and stopped them while sending back for the other five companies of the 21st Missouri. This is the third indication that French was unaware of Powell’s patrol and concluded that the men they encountered had been on picket duty instead of a five company patrol that Peabody had ordered to the front. French made no comment but it has been noted that the orderly Moore sent back for the other five companies went to Prentiss and not Peabody. 5. 5. French described the location of their fight as the house they had visited the day before during their reconnaissance which is at Seay Field. Seay Field is not three miles from the camp of the 21st Missouri. Based on Moore’s description that he moved in front of Sherman’s division it appears that he advanced beyond Seay Field but where Moore actually went is open to question. 6. 6. French wrote of Peabody sending an orderly to ask if Colonel Moore could hold his position until Peabody could reinforce him. I have not seen that referenced anywhere else. Finally French declaimed that “Colonel Moore held his ground faithfully and bravely, and justice indeed has never been done him for the part he took in the battle of Shiloh.” Of that French is totally correct. Rather than receiving justice for his role in the battle of Shiloh Colonel David Moore now receives ridicule and mockery at the hands of the Shiloh revisionists. He is depicted as a liar and a buffoon who could not find his way through the trees in front of Peabody’s camp without losing his way. There is no better example of how Shiloh revisionism has adversely affected the modern history of the battle of Shiloh than reading about the opening of the fight in Keven Getchell’s Scapegoat of Shiloh. What a shame that readers of that book who are not familiar with the battle of Shiloh will believe any of what Getchell wrote concerning the opening of the fight. Getchell did Moore and Prentiss a severe injustice in his book because he followed the Shiloh revisionist mantra. With that I close this posting even though I have so much more to tell. But tomorrow is another day and how it came to be that Colonel David Moore has been falsely depicted as a liar and a buffoon will be revealed in an upcoming posting. Hank
  36. 2 points
    That is exactly it! Thanks Ozzy. Skelton, I remembered it was a distinct last name. I did not know other Henry's were used at Corinth. I could have sworn I saw it in print in a book, but, it could very well have been this article that I stumbled upon. I may be wrong, but I think most people think, "oh, Henry Rifle, they were blasting away like they do in Western movies". I have even seen Civil War reenactors carrying Henry rifles and they were just blasting away when shooting. I don't think this is historically accurate. I think the soldiers lucky enough to have these weapons, especially early in the war, would have been firing "somewhat fast", but still taking deliberate aim. Ammunition was not just laying around for this weapon. I can't see someone, especially Confederate, burning through ammunition when ammunition resupply would be a colossal issue. At Corinth, for Skelton, I think actually it would have been more than a colossal issue. If he ran out of ammo, there was probably NO resupply, and he would be left carrying a heavy paperweight if he did run out of ammo. I found the picture of Fisher mentioned in the article, holding his Henry rifle. Fisher, and the 10th Kentucky Partisan Rangers Cavalry, however, did not fight at Corinth. Their fighting was done in Kentucky for the most part. Still, incredibly rare and historically important image. I would imagine the most technologically advanced rifle on the field at Shiloh would be the Sharps rifle or carbine. But, I imagine Birge's Western Sharpshooters, along with other marksmen and sharpshooters, were carrying some finely crafted rifles as well, such as the Dimick rifle.
  37. 2 points
    25th Alabama Infantry account by Cpt. William P. Howell, Company I, 25th Alabama Infantry. He is referring to Pvt. Burton Jackson Waddell, Company I, 25th Alabama Infantry. I know this is just one account, but, pretty neat. I will here relate a little incident of a man in my company. In the summer of ’61 when the company was being raised at Oak Level one B.J. Waddell who had just returned from Texas joined our company and had a fine rifle gun which he had secured in the west and insisted that he must carry it to shoot yankees and in our first engagement which I have already described, having shot his rifle a few rounds and while on his knees trying to reload, a yankee bullet struck him in the heel, which disabled him in the balance of the war and while he is still living and resides near Anniston, Alabama. I don’t think he has ever recovered from that gun shot.
  38. 2 points
  39. 2 points
    "Battle at Pittsburg Landing" letterhead, available in 1862. At the below link, "Milgram Civil War" has accumulated over one hundred patriotic covers and letterheads, including battle scenes (and a different sketch of Pittsburg Landing, with steamers and gunboats in the background) and noteworthy persons (including Abraham Lincoln, Ellsworth, Flag-officer Foote, U.S. Grant, Halleck, McClellan & Halleck, Jefferson Davis... The pdf takes about five minutes to load, but is worth the wait: http://www.rfrajola.com/MilgramCW/MilgramCW.pdf Civil War patriotic Letter designs And not wanting to neglect the Confederate contribution to patriotic Letter and envelope designs: http://www.trishkaufmann.com/confederate-patriotics.php
  40. 2 points
    Awesome image! Where did you find that one! Of course the 14th by Shiloh were in blue jackets-- But a great image. Don did Shiloh, if I remember, because people at that time were asking for something Western. He had a hard time finding how Johnston was dressed at Shiloh-- after much research he came with this rendition. The Arkansas troops, their uniforms are based on research done by myself and Jerry Coats of Gettysburg. Jerry dug out the ordnance and clothing records in the National Archives. Using some photos and flag research we put it all together for this painting. Jerry said his Western stuff just did not sell as well as his Eastern Battlefield paintings and prints. Remember when it was all Gettysburg and Antietam 25 years ago!!! Not so much today, but that was the way it was back then. I will fill in the gaps. I did do the research for 10 Western figures for Don.-- Tom
  41. 2 points
    Grant's Greatest Strength From study of U.S. Grant's military history in the West during the Civil War, what becomes apparent is the General's aggression, drive and determination to take the fight to the enemy. Belmont -- initially flagged as a "demonstration in vicinity of Fort Columbus" -- was converted by Grant into a highly successful raid. Fort Henry was such an obvious target that newspaper reporters, all during the month of January, were conjecturing when that Confederate fort would be attacked. And Fort Donelson was merely the logical next step, after the capture of Fort Henry. Following the capture of Fort Donelson, the logical next step was "occupation of Nashville" (a major source of supply for the Rebel Army.) But, General Grant saw unedifying vacillation on the part of his Federal counterparts (Buell and Halleck, in particular), and took measures into his own hands to press for Nashville's occupation. First, Grant suggested to Major General Halleck that Nashville be taken. Then, finding no obvious plan in work, Grant suggested he could take Nashville. Finally, Grant determined that Nashville's occupation was needlessly being delayed; and took measures to "fix that problem" U.S. Grant told Halleck that he was going to Nashville (and added the proviso, "Unless you specifically prohibit my going.") He looked for an opportunity... and found it: the arrival of Nelson's Division, sent to assist in capture of Fort Donelson (and now, technically, Nelson's Division was a part of Grant's Army) Nelson's Division, in convoy aboard seven transports steaming up the Cumberland River, was deemed by Grant as superfluous; and labelled by Grant as "no longer needed." Therefore, General Grant thought it best to "return to sender" Nelson's force, by re-directing the flotilla a little further up the Cumberland, with new destination: Nashville. When Brigadier General William Nelson stepped ashore on February 25th he was the first Union general officer to enter the former Confederate capital of Tennessee. He technically belonged to Grant, who was in process of "returning him to the Army of the Ohio." (Which is why there is confusion to this day IRT who occupied Nashville?) To sum up, General Grant's greatest strength was his ability to "see opportunity, and exploit opportunity." (Drive, determination, aggression, persistence... were merely character traits used as tools by Grant to develop opportunity.) My take on U.S. Grant Ozzy Reference: Badeau's Military History of U.S. Grant (1867) pages 56 -61.
  42. 2 points
    Or imagine if Johnston had a balloon at his disposal. I imagine he would have been more skeptical about launching an attack.
  43. 2 points
    All, I know this is a Shiloh board, but, a little "after action report". Mona was in my neck of the woods here at Stones River and I was able to give her a tour of the battlefield. A little insert here, if anyone is ever in the area and wants a tour, let me know and I will be glad to show you around. I guess this is also a, "Shiloh is lucky" moment. I was not happy to report to Mona, well, telling her, "don't get too excited, this ain't Shiloh". Tragically, in the 1890's there was a desire to create a National Military Park at Stones River almost as large as Shiloh. The move would have created a park of roughly 3,100 acres. Today, I think we roughly have 700 acres. Size wise, what the park has today is roughly, for a Shiloh comparison, Grant's last line, extending out to Cloud Field and over to the main battlefield entrance today. Similar to Shiloh, we had to drive through the battlefield to get to the area where the battle started. Stones River battlefield, is, well, it is gone. I lived in Murfreesboro 17 years ago, and since that time this battlefield has been paved over. When I say paved over, Stones Rivers' versions of the Peach Orchard, Rea Field, Fraley Field, Duncan Field, Jones Field, the Hornet's Nest, where most of the major fighting took place, is no more. I-24 goes through the heart of that area now. Cleburne's men attacked where Interstate 24 now exists. To the east of 24, it is now Walmart, an expanding hospital, hotels, places to eat, you get the picture. Even the last few open areas/fields are being developed at this very moment. The spot where General Sill was killed is now a bank, and across the street roughly 10 acres are being bulldozed for new construction. So many tons of dirt have been moved, that what the area originally looked like, versus now, well, there is no comparison. Small hills area bulldozed flat, so the terrain is just totally different. The area known as the Slaughter Pen, well, the park has half of it, on the other side of the road, a hospital expansion, and a soon to be 4 lane road. In the map attached, where it says Roberts(Bradley), marked by the X, I was lucky enough to make several evening/nighttime trips last fall (with permission), and found the bullets and canister you see. The mound of dirt I am standing by, I found a Williams Cleaner bullet in the pile, I just eyeballed it laying there. The pile itself was literally 2 stories high. Dropped bullets, fired bullets, artillery shell fragments, percussion caps, you name it, lots of stuff came from that area. People were finding tons of bullets just laying on top of the ground once the bulldozer went through. At Shiloh, we know almost exactly where specific regiments went through. At Stones River, because of the destruction, you can only form vague generalities. There is a Blue/Gray magazine with an in depth article, and tons of maps, about Stones River. But, because of people metal detecting, and relics found including a Mississippi button, the maps in the magazine appear to be incorrect. Not off by a lot, but off by up to 300 meters or more in some spots. Heavy traffic in the area makes stopping to get out and look difficult as Mona can testify to for sure. Sadly, I think we are just a generation or two away from a time when nobody will have much of an idea of where actions took place. Somewhat like, "well, so and so troops passed through this area at this intersection by the gas station, or, it could have been down 3 blocks by the McDonald's, we just don't know." I was able to show her some areas off the park where we know exactly how troops moved. And, naturally, you can see with good confidence where troops moved within the park. Other areas, with no places to pull over, you have to "tell the story" as you drive by, but again those are mainly off park property. I was able to show her 2 houses, still standing, that were used as field hospitals. But, we had a good time for sure. I tell you, we are lucky to have Shiloh so intact! Stan
  44. 2 points
    According to The History of the Orphan Brigade Edward Porter Thompson, Price C. Newman of Louisville was elected 2nd lieutenant in November, 1861, and was elected captain at the reorganization of May 15, 1862. He participated in all of the major engagements of the Orphan Brigade and died in Louisville on July 30, 1894. (page 802) https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=uc1.b4519380;view=1up;seq=1213
  45. 2 points
    i was just thinking after seeing the list of all the boats that wee churning up/down stream. wonder how this would have developed if this troop accumulation had been say in aug/sept..when its hot and very dry...the river would not be very navigatable to support this .before the river was channelized/dams built one could ride your horse accross in several spots.
  46. 2 points
    Another interest of T. M. Hurst: Steamboats. In particular, steamboats that were involved in transporting troops and armaments to Savannah and Pittsburg Landing in the build-up of Federal force during March and April 1862; those steamers present April 6th; and those that arrived (and departed) shortly after Battle of Shiloh commenced: (Found in Confederate Veteran, vol.1 page 180.)
  47. 2 points
    Thanks for putting this series together. The general feeling now is that the wounded were very badly handled at Shiloh (and many, many were) yet there were also experienced surgeons who worked tirelessly to do the best they could. Doctors of that era were strong anatomists and some, with that knowledge plus experience coupled with dexterity, did save lives with tourniquets and amputations. If only Pasteur and Lister had come a decade or so earlier. A.S. Johnson almost certainly could have been saved with a simple tourniquet if he had not sent his surgeon away to treat others. Surgeon General William A. Hammond made a valiant attempt to enforce the ancient edict of "first do no harm" by removing calomel and tartar emetic from the Army formulary (May 6, 1863). But that was a year after Shiloh. The resulting "Calomel War" was part of the reason for Hammond's short tenure. Dr. Letterman's ambulance groups were a huge innovation.
  48. 2 points
    Ozzy, Thanks, that is impressive! I guess Loren and myself had a similar hobby. Neat to see him in an obviously early war photograph. I guess I should have been more precise on my post. The images I have posted, well, I am really looking for pre-war or wartime images of soldiers who were killed, wounded, or captured during the Shiloh campaign. I have added a few that do not fall in to this category, but these were either Surgeons/Doctors that would have treated the wounded, and one or two of men with research worthy wartime accounts of Shiloh. I guess I "could" create an album of Shiloh participants, that would be a massive album to say the least, ha! Stan
  49. 2 points
    Hello Bradford, I read that in 1866 the bodies of 244 Union prisoners were removed to Andersonville Cemetery and placed in section B. 160 of the bodies were unidentifiable. There is the possibility that some were moved to the local Rose Hill Cemetery. The site of the prison was never used as a fairgrounds again and became a rail yard in 1870.
  50. 2 points
    Mona Thanks for the more thorough examination of General Lew Wallace's Expedition against the Mobile & Ohio R.R. (destruction of trestle work between Bethel and Brown Station accomplished March 12th 1862.) It is evident from the tone of General Wallace's report that he was pretty pleased with the result achieved by Major Hayes and his 5th Ohio Cavalry. Unfortunately for the wrecking party, Southern railroad navvies were skilled and innovative at repairing damaged rail lines: it is reported that trains were running over that "section of torn up trestle" by March 16th [see March 16th 1862 Letter of Lieutenant Benjamin J. Gaston, 1st Alabama Battalion (Letter No.35 page 3) http://acumen.lib.ua.edu/u0003/0003915?page=1 ]. Part of the reason for quick repair: the repair workshops for the M & O Railroad were just to the north at Jackson. The other reason: it appears when Major Hayes removed the steel rails, they were simply tossed off the embankment, into the swamp. Enterprising workers, after restoring the trestle, simply retrieved those rails and put them back into place... which is why subsequent railroad raids involved bonfires and steel "bow-ties." Cheers Ozzy
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