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Showing most liked content on 08/10/2018 in all areas

  1. 1 point
    Over on the Shiloh Discussion Facebook page, we had a recent announcement - I am not sure why it wasn't shared here. https://www.facebook.com/events/271131020312173/ Our annual Shiloh adventure with historian, author, and former Shiloh park ranger, Tim Smith. This year's hike will focus on the Confederate army's Alabama troops.Price: $30 per person. Pay on the day of the hike, prior to starting. (Failure to pay could possibly result in a situation known as "lost in an unknown ravine.")Probable starting/ending point: Ed Shaw's, just south of the park at the intersection of state highways 22 & 142. (We'll firm this up well before the hike.) Lunch (included): Sandwiches, drinks, and snacks, courtesy of long-time SDG member Mona Henson. (Be sure to thank her. She always more than earns it.) Bonus treats: Cookies and snickerdoodles! Courtesy of SDG member Jeani Cantrell. (Ditto on the earned thank-yous.) Lunch location: Visitor's Center area. Usually lasts around an hour. (Side-note: Please do not get between the SDG admin and the snickerdoodles. He's reportedly a little weird about this.) Hike Summary: We'll be following in the footsteps of Alabama's soldiers, and learn about their various experiences in this turning-point battle that would define the rest of the Civil War.We'll start at the south end of the park and work our way east and north, before crossing Dill Branch and heading toward the snickerdoodles....or rather, toward lunch. Then off across Tilghman Branch and the west side of the battlefield, before turning back to the south and our starting point.(Note - See the Discussion tab above for a map and written outline of our route through the park.)We'll be covering the better part of the park, and will be off the paved roads most of the time. If the idea of seeing and experiencing areas of the park most people will never see appeals to you, this is an excellent way to do so with some like-minded folks. Terrain will range from easy to "You can't be serious!" Sturdy footwear is strongly recommend. We'll be crossing over some very uneven ground, through the woods, across creeks and ravines, including Tilghman Branch, as well as the terrifying legend itself, Dill Branch Ravine. (Exaggerating for effect. Mostly. ) Going on past hikes, we should likely finish up somewhere between 4 p.m. & 6 p.m. We've had one hike end about 4:00, and two that finished with flashlights. But they were fun. I'm looking forward to seeing everyone in November, and I hope you decide to join us. We always have a good time, learn something new that heightens our understanding, and Tim never fails to do an excellent job. This year will certainly be no different. Hope to see you there.
  2. 1 point
    one just never knows when the anser will be discovered..very interesting find!
  3. 1 point
    That is exactly it! Thanks Ozzy. Skelton, I remembered it was a distinct last name. I did not know other Henry's were used at Corinth. I could have sworn I saw it in print in a book, but, it could very well have been this article that I stumbled upon. I may be wrong, but I think most people think, "oh, Henry Rifle, they were blasting away like they do in Western movies". I have even seen Civil War reenactors carrying Henry rifles and they were just blasting away when shooting. I don't think this is historically accurate. I think the soldiers lucky enough to have these weapons, especially early in the war, would have been firing "somewhat fast", but still taking deliberate aim. Ammunition was not just laying around for this weapon. I can't see someone, especially Confederate, burning through ammunition when ammunition resupply would be a colossal issue. At Corinth, for Skelton, I think actually it would have been more than a colossal issue. If he ran out of ammo, there was probably NO resupply, and he would be left carrying a heavy paperweight if he did run out of ammo. I found the picture of Fisher mentioned in the article, holding his Henry rifle. Fisher, and the 10th Kentucky Partisan Rangers Cavalry, however, did not fight at Corinth. Their fighting was done in Kentucky for the most part. Still, incredibly rare and historically important image. I would imagine the most technologically advanced rifle on the field at Shiloh would be the Sharps rifle or carbine. But, I imagine Birge's Western Sharpshooters, along with other marksmen and sharpshooters, were carrying some finely crafted rifles as well, such as the Dimick rifle.
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