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  1. 3 points
    I located Sgt. William H. Busbey's post-war article about his being near Grant's Savannah headquarters and on Tigress during the trip to Pittsburg Landing on April 6th in the Chicago Inter-Ocean. Some obvious errors make it not completely reliable, and it may be completely unreliable, but it does make for interesting reading: "I was at Savannah in April, 1862, associated with the work of the Adams Express company . Myself and another young man employed in the same office were sleeping on the night of April 5 in a house in Savannah three or four blocks from the river. General Grant's headquarters at Savannah were in a house very close to the river. We were on higher ground than he was, and about daylight on the morning of April 6 the young man sleeping with me jumped out of bed with the exclamation, 'There's firing up at the Landing.' We could hear very distinctly the boom of cannon, and when we went to the east window we could hear, or thought we could hear, the sound of musketry. Pittsburg landing was nine miles away, but in the still morning air the roar of musketry came to us." "We dressed hurriedly, ran down to General Grant's headquarters, where we found General Webster, chief of artillery, in his night shirt on the porch listening intently to the sound of firing. We saw him run into the house, and another officer came out with him. They listened a minute, ran in again, and General Grant came out in his night dress. The three figures stood like statues while Grant listened, and then the General gave an order that put everything in a whirl. Ned Osborne of Chicago was at that time in command of Grant's headquarters guard, and under excitement he was a very active man." "In a few minutes staff officers were awake and dressed, the escort was mounted and ready to go, and the General and staff boarded at once the steamer Tigress. I remembered as I looked over the steamers at the landing tht the Tigress was the only vessel that had steam up, and comprehending that Grant would go on that vessel, my comrade and myself went down and climbed on in advance of the General and his staff. There was a ittle wait for the escort and horses of the officers, but when all were on board the steamer did not move. Inquiry developed the fact that neither the captain nor the pilot was awake or had received any notice of the journey. They were stirred up in short order, and soon the Tigress started up the river for Pittsburg Landing." "About four miles above Savannah we came to Crump's landing. General Lew Wallace, in command of the division at that point, was on the steamer Jessie K. Bell. When we came up within fifty yards of the Bell, Grant shouted to Wallace, asking if he had any news from the front. Wallace shouted back saying that a courier had just arrived with the report that Sherman had been attacked by a heavy force. Grant, with great intensity of manner, asked: 'Does the dispatch say a heavy force?' Wallace replied that it did and Grant ordered the captain of the Tigress to make all possible speed for Pittsburg Landing." "As we started General Wallace shouted in surprise: 'General Grant, have you no orders for me?' and Grant, after thinking a moment, shouted back, 'Hold yourself in readiness to march.' Then we steamed away, but in a few minutes Ross came to me and said: 'It is a general attack this time, sure.' I asked him how he knew and he said that Captain Baxter had just received orders from Grant to take a steam tug and carry orders back to General Wallace to move at once and take position on the right of the Union force engaged in battle. We arrived at Pittsburg Landing in a short time and General Grant rode away at once toward the front." [The article went on about Busbey's experiences in the battle, including hauling guns up the bluff for Webster, the boats in the river, and Mother Bickerdyke.]
  2. 3 points
    My photos from this past weekend's Epic Trek are HERE if anyone is interested. Great time of hiking, learning, and fellowship.
  3. 2 points
    The 47th Tennessee Infantry were the only reinforcements the Confederates received on the 2nd day of the Battle of Shiloh. This article is neat summation of the 47th Tennessee, the weapons they carried, and their action in the battle. Interesting short piece to read. https://emergingcivilwar.com/2016/09/08/the-47th-tennessee-infantry-at-shiloh/ Below: Col. Munson Hill of the 47th Tennessee Infantry, wearing fraternal garb.
  4. 2 points
    Of more importance to the Battle of Shiloh is the observation of General Bragg as to the condition of the Confederate Army concentrating in Corinth. Bragg was appalled at the supply situation and the discipline of the troops. He called them, "a mob" and not an Army. He was ordered to get them some training and to do his best to prepare them for Battle. Their weapons were inferior. They had plenty of cannons, but not enough trained crews to man them. A point to make for the Battle of Shiloh-- Johnston went in on a hope and a prayer that surprise and the bayonet would win the day. Braxton Bragg agreed with that after what he witnessed. Not saying the Southerners were not brave or worthy, just that they were thrown into Battle with little formal training and a lack of needed supplies-- Class A firearms one of them...
  5. 2 points
    As we know, after his defeat at Pea Ridge, Arkansas (also known as Elkhorn Tavern) Major General Earl Van Dorn of the Trans-Mississippi was requested to support the forces of General Albert Sidney Johnston in Tennessee… but there was no apparent urgency in the request. Van Dorn arrived at Memphis about 8 April 1862 and stopped at The Gayoso House. Also in Memphis was Mrs. Mary Ann Webster Loughborough, whose husband James, was a Captain on the Staff of Brigadier General Cockrell. Mary Webster of New York married James Loughborough in Kentucky a few years earlier; then the couple moved west and established themselves in St. Louis, Missouri (and subsequently gravitated towards the Rebel cause.) In early April 1862 Mrs. Loughborough wrote the following letter to a friend, revealing the presence of notable Confederates in Memphis: Gayoso House, Memphis, April, 1862. My dear J——: I am just in from dinner; and you would be amused to see the different faces—I might as well say the different appetites; for the Army of Missouri and Arkansas have been undergoing rigorous fasts of late; and the little episode of the battle of Elkhorn and the consequent privations have helped not a little the gaunt appearance of these military characters. All eat, eat rapidly; from General V—— D—— down to the smallest lieutenant, whose manner of playing the epicure over the different dishes ordered, is a study. The confidential consultations with the waiter over them, together with the knowing unconsciousness of bestowing his small change, almost convinces me that he is a brigadier-general, or a colonel, at least. You see streaming in constantly this tide of human beings, to eat, stare at the ladies, talk, and order much wine in the excitement of military anecdotes; for you must understand that a civilian is a “rara avis” amid the brilliant uniforms of the dining room. Yet, amid all this mass and huge crowd, the majority are polished gentlemen, who have evidently seen much of the world, and who are men of purpose and character. General V—— D—— and staff sit not far from me—looked at rather jealously by the Missourians, as ranking and commanding them over their favorite general. Yet, he always treats the old general with the utmost consideration and courtesy. On the other side sits General P——, with his kind, benevolent face. The poor old gentleman finds at the table his lightest reserves become his heaviest forces: nearly all his staff are about him. And, as I sit half amused at the expression of some faces, and thinking deeply of the mute, yet determined impress of character on others, two gentlemen come in—one in plain citizen’s clothing, with heavy black beard and high forehead—with stooping gait and hands behind him. I am told he is Governor J——, of Missouri. His face puzzles me—it is thoughtful and singular. By his side, with tall, lithe, slender figure, fully erect, walks General J—— T——. You will scarcely think it possible that this is the so-frequently talked of J—— T——. I thought him an ordinary man, did not you? Yet, this is anything but an ordinary man. The keen dark eye sweeps the room as he enters, taking us all in at a glance—a quick, daring, decisive, resolute face. I can make nothing more out of him. Yet, there is more of thought and intellect than you see at first. He is dressed in full uniform, with sword and sash, and has quite a military air. There are many Saint Louisians here; you see them scattered around the tables quite plentifully. General C—— is among the number. He sits at some distance, and looks quite worn and sad. You know—do you not?—that he is the father of young Churchill Clark, who was killed at Elkhorn. Have I ever told you his history? It is this: He graduated at West Point in the commencement of the war; and knowing and having a great admiration for General P——, he joined him at once: he was put in command of some artillery; and showing himself a youth of courage and ability—for he was only twenty years old—his command was increased. Throughout the constant trials and sufferings of the campaign, he showed himself equal in courage, daring, and judgment, to many older heads. He was particularly beloved by General P——. At Elkhorn, as ever, his battery sustained itself with coolness and bravery. As the general rode by, he said some cheering words to young Clark, who took off his cap and waved it, saying, “General, we will hold our own,” or words to that effect, when a ball sped from the enemy, and crashed in the young, ardent brain as he spoke. I have been told that the general was affected to tears. He knelt by his side, vainly seeking for some trace of the strong, young life, but the pulses were stilled forever; and Churchill Clark lay a stiffened corpse in the long, wet grass at Elkhorn. And so his father sits silent and alone, and all respect the grief that none can assuage. In a few days we leave. The gentlemen all go to Corinth, where a battle, in all probability, will take place before long. Fort Pillow can hardly hold out, under the daily bombardment that we hear from the gunboats; and if it falls, Memphis, on taking leave of the Confederate officers, will usher in the Federal to quarters in the Gayoso. Adieu.
  6. 2 points
  7. 2 points
    Thanks for this. Another little piece of Civil War Chicagoiana to add to my collection. Rumsey was late to his own funeral...but for a poignant reason.
  8. 2 points
    Great photo... and of benefit to learn that the significant action in the Plum Orchard has finally been recognized... 🙂
  9. 2 points
    maybe due to the addition of "Plum Orchard Rd"
  10. 2 points
    There are two pieces of communication (one constructed on April 5th, and the other generated on April 6th 1862) both of which are important in their own way to explain “how the Battle of Shiloh unfolded.” And both documents have "issues." The first item is a telegram constructed at St. Louis and sent under signature of Major General Henry Halleck on Saturday 5 April 1862. Fitting Halleck’s style of issuing concise orders, the two-line telegram begins by listing the recently promoted Major Generals by order of seniority: Buell, Pope, McClernand, C.F. Smith, Wallace. The inclusion of John Pope is significant because Major General Pope would soon join the Advance on Corinth. And the place held by John McClernand (ahead of Charles Ferguson Smith) may have come as a surprise to Major General Ulysses S. Grant… but no matter, as the late formal notice of MGen McClernand’s seniority did not provide opportunity to ‘Provide him with benefits of seniority to which he was entitled” i.e., the Shell Game played by Generals Grant, Smith, Sherman and Captain McMichael had worked perfectly; and now, at this late hour, McClernand would be notified in due course of his official seniority (likely after U.S. Grant established his HQ at Pittsburg Landing… When McClernand operating as “acting commander” had odds somewhere between Slim and None.) The second line of Halleck’s telegram reads: “You will act in concert [with General Buell] but he will exercise his separate command, unless the enemy should attack you. In that case you are authorized to take the general command.” The wording of this second line, giving Grant emergency authority over Buell in case of attack by Rebels, has significant implications. And yet, when the conduct of Day Two at Shiloh is closely examined, there is nothing more significant in regard to General Grant exercising command, than, “You take the left; and I’ll take the right” during the advance of Monday morning (coordination at its most minimal.) Which leads one to ponder: When did General Grant receive this telegram from Henry Halleck? If it was sent by telegraph from St. Louis late morning of April 5th, it likely arrived at the Fort Henry telegraph office before noon. If a steamer picked up the mail and telegraph traffic at 1 p.m., (perhaps the Minnehaha) then the 5 April telegram would arrive about midnight… plenty of time for Grant to read and understand the contents. But, at 2 p.m. on Sunday, April 6th, where was this telegram from Halleck? The cool indifference shared between Grant and Buell (with Buell simply left at the waterfront, while Grant headed away west to take care of business) does not represent “someone in possession of an important telegram, giving them extraordinary authority.” Instead, it seems to indicate General Grant has not yet received the telegram; or he has seen it… but left it behind at the Cherry Mansion. The second communication was constructed on Sunday morning by Captain A.S. Baxter, the AQM for Grant’s Army, as he rode the steamer Tigress north to relay Grant’s orders (likely relayed from Grant, through Captain John Rawlins, to Baxter.) Finding the orders complex and difficult to remember in detail, Captain Algernon Baxter scanned the floor of the Ladies’ Cabin, found a soiled bit of paper, and wrote the orders (as he best remembered them) onto that scrap (later recorded as “containing a heel mark and tobacco stain.”) Upon arrival at Crump’s Landing, Captain Baxter found Lieutenant Ross – Aide to Major General Wallace – waiting. The two rode away west and reported to MGen Wallace at, or just before 11:30 a.m. Captain Baxter presented General Wallace with the impromptu order; Wallace asked why it was not signed. Baxter explained he “created the memorandum, himself, out of fear he would “forget some detail” unless he did so.” General Wallace passed the “written order” to his Staff, and asked Baxter about the current state of affairs [Baxter left Pittsburg Landing between 10 and 10:30.] Captain Baxter replied, “We are driving them.” General Wallace was satisfied; Wallace’s staff officers were satisfied. The order was accepted, and Captain Baxter took his departure within three minutes of arrival at Stony Lonesome. Captain Frederick Kneffler, Lew Wallace’s AAG, wound up with the “written order.” He tucked it under his sword belt… and subsequently lost it. Ever since, the loss of that written order, or memorandum, has been significant because it would provide tangible proof of what Major General Wallace had been ordered to do. And, it is not difficult to envision the memorandum, jiggling loose from Captain Kneffler’s sword belt, and blowing away… to be beaten by heavy rain that night; ultimately washed into the Snake River, then Tennessee River… lost forever. But, paper was in short supply, always. Letters by soldiers were often written making use of every millimetre of space, including margins and borders. As likely as the memorandum being lost forever, it was just as likely noticed, clinging to trampled stubble, by some soldier… one of thousands following behind Kneffler on his horse. This soldier would have snatched it up, and possibly sent it as souvenir with his own letter, a few days later. My point: there is every chance that the Lew Wallace memorandum from Baxter still exists, contained in a box of Civil War letters and paraphernalia, and the owners have no idea what they have in their possession. But, with all the other material being revealed on a weekly basis, one day this piece of history might just surprise everyone, and re-emerge.
  11. 2 points
    [Part three of Corinth, interrupted] Grant’s operation, with HQ at Savannah was kept on the back burner: just active enough to keep Rebel commanders guessing, but not sufficiently robust to allow General Grant to take the reins pre-emptively. The first benefit to Grant from success further west was assignment of Benjamin Prentiss to command of the newly created Sixth Division (although Halleck tasked Brigadier General Prentiss with other duties enroute, delaying his ultimate arrival at Pittsburg Landing.) In addition, Grant was aware that Don Carlos Buell was marching south and west to effect a join at Savannah (but Grant was frustrated by the slow pace of the Army of the Ohio.) Still, these troop additions were approved by Halleck, and were part of the overall plan to initiate the Operation against Corinth, in the proper sequence… after Victory at Island No.10 (when another source of manpower (Pope), as well as ammunition and abundant supplies would be made available.) References: SDG topics “Just supposin’ begun 26 FEB 2018 and “Full Hospitals” begun 30 JAN 2018 for Prentiss tasks enroute to Savannah Tennessee. SDG topic “Grant’s six divisions” begun 1 DEC 2018 details growth of Pittsburg force. OR 8 pages 633 – 4 telegram (23 MAR 1862) in which Henry Halleck lays out his “Programme” for SecWar Stanton, which includes, “Pope’s progress is necessarily slow,” and, “I have directed General Grant to make no move until Buell’s column (now at Columbia) can form junction with him.” Also, Halleck asserts, “We must take Corinth in order to seriously injure Rebel communications.” [And Halleck proposes possible moves for T.W. Sherman (the other Sherman) and Benjamin Butler which “might take advantage of [Bragg’s Army] leaving Florida and Alabama.”] OR 8 page 631 communication of 21 MAR 1862 from MGen Halleck to F/O Foote: “Everything is progressing well on the Tennessee River towards opening your way down the Mississippi.” [Illustrates the “connected” nature of Halleck’s operations, and alludes to the “proper sequence” of those operations.] OR 8 page 643 telegram from Army AG Thomas to MGen Halleck of 25 MAR 1862: “BGen Thomas Davies has been assigned duty in Department of the Mississippi.” [In preparation for conduct of operations after success at Island No.10 Halleck has called for more trained general officers to assist, as part of Halleck’s program. General Thomas Davies will be assigned command of Second Division, following deaths of WHL Wallace… and C.F. Smith.] OR 8 page 649 telegram SecWar Stanton to MGen Halleck of 29 MAR 1862: “You will report without delay the strength and distribution of your command.” [Halleck’s response 30 March: “Buell 101,000 in KY and Tenn; Grant 75,000 in Tennessee; Pope 25000 at New Madrid; Curtis 23000 in Arkansas; Strong 9000 District of Cairo; Steele 6000 in Arkansas; Schofield 15000 District of St. Louis (including new regiments at Benton Barracks); Totten 4000 in Central Missouri; Loan 2000 in Northern Missouri; about 10000 men in Kansas, Nebraska and Colorado.”] And follows telegram of Halleck to Stanton of 28 MAR 1862 revealing “elevated level of sickness experienced by men on Tennessee River expedition” (and lays blame on brigade and regimental surgeons of volunteers.) One-in-three reported sick, and is of concern because Halleck intends to make use of Grant’s Army… soon. OR 8 page 660 communication MGen Halleck to F/O Andrew Foote of 5 APR 1862: “I shall want a gunboat at Cairo ready to go up the Tennessee River in the early part of next week.” [With the successful run of USS Carondelet past the guns of Island No.10 on April 4th, Halleck knows it is “a matter of days” before Pope crosses his army and forces the trapped Rebels to surrender (in rear of Island No.10).] OR 8 page 661 communication Halleck to MGen Samuel Curtis (Army of the Southwest) on April 5th 1862: “Price and Van Dorn will soon leave your front [and the great battle of the war is to be fought on the Tennessee River.]” OR 8 page 672 telegram Halleck to Stanton of 7 APR 1862: “Buell’s advance force has reached Grant; entire force will connect in two or three days” [sent before news arrived at St. Louis IRT Battle of Shiloh initiated early 6 APR 1862.] OR 8 page 676 communication of 8 APR 1862 from Assistant Secretary of War Thomas Scott to Henry Halleck, alluding to “sequence of events” after Surrender of Island No.10.
  12. 2 points
    and found in the area of this high ground were numerous springs...good water..army is fueled by coffee. unlike what was to be had in Corinth later...
  13. 2 points
    Then again, I don't know how much that time mattered. The Confederates were disorganized, thus part of the reason they stopped. Had they continued on the attack, being so disorganized, I venture that the disorganization would have caused even more ill coordinated attacks, and potentially, disaster for the Confederates, if that makes sense.
  14. 2 points
    Review of To Rescue My Native Land by Wm. T. Shepherd It is not often that letters and diaries compiled by artillerymen during the Civil War are encountered, and this collection is a gem: the “Civil War Letters of William T. Shepherd.” Native of Wisconsin, who enlisted in Chicago as Private in Taylor’s Battery B, 1st Illinois Light Artillery 16 July 1861, Private Shepherd (sometimes spelled Shepard) is a gifted, intelligent writer who sent letters to friends and family back in Illinois on a daily basis. Encountered in the many letters: · Camp life (and looking forward to letters, newspapers and parcels from home) · Details of duty (and October 1861 Skirmish at Fredericktown) in Missouri · Description of duty (and Christmas) at Bird’s Point, Missouri. Letter of 10 NOV 1861 describes participation in Battle of Belmont. Letter of 9 JAN 1862 reveals “everyone at Cairo, Fort Holt and Bird’s Point is under Marching Orders” (which everyone believes is for “somewhere down the Mississippi River…”) Instead, a feint is conducted to the east of Fort Columbus, which “confuses everyone”). Letter of 1 FEB 1862: under Marching Orders, again… 8 FEB 1862: describes “how easily their Fort Henry became ours.” 16 FEB: Letter begins “while besieging Fort Donelson” and describes previous four days of activity, and ends abruptly when orders arrive to “reposition the Battery.” (See 21 FEB letter.) 28 FEB: “Our Captain Taylor has just returned from a visit to Nashville…” 12 MAR: aboard steamer Silver Moon, going up the Tennessee River… 21 MAR: at Savannah, returning to steamer for move up river… 23 MAR letter written from Pitsburg Landing. “Arrived aboard John J. Roe. There are 75000 men at this place, and more arriving constantly…” 25 MAR: “Captain Taylor has been promoted, and Lieutenant Barrett is now in command of the Battery.” Letters of 8 APR and 14 APR 1862: aftermath of Battle of Shiloh. And more good news: Private William Shepherd (who was promoted to Sergeant Major by the end of the War) also kept a Diary… Cheers Ozzy To Rescue My Native Land: the Civil War Letters of William T. Shepherd (edited by Kurt H. Hakemer) Tennessee University Press 2005 (365 pages) is available at amazon.con and better libraries. [Limited access: https://books.google.com.au/books?id=a6HQRB6UimYC&pg=PA331&lpg=PA331&dq=israel+p.+rumsey+letter&source=bl&ots=JG_cwqaoUX&sig=dQa8blZoWwiMXVAQGfu3JkaSAHE&hl=en&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwiIg5yUx4nfAhUF448KHReGDdcQ6AEwBXoECAkQAQ#v=onepage&q=israel p. rumsey letter&f=false And for those able to visit Kenosha, Wisconsin: https://museums.kenosha.org/civilwar/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/2018/05/Wisconsin-Resources-for-Website.pdf Civil War letters and diaries on file
  15. 2 points
    Mona and Stan When first investigating the history of the officer in question, I encountered newspaper claims that "he had been a classmate of Henry Halleck." But, with a birth year of 1823, to have attended West Point in Halleck's Class of 1839 would have meant entering the Military Academy in 1835... when this "cadet" would have been twelve years old. Upon further investigation, numerous claims of "graduated with the Class of 1843" were uncovered: the same USMA Class as Ulysses S. Grant. As Mona points out, the Cullum Register is deficient because it only records graduates of West Point; and the term "alumnus" was used by West Point to indicate a graduate (while other universities applied the term to include students who had merely attended.) As regards "the difficulty in Missouri" leading to the removal of this officer from command, the arresting officer was Brigadier General Stephen Hurlbut. But Hurlbut was found to be "impaired" soon afterwards, and Brigadier General John Pope arrested Hurlbut (Hurlbut was sent home to Belvidere Illinois by Major General Fremont "to await orders.") And so the situation rested until November 1861, when Fremont was removed, and Henry Halleck was installed as commander, Department of the Missouri. Cheers Ozzy
  16. 2 points
    From the Civil War Diaries Collection at Auburn University comes this Shiloh battle record, compiled by L. I. Nixon of Limestone County, Alabama. Incensed by hearing of the Confederate defeats at Fort Henry and Fort Donelson, 38-year old Liberty Independence Nixon left his wife and seven children and joined Malone's Company... and on February 24th 1862 was on his way to Corinth. After a brief stay, Malone's Company of the 1st Battalion of Alabama Volunteers returned south to vicinity of Mobile Bay to gather supplies; then a return to Corinth on the M & O R.R. took place on March 4th. Camping a few days about a mile north of Corinth, Private Nixon and his fellows rode the train north to Bethel Springs (and may have heard the exchange of gunfire between Confederate soldiers and Lew Wallace's party, tasked with tearing up the railroad -- page 18.) Returning to Corinth on March 20th, Nixon indicates "they resumed the exact same camp ground, as before." And then, Private Nixon relates the story of "Beauregard's bodyguard finding a barrel of whiskey..." which led to Malone's Company being briefly assigned as bodyguard to General Beauregard. While in close proximity to Tishomingo Hotel, Private Nixon confirms "a rush" made on the hotel (also mentioned in Braxton Bragg's Letter of 20 March 1862.) Pages 24 - 27 reflect on camp life in Corinth. Page 27 records the units making up Gladden's Brigade: 1st Louisiana Infantry, 21st Alabama Infantry, 22nd Alabama, 25th Alabama, "Robisson's" Regiment of Artillery, and Nixon's unit, the 1st Battalion Alabama Volunteers commanded by Major Chaddick. Next day (March 30th) four new companies are added to the 1st Alabama Battalion -- now known as 26th Alabama Infantry Regiment. On page 28, the orders to cook three days' rations (3 April). Same day: "We left early and took up the line of march." Pages 28 - 30 recount the march north, the rain, and wagons getting mired in the mud. Page 31 records knowledge of the Picket Skirmish of April 4th (Private Nixon observed Yankee prisoners being moved south.) Pages 32 - 34 record the final approach towards the Federal camp; and about dark on April 5th Private Nixon and his fellows are sent forward on picket duty... The entire diary is only 46 pages long (and the first four pages are water-damaged from attic storage, so almost unreadable.) Fortunately, every page is transcribed at bottom: http://content.lib.auburn.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/civil/id/23854/rec/20 Private Nixon's Shiloh Diary.
  17. 2 points
    Liberty Independence Nixon, his findagrave page and his photograph. https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/25015250/liberty-independence-nixon
  18. 2 points
    I realize it is just one regiment in a large battle, but I often wonder if A. S. Johnston knew how somewhat unorganized many of the regiments in the Army were, i.e. the 26th Alabama Infantry. The organization was not led by Maj. Chaddick, but actually by Colonel John G. Coltart of Huntsville. I have posted before the letters of Lt. Benjamin J. Gaston of the 26th Alabama. Just 3 days before the battle, Gaston was writing and stated that he did not know the "number" (regimental designation) of his unit. I have seen other historians and writers erroneously attribute the leadership of the 26th to Chaddick rather than Coltart. My his memory always shine bright, but from memory in Shiloh Bloody April, even Wiley Sword mentions Chaddick being the commander of the unit. When Gladden's men stopped in the Federal camp, well, upon renewing the attack, at that point Coltart was wounded, and Chaddick took temporary control of the unit. Coltart received a severe foot wound, but, he had it tended to behind the lines and then returned to the fight. It seems amazing to me that many men went in to that fight not knowing who their commanders were nor their regimental unit designation. It is mentioned that some units were getting ammo resupplies for six hours, aka they were disorganized. Again, I can totally see how given the facts mentioned in the first paragraph. This seems reminiscent of Bjorn's April hike, The Division That Never Was. Johnston had to have known this state of disorganization, even before the battle began, and how it would/could bring massive confusion on the field. Pictured are Colonel John G. Coltart and Lt. Col. William Davidson Chaddick, 26th Alabama Infantry. The Major of the 26th Alabama at the time of Shiloh was Andrew D. Guinn/Gwin/Gwynne (several different spellings); Gwynne was severely wounded in the arm by a shell as noted in his service records. After Shiloh, he was appointed Lt. Col. of the 38th Tennessee Infantry.
  19. 2 points
    http://www.historynet.com/a-frolic-up-the-tennessee.htm#prettyPhoto Image of Lt. Seth Ledyard Phelps, US Navy. He commanded the Tyler, Lexington, and Conestoga on their naval raid after the fall of Fort Donelson. Neat article on naval activity setting the stage for the Battle of Shiloh.
  20. 2 points
    Sat, Nov. 3 forecast for those who believe that the weatherman is capable of predicting the weather more than an hour in the future: https://www.accuweather.com/en/us/crump-tn/38327/daily-weather-forecast/2085479?day=7
  21. 2 points
  22. 2 points
    As to "The bill introduced by Senator Thurman for the relief of Col. Tom Worthington," the Columbia (TN) Herald & Mail 1878-05-03 indicated that Worthington delivered lectures as Sherman declined an inquiry. Two years later, the Chicago Tribune 1880-05-15 indicated that Worthington would get a cash payment ($962) to cover some of the period after his dismissal, but that he would get no court of inquiry from Congress. It would have been interesting if testimony had been given.
  23. 2 points
    Richard P. Derickson was a First Lieutenant in the 16th Wisconsin Infantry, Company K, at the time the Battle of Shiloh erupted. On that fateful Sunday of 6 APR 1862, he was at his duty station aboard "wharf boat" Iatan, acting in capacity of AQM for the Sixth Division (a position he had occupied since April 3rd, assigned by BGen Prentiss.) Part of Lieutenant Derickson's duties involved him creating and maintaining precise records, accounting for possession and distribution of Government stores... Kevin Getchell made use of Lieutenant Derickson's records in constructing his 2013 work, Scapegoat of Shiloh: the distortion of Lew Wallace's record by U. S. Grant. The author indicates that he "encountered the Derickson Papers at an auction, and purchased them." Exact copies of several of the documents created by LT Derickson are contained in Scapegoat of Shiloh. These records are valuable for determining activities of the embryonic Sixth Division in the days leading up to that contact in Fraley Field. Less well known: Kevin Getchell made copies of the original documents, and left those on file with Shiloh NMP https://www.jacksonsun.com/story/news/2015/04/02/shiloh-battlefield-commemorate-rd-battle-anniversary/70862666/ Jacksun Sun of 2 APR 2015.
  24. 2 points
    Pvt. James S. Matthews, Company C, 4th Illinois Cavalry (his rank at Shiloh was Private it appears). Matthews served as orderly for Gen. John A. McClernand at Shiloh. Residence Joliet IL; a 17 year-old Clerk. Enlisted on 10/7/1861 at Camp Hunter, IL as a Private. On 10/7/1861 he mustered into "C" Co. IL 4th Cavalry He was discharged for promotion on 10/31/1863 On 10/31/1863 he was commissioned into "A" Co. US CT 3rd Cavalry He was Mustered Out on 1/26/1866 Promotions: * 2nd Lieut 10/31/1863 (As of Co. A 3rd USCT Cavalry) * 1st Lieut 8/26/1865 He was described at enlistment as: 5' 7", light complexion, brown eyes, brown hair Other Information: born in New Jersey Sources used by Historical Data Systems, Inc.: - Illinois: Roster of Officers and Enlisted Men - Index to Compiled Military Service Records - Official Army Register of the Volunteer Force 1861-1865 - Illinois State Archives @ http://www.ilsos.gov/isaveterans/civilmustersrch.jsp (c) Historical Data Systems, Inc. @ www.civilwardata.com
  25. 2 points
    Interesting that the names of Grant's telegraph operator and Bodyguard/orderly are unknown for the Shiloh time period. Many General's would have more than one orderly, however, so that various messages could be carried at various times. Having said this, I imagine that if Thomas D. Holliday would not have been killed at Shiloh, that his service as Sherman's orderly would have been lost to history. His name is, probably, only remembered because he was killed while serving as Sherman's orderly.
  26. 1 point
    Besides family, the people who know us best are those we attended school with. Here are a couple of observations of Ulysses S. Grant (one of which you've probably encountered already. But the other...) "One day at West Point, as our section in mathematics was marching to recitation hall, Frank Gardner produced an old silver-cased watch, about four inches in diameter. It, as a curiosity, was passed along from one lad to another... it chanced to be in Grant's hands as we reached the door of the recitation room, and he tucked it into his tunic and buttoned it up. The regular Professor was absent; Cadet Z. B. Tower occupied his chair. He sent four cadets to the blackboards, Grant being one. Grant quickly solved his math problem, and turned to begin his demonstration, when all of a sudden the room was filled with a sound not unlike a Chinese gong. All looked amazed, and Tower, thinking the noise was in the hall, ordered the door closed. And that only made the matter worse. Grant, with a sober countenance, continued his demonstration. The racket ceased, and shortly afterwards, so did Grant. Tower had no idea from whence the noise came (Gardner had accidentally set the alarm on the ancient timepiece concealed in Grant's bosom.) Tower's bewilderment, and Grant's sobriety afforded us much amusement." Rufus Ingalls (USMA 1843) was known at West Point as "the Prince of Good Fellows." During the Civil War, he served as Chief Quartermaster of the Army of the Potomac; and one night during Spring of 1865, at City Point, he and General Grant and a few others were sitting around their camp fire. Conversation had lapsed into silence, which after a while was suddenly broken by Grant exclaiming: "Ingalls, do you expect to take that yellow dog of yours into Richmond with you?" Ingalls nodded. "Oh yes, General. You see, he belongs to a long-life breed." Silence returned, but many of the witnesses had to remove themselves for a time...
  27. 1 point
    i do not knowhow to put a link here but yall can go to find a grave to see his headstone..the original is somewhat unique--at least to me--under his name has US and CSA
  28. 1 point
    Mona The other Federal units to recruit men from Savannah and Hardin County in March and April 1862 were the 40th Illinois (Hicks) the 46th Ohio (Worthington) the USS Lexington (Shirk) the USS Tyler (Gwin) and the USS Alfred Robb. The Roster for the 40th Illinois includes names of Tennessee men recruited into Company C, and Colonel Thomas Worthington recorded names of the Savannah men recruited into his Companies A, B, D, G, I and K (on a slip of paper he compiled a day or two after the Battle of Shiloh, because I believe the camp of the 46th Ohio was overrun and their records lost.) The three gunboats would all have names of recruits entered in their Logbooks. Unfortunately, only select pages of the Operational History (Ledger) of the 14th Iowa Infantry are available online… at the present time. As regards Lewis Sutton’s father, Philip: he survived the war, returned to Mount Pleasant, Iowa and lived until November 1880. Cheers Ozzy
  29. 1 point
    very interesting...many of whom were originally from tenn moved to tx after the war
  30. 1 point
    Fifty years after the end of the Civil War, an astute author realized that the men who had made History, and their stories were in imminent danger of being lost forever. So, Mamie Yeary set out across Texas (and had manuscripts sent her) to record as many “average Johnnies” as possible. Their stories, brief and poignant, leave the reader “wishing for more” …which may be possible, because many kept diaries; and almost all wrote letters during the war. And, with a name (and combat unit designation) we now have a starting point… especially for the scores of Confederate Shiloh veterans who made these pages: https://archive.org/details/reminiscencesofbv1year/page/1 Reminiscences of the Boys in Gray (1912) by Mamie Yeary. https://archive.org/details/reminiscencesofb00year/page/n5 Reminiscences (Vol.2) [See pages 428 - 9 William Lee 6th Arkansas; pp.515 - 7 John Middleton 23rd Tennessee, for examples of what is available by searching for "Shiloh." Also, pp. 884 - 890 lists almost every skirmish and battle in Tennessee (and surrounding pages list almost every skirmish, action and battle in every State during the 1861 - 1865 War.)]
  31. 1 point
    Very happy to hear you all had a wonderful trip!
  32. 1 point
    A small blog post today about my first trip to Shiloh. Shamed of myself that I had never been to this iconic and bucolic location previously! Shiloh!
  33. 1 point
    Oh, that was so helpful to me. My gggrandther was McKoins. You are wonderful Ozzy, thank you so much. Nice to meet you both
  34. 1 point
    Mona The 1983 Shelby Foote interview is mentioned on google in the following format: MPB Classics: Postscripts: Shelby Foote -- A 1983 conversation with Mississippi author and historian Shelby Foote and will be broadcast at 4:30 pm on Wednesday 9 JAN 2019: https://www.tvpassport.com/tv-listings/stations/pbs-mississippi-public-broadcasting/2200 (scroll down to 4:30 pm.) [Note: On closer examination, the "tvpassport.com" site automatically converted to Adelaide Time, so 4:30 was Australia Central Daylight Savings Time... which was over four hours ago. Don't know when Mississippi Public Broadasting intends to run the programme again...]
  35. 1 point
    #7---False..yes Grant did suffer with terrible migranes but alcohol was never used. He opted for mustard plasters and treatment like this.The migrane attacks did render him down and out which may have fulled the talk of drinking to point of passing out..but it was the migranes that laid him out.Also ,he contracted malaria in 1852 while in Isthmus of Panama and this condition also puts one to bed and even after"recovery" flare ups do return.So either medical condition or both arising at the same time would really prostrate him to sick bed.
  36. 1 point
    I would say the time from when CS troops stopped in the Federal camps until the attacks resumed, esp. on the Confederate center and right.
  37. 1 point
    On April 7, 1862, Assistant Surgeon Bernard J. D. Irwin, Army of the Ohio, established a 300 bed tent hospital at the far right of the Union Line in Cantrell Field. The surgeries were conducted in the Cantrell House. Other than the facts above, I know very little about this Shiloh tent hospital. Does anyone know how long the hospital existed? Were both Union and Confederate wounded cared for there? Did the Sanitary Commission assist in any way? How many soldiers died there? The Manassas Belle
  38. 1 point
    As far as can be determined, Julian Larke's was the first complete biography of U.S. Grant available to the public (published 1864.) The other early biographies: Henry Coppee 1864 brief 3-page article that appeared in United States Service Magazine, June edition Henry Coppee 1866 complete biography, Grant and His Campaigns Adam Badeau 1867 Military History of Ulysses S. Grant U. S. Grant 1885 Personal Memoirs of Ulysses S. Grant Links: Coppee article in SDG topic "Personalities" -- "U. S. Grant" Coppee https://archive.org/details/granthiscampaign01lccopp/page/n5 Badeau https://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/000465085 U.S. Grant https://www.gutenberg.org/files/4367/4367-h/4367-h.htm
  39. 1 point
    We're all familiar with the story: a man claiming to be a graduate of West Point, Class of 1843, found work assisting the Governor of his State following the Emergency at Fort Sumter. Then, this man talked his way into being appointed Colonel of one of the State's first infantry regiments of volunteers. Later, in Missouri, this officer had an encounter that resulted in him being briefly removed from command... but things were put right, and this officer arrived at Pittsburg Landing in time to participate in Battle of Shiloh... as a Brigade Commander. Name this man. Hint: NOT Ulysses S. Grant.
  40. 1 point
    Chicago Daily Tribune of Monday 31 MAR 1862 page one. Chigago Daily Tribune attempts to predict the future...
  41. 1 point
    Distances associated with above map (in miles) 210 Paducah to Savannah (via Tennessee River) 240 Cairo to Memphis (via Mississippi River) 165 Fort Henry to Pittsburg Landing (fourteen hours to Pittsburg Landing; eleven hours downstream to Fort Henry 9 Savannah to Pittsburg Landing (sixty minutes upstream; forty minutes downstream) 4 1/2 Crump's Landing (to Savannah, or to Pittsburg Landing) 18 Corinth to Union Camps at Pittsburg Landing 37 Savannah to Waynesboro (telegraph line on 3 APR 1862) 133 Nashville to Savannah (via Columbia and Waynesboro) (ten days of easy marching, good weather) 60 Savannah to Florence Alabama (via Tennessee River) 18 Cairo to Fort Columbus, Kentucky 64 Cairo to Island No.10 42 Cairo to Paducah (via Ohio River) 118 Savannah to Memphis (most direct available roads)
  42. 1 point
    The above image depicts a scene sketched at Pittsburg Landing in April 1862 that most have never seen before. What was "Parker's Office?"
  43. 1 point
    Good question, Mona... because there were two instances (one of which was likely made known to him by William Tecumseh Sherman.) The first was stated above: due to Grant's questionable performance (visiting Nashville without Halleck's permission) MGen Grant was removed from "command in the field," replaced by Brigadier General C.F. Smith (who was junior in seniority to Generals Sherman, McClernand and Hurlbut on 5 MAR 1862.) Smith was put in charge of the Tennessee River Expedition. The second instance was likely brought to his attention by Brigadier General Sherman -- who in January 1862 was 7th most senior Brigadier in the entire Volunteer Army, even ranking U.S. Grant and Don Carlos Buell. That "Shell Game" took place at Benton Barracks, shortly after MGen Halleck took command of the Department of the Missouri in November 1861, and involved William T. Sherman (recuperating from nervous breakdown), Stephen Hurlbut (needing to dry out from alcohol over-use) and William K. Strong (who was a businessman requiring more experience in leading military men.) During the three months these three generals served together at Benton Barracks, any one of the three was claimed to be "Commander" at Benton Barracks, to hide the real reason three brigadier generals were there, at a Camp of Instruction. References: OR 52 page 198 -- "General Sherman's mental and physical state is so broken that, for the present, he is unfit for duty" [General Halleck communication to General McClellan on 2 DEC 1861.] OR 8 page 514 -- "General Sherman was placed in command of Benton Barracks." OR 52 page 227 -- Special Orders No.28 of 21 MAR 1862: "Brigadier General Strong is hereby placed in command of the District of Cairo." [Until this assignment, General Strong had been "present" at Benton Barracks, since December 1861. Assigned to command of Benton Barracks by General Halleck, Strong reported that "when he entered the Commanding Officer's Quarters, where he assumed he was to lodge himself, he found General Sherman already there."] https://www.loc.gov/resource/mal.1264500/?sp=3 Letter of 24 OCT 1861 from William K. Strong to President Lincoln, detailing his work with General Fremont. SDG topic "They also serve, who stand and wait..." post of 20 FEB 2018 -- details of W.K. Strong service. https://www.amazon.com/General-William-K-Strong-Autograph/dp/B00JBNNK04 Letter of 12 NOV 1861 in which General Strong claims he is in command of Benton Barracks. OR 3 pages 156 - 157, 475 -- In August/ September 1861, Brigadier General Hurlbut got caught up in a shambles of on operation along the line of the Hannibal & St. Joseph Railroad in Northern Missouri, which resulted in him being placed under arrest and removed from command. Sent home to Illinois by General Fremont to await Court Martial, Hurlbut was still languishing in Illinois when General Halleck took command in Missouri in November. Halleck dropped the charges against Hurlbut, and at the suggestion of William T. Sherman (a close pre-war friend of Henry Halleck and Stephen Hurlbut) General Hurlbut was "assigned to Benton Barracks." Stephen A. Hurlbut: a Politician Turned General by Jeffrey Norman Lash, page 90. [Hurlbut arrived Benton Barracks on 1 JAN 1862.] OR 8 page 591 -- Henry Halleck in communication of 5 MAR 1862 to BGen Sherman refers to C.F. Smith as "Major General Smith."
  44. 1 point
    wonder where Grant witnessed Halleck assign an officer with less seniority to command more senior officers?
  45. 1 point
    This is rather intriguing. The first question that comes to my mind is wondering how many men were in the 1st Louisiana Cavalry at the time of Shiloh. This is all speculation as I do not have access right now to the OR's for guidance. Lots of what if's. I know many Alabama cavalry soldiers were "farmed out" as scouts, couriers, etc., and did not act together as a unit for all intents and purposes. I wonder if the same could be said of the 1st Louisiana Cavalry. If they operated as a solid whole unit, under Forrest, however, I do not see how they could be neglected in records; nor do I see how they could not be mentioned in Forrest's operations at Shiloh, particularly if they numbered over 100 men. The verbiage or rather how the story is articulated in the original article leads me to think they were on the Confederate right flank, near the river, the entire time. They may have not joined Forrest in his movements near the Sarah Bell cotton field. The story seems to mix "general Shiloh history" with the actions of the regiment. Although not as good as Fold3, civilwardata.com only lists one member of the regiment as being wounded. IF, again, IF, they only lost one man wounded, that does not seem to indicate they were in any thick fighting. One way or another, it seems to indicate that there were a lot of Confederate horsemen "operating" on the Confederate right and/or Forrest had more men under him than I thought.
  46. 1 point
    and to the left off this picture is Shiloh Battlefield Museum and a convience store and behind you a graveled foundation beginnings of the fire hall.
  47. 1 point

    From the album: Federals killed, wounded, or captured at Shiloh; and some who died in the greater Shiloh campaign before and after the battle; along with notable figures at Shiloh

    Lt. Col. Barton S. Kyle, 71st Ohio Infantry. He was killed on 6 April 1862 at the Battle of Shiloh while trying to rally his men who were fighting the 19th Alabama Infantry. The 71st Ohio Infantry marker is located at the Field Hospital site on the Federal left flank by the Larkin Bell field.
  48. 1 point
    Before I make any reply to Ozzy's comprehensive post, I just wanted to paste in the ‎Snippet view from a Google search result from Civil War Memories - Page 193 by Linda Zimmermann - 1998. It looks new to me, concerning the Tigress and its passengers on the trip upstream, April 6th. The book's Amazon description states: "An exciting compilation of firsthand accounts of the Civil War from a soldier who was also a journalist." The subtitle is, "The Collected writings of Sgt. William H. Busbey." That individual seems to have been a soldier-correspondent in the 1st Kentucky of Bruce's AotO brigade. (which would have been at or around Savannah that morning). The snippet reads: "Tigress was the only vessel that had steamed up, and comprehending that Grant would go on that vessel, my comrade and myself went down and climbed on in advance of ... "About four miles above Savannah, we came to Crump's Landing." Has anybody read the full account here or elsewhere? Now, I just ran across this: "My great grandfather, William H. Busbey, was a sergeant with Company C of the 1st KY (US) infantry. One of his brothers, Private Hamilton Busbey, also served with him. WH Busbey was a gifted writer. He kept diaries of his experiences (I have them), freelanced for Harpers Weekly during the Civil War and was employed in various journalistic capacities post-war, most notably as an accomplished editor with the Chicago InterOcean, until his death in 1906. A book "Civil War Memories" was published in 1998 which is a compilation of his weekly newspaper columns experiences from the western theater of the war. I am looking to connect with anyone whose ancestors may have served w/ the 1st KY (US)." There may be historical gold in those diaries. 2 linear feet of the Busbey Papers are at the University of Michigan, Duke has 15 items. Personal letters of Busbey concerning politics in Ohio; letters express opinions on Copperheads, other Democrats, Republicans, and the unsuccessful gubernatorial race of Clement Vallandigham against Republican John Brough in 1863. Letters also mention the Freemasons; crime in Ohio; the life of a soldier; and CSA attacks on Union boats near Palmyra, Tennessee, and the burning of that town by the Union troops.
  49. 1 point
    Jimj .just shows youve been up north TOO long.
  50. 1 point
    On #15--"Nothing but hospitals and dead bodies--as long as Sherman pursued"....there was the "pursuit order" so this part of the report "overlooks" the fighting at fallen timbers.on the 8th.
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