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  1. 3 points
    I located Sgt. William H. Busbey's post-war article about his being near Grant's Savannah headquarters and on Tigress during the trip to Pittsburg Landing on April 6th in the Chicago Inter-Ocean. Some obvious errors make it not completely reliable, and it may be completely unreliable, but it does make for interesting reading: "I was at Savannah in April, 1862, associated with the work of the Adams Express company . Myself and another young man employed in the same office were sleeping on the night of April 5 in a house in Savannah three or four blocks from the river. General Grant's headquarters at Savannah were in a house very close to the river. We were on higher ground than he was, and about daylight on the morning of April 6 the young man sleeping with me jumped out of bed with the exclamation, 'There's firing up at the Landing.' We could hear very distinctly the boom of cannon, and when we went to the east window we could hear, or thought we could hear, the sound of musketry. Pittsburg landing was nine miles away, but in the still morning air the roar of musketry came to us." "We dressed hurriedly, ran down to General Grant's headquarters, where we found General Webster, chief of artillery, in his night shirt on the porch listening intently to the sound of firing. We saw him run into the house, and another officer came out with him. They listened a minute, ran in again, and General Grant came out in his night dress. The three figures stood like statues while Grant listened, and then the General gave an order that put everything in a whirl. Ned Osborne of Chicago was at that time in command of Grant's headquarters guard, and under excitement he was a very active man." "In a few minutes staff officers were awake and dressed, the escort was mounted and ready to go, and the General and staff boarded at once the steamer Tigress. I remembered as I looked over the steamers at the landing tht the Tigress was the only vessel that had steam up, and comprehending that Grant would go on that vessel, my comrade and myself went down and climbed on in advance of the General and his staff. There was a ittle wait for the escort and horses of the officers, but when all were on board the steamer did not move. Inquiry developed the fact that neither the captain nor the pilot was awake or had received any notice of the journey. They were stirred up in short order, and soon the Tigress started up the river for Pittsburg Landing." "About four miles above Savannah we came to Crump's landing. General Lew Wallace, in command of the division at that point, was on the steamer Jessie K. Bell. When we came up within fifty yards of the Bell, Grant shouted to Wallace, asking if he had any news from the front. Wallace shouted back saying that a courier had just arrived with the report that Sherman had been attacked by a heavy force. Grant, with great intensity of manner, asked: 'Does the dispatch say a heavy force?' Wallace replied that it did and Grant ordered the captain of the Tigress to make all possible speed for Pittsburg Landing." "As we started General Wallace shouted in surprise: 'General Grant, have you no orders for me?' and Grant, after thinking a moment, shouted back, 'Hold yourself in readiness to march.' Then we steamed away, but in a few minutes Ross came to me and said: 'It is a general attack this time, sure.' I asked him how he knew and he said that Captain Baxter had just received orders from Grant to take a steam tug and carry orders back to General Wallace to move at once and take position on the right of the Union force engaged in battle. We arrived at Pittsburg Landing in a short time and General Grant rode away at once toward the front." [The article went on about Busbey's experiences in the battle, including hauling guns up the bluff for Webster, the boats in the river, and Mother Bickerdyke.]
  2. 2 points
    As we know, after his defeat at Pea Ridge, Arkansas (also known as Elkhorn Tavern) Major General Earl Van Dorn of the Trans-Mississippi was requested to support the forces of General Albert Sidney Johnston in Tennessee… but there was no apparent urgency in the request. Van Dorn arrived at Memphis about 8 April 1862 and stopped at The Gayoso House. Also in Memphis was Mrs. Mary Ann Webster Loughborough, whose husband James, was a Captain on the Staff of Brigadier General Cockrell. Mary Webster of New York married James Loughborough in Kentucky a few years earlier; then the couple moved west and established themselves in St. Louis, Missouri (and subsequently gravitated towards the Rebel cause.) In early April 1862 Mrs. Loughborough wrote the following letter to a friend, revealing the presence of notable Confederates in Memphis: Gayoso House, Memphis, April, 1862. My dear J——: I am just in from dinner; and you would be amused to see the different faces—I might as well say the different appetites; for the Army of Missouri and Arkansas have been undergoing rigorous fasts of late; and the little episode of the battle of Elkhorn and the consequent privations have helped not a little the gaunt appearance of these military characters. All eat, eat rapidly; from General V—— D—— down to the smallest lieutenant, whose manner of playing the epicure over the different dishes ordered, is a study. The confidential consultations with the waiter over them, together with the knowing unconsciousness of bestowing his small change, almost convinces me that he is a brigadier-general, or a colonel, at least. You see streaming in constantly this tide of human beings, to eat, stare at the ladies, talk, and order much wine in the excitement of military anecdotes; for you must understand that a civilian is a “rara avis” amid the brilliant uniforms of the dining room. Yet, amid all this mass and huge crowd, the majority are polished gentlemen, who have evidently seen much of the world, and who are men of purpose and character. General V—— D—— and staff sit not far from me—looked at rather jealously by the Missourians, as ranking and commanding them over their favorite general. Yet, he always treats the old general with the utmost consideration and courtesy. On the other side sits General P——, with his kind, benevolent face. The poor old gentleman finds at the table his lightest reserves become his heaviest forces: nearly all his staff are about him. And, as I sit half amused at the expression of some faces, and thinking deeply of the mute, yet determined impress of character on others, two gentlemen come in—one in plain citizen’s clothing, with heavy black beard and high forehead—with stooping gait and hands behind him. I am told he is Governor J——, of Missouri. His face puzzles me—it is thoughtful and singular. By his side, with tall, lithe, slender figure, fully erect, walks General J—— T——. You will scarcely think it possible that this is the so-frequently talked of J—— T——. I thought him an ordinary man, did not you? Yet, this is anything but an ordinary man. The keen dark eye sweeps the room as he enters, taking us all in at a glance—a quick, daring, decisive, resolute face. I can make nothing more out of him. Yet, there is more of thought and intellect than you see at first. He is dressed in full uniform, with sword and sash, and has quite a military air. There are many Saint Louisians here; you see them scattered around the tables quite plentifully. General C—— is among the number. He sits at some distance, and looks quite worn and sad. You know—do you not?—that he is the father of young Churchill Clark, who was killed at Elkhorn. Have I ever told you his history? It is this: He graduated at West Point in the commencement of the war; and knowing and having a great admiration for General P——, he joined him at once: he was put in command of some artillery; and showing himself a youth of courage and ability—for he was only twenty years old—his command was increased. Throughout the constant trials and sufferings of the campaign, he showed himself equal in courage, daring, and judgment, to many older heads. He was particularly beloved by General P——. At Elkhorn, as ever, his battery sustained itself with coolness and bravery. As the general rode by, he said some cheering words to young Clark, who took off his cap and waved it, saying, “General, we will hold our own,” or words to that effect, when a ball sped from the enemy, and crashed in the young, ardent brain as he spoke. I have been told that the general was affected to tears. He knelt by his side, vainly seeking for some trace of the strong, young life, but the pulses were stilled forever; and Churchill Clark lay a stiffened corpse in the long, wet grass at Elkhorn. And so his father sits silent and alone, and all respect the grief that none can assuage. In a few days we leave. The gentlemen all go to Corinth, where a battle, in all probability, will take place before long. Fort Pillow can hardly hold out, under the daily bombardment that we hear from the gunboats; and if it falls, Memphis, on taking leave of the Confederate officers, will usher in the Federal to quarters in the Gayoso. Adieu.
  3. 2 points
    Thanks for this. Another little piece of Civil War Chicagoiana to add to my collection. Rumsey was late to his own funeral...but for a poignant reason.
  4. 2 points
    Great photo... and of benefit to learn that the significant action in the Plum Orchard has finally been recognized... 🙂
  5. 2 points
    maybe due to the addition of "Plum Orchard Rd"
  6. 2 points
    There are two pieces of communication (one constructed on April 5th, and the other generated on April 6th 1862) both of which are important in their own way to explain “how the Battle of Shiloh unfolded.” And both documents have "issues." The first item is a telegram constructed at St. Louis and sent under signature of Major General Henry Halleck on Saturday 5 April 1862. Fitting Halleck’s style of issuing concise orders, the two-line telegram begins by listing the recently promoted Major Generals by order of seniority: Buell, Pope, McClernand, C.F. Smith, Wallace. The inclusion of John Pope is significant because Major General Pope would soon join the Advance on Corinth. And the place held by John McClernand (ahead of Charles Ferguson Smith) may have come as a surprise to Major General Ulysses S. Grant… but no matter, as the late formal notice of MGen McClernand’s seniority did not provide opportunity to ‘Provide him with benefits of seniority to which he was entitled” i.e., the Shell Game played by Generals Grant, Smith, Sherman and Captain McMichael had worked perfectly; and now, at this late hour, McClernand would be notified in due course of his official seniority (likely after U.S. Grant established his HQ at Pittsburg Landing… When McClernand operating as “acting commander” had odds somewhere between Slim and None.) The second line of Halleck’s telegram reads: “You will act in concert [with General Buell] but he will exercise his separate command, unless the enemy should attack you. In that case you are authorized to take the general command.” The wording of this second line, giving Grant emergency authority over Buell in case of attack by Rebels, has significant implications. And yet, when the conduct of Day Two at Shiloh is closely examined, there is nothing more significant in regard to General Grant exercising command, than, “You take the left; and I’ll take the right” during the advance of Monday morning (coordination at its most minimal.) Which leads one to ponder: When did General Grant receive this telegram from Henry Halleck? If it was sent by telegraph from St. Louis late morning of April 5th, it likely arrived at the Fort Henry telegraph office before noon. If a steamer picked up the mail and telegraph traffic at 1 p.m., (perhaps the Minnehaha) then the 5 April telegram would arrive about midnight… plenty of time for Grant to read and understand the contents. But, at 2 p.m. on Sunday, April 6th, where was this telegram from Halleck? The cool indifference shared between Grant and Buell (with Buell simply left at the waterfront, while Grant headed away west to take care of business) does not represent “someone in possession of an important telegram, giving them extraordinary authority.” Instead, it seems to indicate General Grant has not yet received the telegram; or he has seen it… but left it behind at the Cherry Mansion. The second communication was constructed on Sunday morning by Captain A.S. Baxter, the AQM for Grant’s Army, as he rode the steamer Tigress north to relay Grant’s orders (likely relayed from Grant, through Captain John Rawlins, to Baxter.) Finding the orders complex and difficult to remember in detail, Captain Algernon Baxter scanned the floor of the Ladies’ Cabin, found a soiled bit of paper, and wrote the orders (as he best remembered them) onto that scrap (later recorded as “containing a heel mark and tobacco stain.”) Upon arrival at Crump’s Landing, Captain Baxter found Lieutenant Ross – Aide to Major General Wallace – waiting. The two rode away west and reported to MGen Wallace at, or just before 11:30 a.m. Captain Baxter presented General Wallace with the impromptu order; Wallace asked why it was not signed. Baxter explained he “created the memorandum, himself, out of fear he would “forget some detail” unless he did so.” General Wallace passed the “written order” to his Staff, and asked Baxter about the current state of affairs [Baxter left Pittsburg Landing between 10 and 10:30.] Captain Baxter replied, “We are driving them.” General Wallace was satisfied; Wallace’s staff officers were satisfied. The order was accepted, and Captain Baxter took his departure within three minutes of arrival at Stony Lonesome. Captain Frederick Kneffler, Lew Wallace’s AAG, wound up with the “written order.” He tucked it under his sword belt… and subsequently lost it. Ever since, the loss of that written order, or memorandum, has been significant because it would provide tangible proof of what Major General Wallace had been ordered to do. And, it is not difficult to envision the memorandum, jiggling loose from Captain Kneffler’s sword belt, and blowing away… to be beaten by heavy rain that night; ultimately washed into the Snake River, then Tennessee River… lost forever. But, paper was in short supply, always. Letters by soldiers were often written making use of every millimetre of space, including margins and borders. As likely as the memorandum being lost forever, it was just as likely noticed, clinging to trampled stubble, by some soldier… one of thousands following behind Kneffler on his horse. This soldier would have snatched it up, and possibly sent it as souvenir with his own letter, a few days later. My point: there is every chance that the Lew Wallace memorandum from Baxter still exists, contained in a box of Civil War letters and paraphernalia, and the owners have no idea what they have in their possession. But, with all the other material being revealed on a weekly basis, one day this piece of history might just surprise everyone, and re-emerge.
  7. 2 points
    [Part three of Corinth, interrupted] Grant’s operation, with HQ at Savannah was kept on the back burner: just active enough to keep Rebel commanders guessing, but not sufficiently robust to allow General Grant to take the reins pre-emptively. The first benefit to Grant from success further west was assignment of Benjamin Prentiss to command of the newly created Sixth Division (although Halleck tasked Brigadier General Prentiss with other duties enroute, delaying his ultimate arrival at Pittsburg Landing.) In addition, Grant was aware that Don Carlos Buell was marching south and west to effect a join at Savannah (but Grant was frustrated by the slow pace of the Army of the Ohio.) Still, these troop additions were approved by Halleck, and were part of the overall plan to initiate the Operation against Corinth, in the proper sequence… after Victory at Island No.10 (when another source of manpower (Pope), as well as ammunition and abundant supplies would be made available.) References: SDG topics “Just supposin’ begun 26 FEB 2018 and “Full Hospitals” begun 30 JAN 2018 for Prentiss tasks enroute to Savannah Tennessee. SDG topic “Grant’s six divisions” begun 1 DEC 2018 details growth of Pittsburg force. OR 8 pages 633 – 4 telegram (23 MAR 1862) in which Henry Halleck lays out his “Programme” for SecWar Stanton, which includes, “Pope’s progress is necessarily slow,” and, “I have directed General Grant to make no move until Buell’s column (now at Columbia) can form junction with him.” Also, Halleck asserts, “We must take Corinth in order to seriously injure Rebel communications.” [And Halleck proposes possible moves for T.W. Sherman (the other Sherman) and Benjamin Butler which “might take advantage of [Bragg’s Army] leaving Florida and Alabama.”] OR 8 page 631 communication of 21 MAR 1862 from MGen Halleck to F/O Foote: “Everything is progressing well on the Tennessee River towards opening your way down the Mississippi.” [Illustrates the “connected” nature of Halleck’s operations, and alludes to the “proper sequence” of those operations.] OR 8 page 643 telegram from Army AG Thomas to MGen Halleck of 25 MAR 1862: “BGen Thomas Davies has been assigned duty in Department of the Mississippi.” [In preparation for conduct of operations after success at Island No.10 Halleck has called for more trained general officers to assist, as part of Halleck’s program. General Thomas Davies will be assigned command of Second Division, following deaths of WHL Wallace… and C.F. Smith.] OR 8 page 649 telegram SecWar Stanton to MGen Halleck of 29 MAR 1862: “You will report without delay the strength and distribution of your command.” [Halleck’s response 30 March: “Buell 101,000 in KY and Tenn; Grant 75,000 in Tennessee; Pope 25000 at New Madrid; Curtis 23000 in Arkansas; Strong 9000 District of Cairo; Steele 6000 in Arkansas; Schofield 15000 District of St. Louis (including new regiments at Benton Barracks); Totten 4000 in Central Missouri; Loan 2000 in Northern Missouri; about 10000 men in Kansas, Nebraska and Colorado.”] And follows telegram of Halleck to Stanton of 28 MAR 1862 revealing “elevated level of sickness experienced by men on Tennessee River expedition” (and lays blame on brigade and regimental surgeons of volunteers.) One-in-three reported sick, and is of concern because Halleck intends to make use of Grant’s Army… soon. OR 8 page 660 communication MGen Halleck to F/O Andrew Foote of 5 APR 1862: “I shall want a gunboat at Cairo ready to go up the Tennessee River in the early part of next week.” [With the successful run of USS Carondelet past the guns of Island No.10 on April 4th, Halleck knows it is “a matter of days” before Pope crosses his army and forces the trapped Rebels to surrender (in rear of Island No.10).] OR 8 page 661 communication Halleck to MGen Samuel Curtis (Army of the Southwest) on April 5th 1862: “Price and Van Dorn will soon leave your front [and the great battle of the war is to be fought on the Tennessee River.]” OR 8 page 672 telegram Halleck to Stanton of 7 APR 1862: “Buell’s advance force has reached Grant; entire force will connect in two or three days” [sent before news arrived at St. Louis IRT Battle of Shiloh initiated early 6 APR 1862.] OR 8 page 676 communication of 8 APR 1862 from Assistant Secretary of War Thomas Scott to Henry Halleck, alluding to “sequence of events” after Surrender of Island No.10.
  8. 2 points
    and found in the area of this high ground were numerous springs...good water..army is fueled by coffee. unlike what was to be had in Corinth later...
  9. 2 points
    Then again, I don't know how much that time mattered. The Confederates were disorganized, thus part of the reason they stopped. Had they continued on the attack, being so disorganized, I venture that the disorganization would have caused even more ill coordinated attacks, and potentially, disaster for the Confederates, if that makes sense.
  10. 1 point
    In further consideration of Bohemians... Always happy to admit when I am wrong (well, maybe not happy, but I admit my mistakes, anyway.) In the case of Bohemians, and the use of the term in relation to the Intelligentsia who frequented Pfaff's Cave, I stumbled upon an early use of "Bohemian" while searching for information about the Wide Awake Movement. In the Chicago Press & Tribune of 6 APR 1860 on page 2 col.5 is a comprehensive description of Pfaff's Cave, and the patrons of that place... a full year before Civil War erupted: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82014511/1860-04-06/ed-1/seq-2/#date1=1860&sort=date&rows=20&words=Awakes&searchType=basic&sequence=0&index=12&state=Illinois&date2=1860&proxtext=Awakes&y=18&x=13&dateFilterType=yearRange&page=2 Amazing what can be found, when you're not looking Ozzy
  11. 1 point
    In The Life of Albert Sidney Johnston, page 525, it is recorded: 'After the Battle of Pea Ridge, General Van Dorn was ordered to Corinth.' Bentonville, Arkansas is about 300 miles from Helena (on the Mississippi River), and the battle concluded on March 8, 1862. Calculating an easy pace of fifteen miles per day, Van Dorn's force could have reached Helena by March 28... taken steamers to Memphis, arriving by March 31st... then train ride on the Memphis & Charleston, arriving at Corinth April 2-4. So, why didn't they? Apparently, much of the 'Van Dorn was ordered to Corinth' (the claim appears in Beauregard's Military Biography, page 346, too)... is a sham. But, let's start at the beginning: the first letter sent to General Earl Van Dorn, requesting he 'join his force with General Beauregard's on the Mississippi River, if possible,' was sent via Governor Isham Harris on March 7, 1862 (while the Battle of Pea Ridge was underway.) [OR Serial 8, page 771] Van Dorn replied on March 16: 'Your letter did not reach me until just a few days ago, on my return from the battlefield. I will start in a day or two for Pocahontas, Arkansas.' (OR Serial 8, page 784) [No obvious sense of urgency, because no haste was requested -- Ozzy.] On March 25, Albert Sidney Johnston reported to President Davis: 'Van Dorn has offered to send his force north to assist in the defense of Island No. 10, but I ordered him to Memphis.' [OR Serial 11, page 361] Meanwhile, Van Dorn directed his Army of the West to assemble at Pocahontas... then Jacksonport... then Des Arc, Arkansas (a port on the White River.) By early April, the gathering of Van Dorn's force was underway; Earl Van Dorn issued 'Special Orders No. 41' on April 7, directing that Sterling Price's Division commence the steamboat ride to Memphis on the morning of April 8 (and Van Dorn made the trip to Memphis, himself, and arrived about April 8... in time to receive the first message that expressed any urgency: 'General Beauregard requests that you hurry forward your command.' [OR Serial 11, page 398: message from Captain John Adams, post of Memphis, dated April 8, 1862.] On April 9, General Beauregard telegraphed to General Cooper at Richmond: 'Van Dorn may join us in Corinth in a few days with 15.000 more troops.' [OR Serial 11, page 403] On April 12, Sterling Price told Van Dorn: 'I have sent Colonel Little's Brigade to Corinth, and General Rust's command to Fort Pillow, by order of General Beauregard.' [OR Serial 11, page 414] [What this indicates to me, is the effort to defend the Mississippi River was as important to General Beauregard as the assembly of Rebels at Corinth. And the 'slow movement' of Van Dorn east allowed an opportunity to re-direct Van Dorn north... but the opportunity for Van Dorn to join the build-up at Corinth in a timely manner (before the Battle of Shiloh) was lost -- Ozzy.] In effect, Van Dorn had no opportunity to join the Army of the Mississippi, prior to the Battle of Shiloh: he was not tardy; he was never told to hurry, until it was too late. Ozzy References: Life of Albert Sidney Johnston, by Preston Johnston The Military Operations of General Beauregard, by Alfred Roman OR Serials 8 and 11
  12. 1 point
    Mona Excellent question... because the above letters, detailing the movement of Van Dorn and Price from Arkansas (ultimately for service at Corinth) are to be found in Appendix at back of My Cave Life in Vicksburg, which was published in New York City in 1864. With the Civil War still in progress, I suspect that author Mary Ann Loughborough attempted to "shield" people and places from unnecessary scrutiny. For me, it was a surprise to find details of Price and Van Dorn in Memphis... in a book about Vicksburg. http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/35700?msg=welcome_stranger My Cave Life in Vicksburg [at Project Gutenberg] Cheers Ozzy
  13. 1 point
    wonder why names were dashed out...
  14. 1 point
    Another witness to the Story of Grant and Prentiss was Orville Hickman Browning, career politician and lawyer from Illinois, involved in the State Legislature, and a lifelong friend of Abraham Lincoln (beginning with their shared experience during the Black Hawk War of 1831.) And, Mr. Browning kept a diary (some entries): 14 APR 1861 (Sunday, at Quincy Illinois) Learned that Fort Sumter had been captured by the traitors. 15 APR Received conflicting stories of the events at Fort Sumter. 22 APR Took the train to Springfield, and reached that place just after midnight. Found cars on the track filled with soldiers, under command of Colonel Benjamin Prentiss, about to start for Cairo. A scheme had been set on foot, by which traitors in Southern Illinois (the area was called Egypt) would act in confederacy with other traitors in Missouri and Tennessee to seize Cairo, cut off all of the State south of the Ohio & Mississippi R.R. and [establish a new State and join it to the confederacy.] To prevent the execution of so diabolical a plot, it was deemed advisable to anticipate them in the occupation of Cairo, and it is now in possession of 1200 of our troops, under command of Col. Ben Prentiss. [State militia Brigadier General Richard Kellogg Swift, under orders issued 21 APR 1861 by Governor Yates, rushed a force of 500 men and artillery south and took possession of Cairo. He then turned over command of Cairo to Colonel B. M. Prentiss, and BGen R. K. Swift returned to Chicago.] 23 APR (at Springfield) Visited Camp Yates in company with Marshall and Oglesby. 24 APR (Wednesday at Springfield) busied himself with affairs at the State House. And on 25 April 1861 a Special Military Bill (giving Governor Yates extraordinary powers during the current crisis) was debated. While the debate continued, Judge [Stephen A. Douglas] arrived and met with me; and we acted in concert to smooth out the Military Bill [which was passed into Law.] That night (25 APR) Judge Douglass made a speech in the Hall of the House declaring himself ready to stand by the Government to the uttermost extremity in putting down treason. 7 June Meeting of the bar this morning in Federal Court Room, Springfield, in regard to Judge Stephen A. Douglass' death (on 3 June 1861). [Orville Browning will subsequently be selected to fill the vacancy as Senator from Illinois, with effect from 26 June 1861.] 2 July Orville Browning, appointed as Senator from Illinois, arrived Washington, D.C. to participate in the Summer session of Congress. 6 July Met with President Lincoln at the White House. 11 July Met General John C. Fremont in Nicolay's room (Fremont had just returned from Europe, where he had undertaken major contracts purchasing arms and ammunition on behalf of the United States Government. Fremont had been in Europe since April.) 19 July Went to the White House to meet with the President. Found a number of others already there, discussing war matters. 21 July (Sunday) A great fight is going on today at Manassas Junction... At supper we received news that we had "forced the enemy back." 22 July News everywhere of the disasters at Bull Run yesterday... 25 July Discussion centers on Appointments of Generals for the War. Senator Browning intercedes on Benjamin Prentiss' behalf. 27 July Pope and Hurlbut already being appointed Brigadier Generals, we thought we would be entitled to seven more. I was for Prentiss, McClernand, Payne, Richardson, Palmer, Grant and Stokes. 28 July Entire Sunday spent in deliberations on proposed Brigadier Generals. The Democrats withheld votes from Prentiss and Palmer in order to give preference to Grant and McClernand. 29 July Met with President Lincoln and explained how the selection of Brigadier Generals had been carried out. President Lincoln told me he would only appoint three [from the list] at present: Prentiss, McClernand and Payne. 9 AUG Got order from the Department to Governor Yates for General McClernand. And went to Surgeon General to see about Hospital for Quincy [and Senator Browning departed later that day for home in Illinois, arriving 10 pm on August 15th.] 21 AUG Senator Browning took it upon himself to go to St. Louis and "see General Fremont about making a military post of Quincy." 26 AUG Following a constructive, but non-committal discussion with General Fremont, Senator Browning returned to Quincy. 3 SEP After learning of serious attacks on the Hannibal & St. Joseph R.R., Senator Browning decides to return to St. Louis to discuss current affairs with General Fremont in person. Travels by rail via Springfield, then to Mississippi River across from St. Louis. By September 5th Senator Browning is in St. Louis. 6 SEP General Prentiss arrived here (last night) on account of his difficulty with General Grant. At 1 pm I went with Prentiss, Governor Wood, Sam Holmes and Boyle to see General Fremont. Prentiss' difficulty was satisfactorily adjusted. Fremont does not censure him, but will reinstate him in Command... [And on this very day, Brigadier General Ulysses S. Grant is taking possession of Paducah...] For those wanting to read more: https://archive.org/details/diaryoforvillehi20brow/page/498 Diary of Orville Browning.
  15. 1 point
    Since the April 1862 Letter from Mrs. Loughborough seems to have sparked some interest, here is another one, written a few days later by the same author: Memphis, April. Dear J——: Again I write you from the Gayoso House, which still teems with Missourians, and many ladies—some few from St. Louis. General P——’s parlor is filled with ladies from morning until night. I have been told that on one occasion some ladies, who were the reverse of beautiful, were coming in to see him, when he turned to one of his staff officers, and told him that it was his duty to assist him—that here was an opportunity: he must kiss these ladies for him; but the officer was politely deaf until too late. It is astonishing to see how ladies do flock to see the old general; and all kiss him, as a matter of course. I rode out to the camp of the Missourians with M——, a few mornings since. It is pleasantly situated near the bank of the river. The men seem to be in good spirits; although moving them across the Mississippi has been an unpopular act. The poor fellows are being taken out to Corinth as fast as transportation can be furnished them. The compliment is paid them of being placed in the most dangerous position; for we daily expect an attack from the Federal forces on Corinth. Would you like to see those you love complimented in this way? You can form no idea of the love and devotion shown by the Missouri troops for their general. I happened to be standing near a window at the end of the hall, last evening, as some regiments passed by the Gayoso on their way out to the depot, bound for Corinth. General P—— stood out on the veranda as they passed by, and shouts and cheers for the old general and Missouri rent the air. General J—— T—— called on me this morning, and amused me much with some of his adventures in Missouri last winter; among others, he told us of his dash into the little town of Commerce for food. His men were ordered to take a certain amount, lay down the money, and leave. As he sat on a small horse, waiting for them, out came the “heroine of Commerce,” as he called the lady. I have forgotten her name; yet, I think it was O’Sullivan. She walked up to the general, shook her clenched hand in his face, and told him he was a robber and a scoundrel. Her husband pulled her by the arm and tried to make her desist; but she was deaf to his entreaties, standing part of the time on one side of the little horse, and part of the time on the other; first, shaking her clenched hand at him, and then standing, with arms folded, calling him all manner of names. Some of the officers wished General T—— to have her confined to her own house until his departure; but he laughed, and said: “No; let her alone.” She still continued hovering around him, threatening and talking. He said: “Oh! Mrs. O’Sullivan, you are a modest woman—a very modest woman. Madam, don’t you think your house stands in need of you?” Powerless fell the irony: wherever he went, he was followed by the persistent Mrs. O’Sullivan; stop where he would, Mrs. O’Sullivan was by his side, much to the amusement of his followers; go where he would, up rose Mrs. O’Sullivan unexpectedly at corners—red-faced and bitter—always in the same belligerent, defiant state. A steamboat was seen coming down the river. General T—— ordered his men to hide behind a woodpile until it came up, expecting to get supplies from it. When they thought themselves disposed out of sight, General T—— raised his eyes, and behold! some little distance up the river, stood the inevitable Mrs. O’Sullivan, violently gesticulating to the boat, and crying, “Turn, turn! J—— T—— is here;” at the same time waving her apron and sun bonnet, in quite a frantic manner. The boat turned indeed; and although the scheme failed, behind the woodpile sat General T——, chagrined at the failure, yet laughing most heartily at the attitude and mal-à-propos appearance of Mrs. O’Sullivan. The hotel is crowded with military men: many wounded at the late battle of Shiloh, going around with arms in slings; others supported by crutches. The ladies are seemingly having a very gay time: the halls are filled with promenaders, and the parlors with gay young couples, music, and laughter. Yet, a sudden surprise has come to all: New Orleans has fallen—an unexpected blow to most of the Southern officers. I cannot but think, as I see all the life and bustle around me, of the different scenes a week or two hence, when the fearful battle of Corinth will have taken place. How many that are now happy and full of life, looking forward with confidence to the laurels that may be won, before the struggle is over will be silent forever in death! or, worse, perhaps lamed and maimed for life! General Beauregard’s works are said to be fine; yet, the Federal approaches are said to be greatly superior. My husband goes to-morrow to Corinth; and I will go to O——, Miss., to await the result of what all seem to think will be a most bloody struggle. I will write on reaching O——; until then, farewell.
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  17. 1 point
    Rbn3 Thanks for adding "The Rest of the Story." There are a number of reasons why I. P. Rumsey's experiences (never fully revealed) are fascinating: he assisted with writing of "Life and Letters of General WHL Wallace" someone had to ride the steamer north, down the Tennessee River to alert General Grant (and the identity of that Officer has never been verified) I. P. Rumsey kept a diary (which is rumored to be released to the public... soon.) All the best Ozzy N.B. How is The Story of Patrick Gregg progressing?
  18. 1 point
    While trying to decide whether to watch a movie or go to bed the other night, I switched on the TV and scanned what was on offer: Jane got a Gun was advertised as "a Western, set after the Civil War" and it starred Natalie Portman, Joel Edgerton and Ewan McGregor. Since I'd never seen it (never heard of it) I figured I would give it a go... After ten or fifteen minutes, I decided this story (about a bounty hunter in New Mexico who is hired by his former fiance (before he enlisted in the Union Army)... Now, she is married to someone else; and she wants her former fiance to avenge the shooting of the man she married... This movie was not for me. As I took control of the remote, the two characters played by McGregor and Edgerton (John Bishop and Dan Frost) commenced a conversation: John: "You see this revolver? It's one of my prized possessions... got it from General Beauregard for helping him at Shiloh." Dan just glances at the displayed weapon without making remark. John: "You know, it's funny," continues John. "They told us later that Shiloh meant, "Place of Peace.'" Dan, shaking his head: "Warn't nothin' peaceful about Shiloh..." I put down the remote; decided to give this movie another few minutes... But although there were more Civil War references, there was nothing more about Shiloh. Still... although I rate this as "half-a-star" (out of five -- one of the worst films ever made) it stands as "The most recent feature film to contain some reference to Shiloh." https://www.imdb.com/title/tt2140037/?ref_=tt_ch "Jane got a Gun" (2015) entry at imdb. Ozzy
  19. 1 point
    Oh, that was so helpful to me. My gggrandther was McKoins. You are wonderful Ozzy, thank you so much. Nice to meet you both
  20. 1 point
    Hello, I am a long time amateur CW historian but have a newfound interest in Shiloh due to my ancestral link. As a result of some active family genealogy I discovered I have ancestors who fought on both sides of the battle. My 3rd great grandfather CC Harris was a 1SGT with the 12th Tennessee, Russell's Brigade, Clark's Division, Polk's Corps. And his future daughter's uncle-in-law, David H Marshall, was there on the Union side with the 13th Kentucky Infantry, Boyle's Brigade, 5th Division, Army of the Ohio. As a result of this my interest in Shiloh has been reinvigorated. I'll be following this board closely. Any information on these units or direction to primary source material will be most welcome. The image attached is GGG Gpa CC Harris. If anyone can provide info on this uniform I'd be thankful. Thanks for the hospitality, -Brian
  21. 1 point
    This is great to know.thanks!!
  22. 1 point
    Sometimes you find details where you least expect them... and this autobiography is a real gem: Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife by Mary Logan https://archive.org/details/reminiscencesas02logagoog/page/n8 The view from Cairo of "what was taking place, just across the Ohio River" (...and I was going to just list the "important bits" relevant to us at Shiloh Discussion Group): pp. 100 - 116 Muster and drill in Southern Illinois (31st Illinois Infantry, Colonel Logan -- Member of Congress) pp. 116 - 118 Battle of Belmont (as experienced by those waiting for the Troop Transports to return) page 120 The 31st Illinois meets General Grant pp. 121 - 122 Fort Henry pp. 122 - 126 Fort Donelson (where Colonel Logan is wounded. His wife, Mary, describes her efforts to retrieve him from the battlefield.) pp. 127 - 129 The move up the Tennessee River to Pittsburg Landing (reflects a civilian's understanding of what took place) page 129 Major General Halleck in command. page 130 General Halleck is called to Washington (and General Grant resumes command...) But, the most important bits are "what came afterwards..." pp. 130 - 131 The relationship of Generals James B. McPherson and John Logan pp. 159 - 161 The replacement of Army of the Tennessee Commander John Logan with O. O. Howard pp. 162 - 168 Incredible exchange of letters after the war between William T. Sherman and John Logan, reflecting on "interpersonal relationships" involving Sherman, Logan, O. O. Howard, George H. Thomas and Ulysses S. Grant. pp. 170 - 172 Another illuminating exchange between Grenville Dodge and John Logan (regarding Dodge, Logan, WT Sherman and George Thomas). If you want to understand "why Union commanders related to each other the way they did," and "why friction seemed to appear from nowhere" (and how those interpersonal relationships impacted actual "fighting of the War"), then this is a good place to start... "Harmony" Ozzy
  23. 1 point
    The General's Wife: the Life of Mrs. Ulysses S. Grant, published 1959 by Ishbel Ross; Dodd, Meade & Co., New York is another collection of letters and memories, centered on Julia Dent Grant (as she observed the enormity of History taking place around her -- and had her own "brushes with fate and notoriety.") This work is valuable, to compare with other references, and extend general knowledge of General Grant and his wife. Available online: https://archive.org/details/generalswifethel010870mbp/page/n5
  24. 1 point
    Another day, another master’s thesis… and this one, submitted by William J. McCaffrey in 1970 is revealing, compelling, shocking. Although 140 pages long, this work grips the student of Battle of Shiloh by the throat, and does not let go. It examines “whether or not there was surprise at Pittsburg Landing on April 6th 1862”…and just who was surprised. On page three, a list of six items is posted: flawed conditions of readiness, at least one of which must be present to allow a Defender to get surprised by an Attacker. William McCaffrey devotes the remainder of his thesis to providing evidence of the presence of many of those six conditions of “un-readiness” at Pittsburg Landing in the days, hours and minutes leading up to General Albert Sidney Johnston’s attack. This report contains maps, an excellent list of references, and is constructed by a man concerned about “the lessons of History, and how to avoid the mistakes of History.” Have a read, and decide for yourself how close William McCaffrey, West Point Class of 1958, comes to the mark. Masters Thesis by William J. McCaffrey (1970) “Shiloh: a case study in Surprise” submitted to U.S. Army Command and General Staff College at Fort Leavenworth, KS and on file with National Technical Information Service: https://apps.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/733391.pdf
  25. 1 point
    We took a day trip over to Shiloh on Saturday to enjoy the beautiful weather and walk around for the day, also because it's pretty much been forever since we've stopped by the park. As is customary on every visit, we have our dog, Beauregard, pose for a picture next to his namesake road over by Fraley Field. Not sure why they replaced the old Beauregard sign, even the Visitors Center couldn't really give us an explanation as to why it happened, which is fine, it was simply curiosity if anything.
  26. 1 point
    Ever since its stunning success, there has been debate: Who was responsible for concocting the scheme to move the Union Army up the Tennessee River? General U.S. Grant said it was "his idea, initially labelled as 'ridiculous' when presented to Henry Halleck in early January 1862." In his Memoirs, page 220, William Tecumseh Sherman claims: "I was with Henry Halleck when he came up with the idea to advance up the Tennessee River." But, what if they both are wrong; what if the real developer and promoter of the move up the Tennessee River, bypassing and turning Fort Columbus... was Anna Ella Carroll ? Have a read of the attached book, A Military Genius: the Life of Anna Ella Carroll, (especially Chapter 4 -- Goes to St. Louis: inception of the plan of the Tennessee Campaign) and tell me what you think: http://www.gutenberg.org/files/21909/21909-h/21909-h.htm#page031 Cheers Ozzy
  27. 1 point
    in case some have not seen the Shiloh NPS site..yet...on Anniversary Sat..the have planned period baseball games..field yet to be determined.There is a organization in Tennessee that has several teams that play ball as was done back in the 1800's. This should be interesting! Just hope we have baseball weather this year.
  28. 1 point
    Camp Near Columbia April 3, 1862 MAJOR-GENERAL HALLECK: Dispatch of yesterday received. The troops at Camp Chase are only fragments, and scarecely more than enough to guard prisoners. I am taking along the division which I designed to have provisionally in front of Columbia. I am not altogether satisfied to do it, but have diminished the force nearer Nashville to remedy it. D. C. BUELL Camp Seven Miles South of Columbia April 3, 1862 9 p.m. MAJOR-GENERAL HALLECK: My troops all on the march. I move ahead to join the leading division, now 40 miles from Columbia. General Sturgis is in Nashville. I have telegraphed him to report to you in Saint Louis. If General Stanley is sent to me I shall be pleased to have him. D. C. BUELL Major-General Headquarters District of the Ohio Nashville, Tenn., April 3, 1862 SPECIAL ORDERS, NO. 5. V. Unless it conflicts with special instructions he may have received or may hereafter receive from the Postmaster-General, Col. A. H. Markland, special agent Post-Office Department, will continue with and take general supervision of the mails for the Army of the Ohio until further orders. By command of Major-General Buell (OLIVER D. GREENE) Assistant Adjutant-General Headquarters District of West Tennessee Savannah, April 3, 1862 GENERAL WILLIAM NELSON, Commanding Fourth Division, Buell's Army: Your advance has arrived here. All difficulties in our neighborhood will be remedied before your arrival. U. S. GRANT Major-General, Commanding Headquarters Sherman's Division Camp Shiloh, April 3, 1862 CAPT. JOHN A. RAWLINS, Assistant Adjutant-General, Steamboat Tigress: SIR: I inclose herewith report of Colonel Taylor of his scout last night, and send, in charge of a guard, with one of my aides, Captain Taylor, the two prisoners--one prisoner of the First Alabama Cavalry, and the other a citizen, Dr. Parkes. Colonel Taylor is a most intelligent officer, and is fully impressed with General Grant's views relative to the unjust arrest of citizens. My orders to him were to molest no citizen, farmer, or mechanic whom he found at home or engaged in his usual legitimate pursuits. But this Dr. Parkes he found at a farmhouse on his way out, and afterward found him beyond, with attending circumstances to show he had given the other pickets warning whom I expected near Greer's. My plan was to post in ambush Colonel Smith's regiment of Zouaves at Greer's on Lick Creek. They started at 8 o'clock p.m. last night, with two excellent guides. The cavalry of Colonel Taylor was to take the Corinth road and turn toward Greer's. He executed his orders, capturing one of the enemy's pickets, whom I send forthwith for General Grant to question, as he is pretty intelligent. The Dr. Parkes I also advise should be held prisoner for having given important information to the enemy. I have yet no reports from Colonel Smith, and expect him back momentarily, when I will communicate the result of his scout. I have the honor to be, your obedient servant, W. T. SHERMAN Brigadier-General, Commanding Division Headquarters Division Camp Shiloh, April 3, 1862 COLONEL BUCKLAND, Commanding Fourth Brigade: SIR: You may march your entire brigade to-day forward on the Corinth road about 3 miles, by way of drill and instruction. When you reach the hill, send companies as skirmishers to the right and left a mile or so. Do not molest people quietly at their usual occupation as farmers, mechanics, but all persons armed, uniformed, or suspicious bring in as prisoners. Keep your men together, unless detached as companies, and allow no firing unless you encounter an enemy. I am, &c., your obedient servant, W. T. SHERMAN Brigadier-General, Commanding Division
  29. 1 point
    Sometimes "interesting information" hides in plain sight... When Manassas Belle posted the above information a few years ago, one particular and curious telegram escaped notice: the 3 APR 1862 telegram (9 p.m.) of Don Carlos Buell to Major General Henry Halleck, sent from the telegraph line that General Buell was stringing from Nashville while he marched the Army of the Ohio towards Savannah. The concerning bit of information is reference to Brigadier General Samuel D. Sturgis (who had spent his Civil War in Missouri, involved at Battle of Wilson's Creek (and given credit for safely withdrawing Union forces north after the death of General Lyon) and also involved in the failed relief of Lexington (which resulted in capture of Colonel Everett Peabody and the 13th Missouri Infantry.) In December of 1861, MGen Halleck (who replaced Fremont in November) sent Sturgis on a "Tour of Inspection, focusing on Federal Army posts along the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers" [according to S.D. Sturgis, USMA Class of 1846 entry on Cullum's Register.] And on March 5th 1862 General Sturgis found himself at Nashville (where he remained, "attached" to Buell's Department of the Ohio up through the time the telegram was sent on April 3rd.) Reading Buell's telegram, three likely scenarios present IRT Brigadier General Sturgis: Buell was dissatisfied with his performance, so left Sturgis behind at Nashville; Buell used the reference to Sturgis as opportunity to press for assignment of Brigadier General David S. Stanley USMA Class of 1852 (then with Pope at New Madrid) to Army of the Ohio, should that officer become available; Sturgis had been sent to Nashville by Henry Halleck, to act as liaison between Buell's Department and Halleck's Department. Why is the role of Samuel Sturgis important? It is known that Civil War telegraph communications were periodically intercepted, and so the most secure communication of sensitive information remained the courier, with that information delivered verbally, and not written down. Next best delivery system: "coded telegrams" (which if intercepted, the enemy could not read.) Given the nature of Halleck's operations (his trust of John Pope, and sharing of confidences with Don Carlos Buell, while NOT trusting Ulysses S. Grant) I believe it likely that General Sturgis operated as go-between, facilitating coded messages to pass between Generals Halleck and Buell, and allowing Major General Grant to be kept "out of the loop." I believe it also likely that "a special code" shared by only Halleck and Buell (delivered by Sturgis to Nashville) allowed passage of coded messages through Cairo, without fear of interception by friends of Grant or Sherman. As of the time of writing, the above is purely speculation. In any event, Brigadier General Sturgis departed Nashville on 10 April 1862. Reference: http://penelope.uchicago.edu/Thayer/E/Gazetteer/Places/America/United_States/Army/USMA/Cullums_Register/1303*.html
  30. 1 point
    From the Union standpoint, the Battle of Shiloh was not supposed to happen. Federal troops were sent south, under command of Brigadier General C.F. Smith, with intention of cutting rail lines and disrupting Rebel communications (between Fort Columbus and Corinth; and between Florence and Corinth.) Abundant Spring rain and effective Rebel defences (and M & O R.R. repair crews) curtailed railroad track disruption. Although an initial base of operations was sited at Union-friendly Savannah, Tennessee, the intention was to establish the Federal base much further south (between Hamburg and Florence) but the grossly swollen Tennessee River turned those prospective campgrounds into sodden, mosquito-infested marshes; and Pittsburg Landing was selected, by default (selected by Brigadier General William T. Sherman, and approved by General Smith.) The high plateau stretching west of the towering bluff overlooking – and out of reach of – the Tennessee River being the primary feature favouring selection of the site. It is said, “There is nothing more permanent than a temporary solution.” Major General U.S. Grant arrived at Savannah on March 17th 1862 and inspected the de facto campgrounds at Crump’s and Pittsburg established by his predecessor, and pronounced them sound. [Part two] With so many operations on his plate, Major General Henry Halleck did not have manpower or war materials in sufficient quantity to permit combat operations to take place concurrently. Priorities had to be determined from among operations taking place in Northern Missouri (Prentiss), SW Missouri (Curtis), SE Missouri (Pope), Island No.10 (Foote) and Savannah/ Pittsburg (Smith, replaced by Grant.) With North Missouri deemed “under control,” followed by Battle of Pea Ridge securing southern Missouri, manpower and ammunition was freed to be sent elsewhere. (Additional manpower was of no use at Island No.10 so those extra regiments went to General Grant, instead.) And with Henry Halleck’s elevation to Commander, Department of the Mississippi, another source of manpower eventuated: Buell’s Army of the Ohio, based in vicinity of Nashville. But, before U.S. Grant’s operation (with passage of time, confirmed to focus on Corinth) would be permitted to commence, the joint operation (Pope, at New Madrid and Foote, approaching Island No.10 from the north) would be given every opportunity to reach a successful conclusion. And General Grant was ordered, “Do nothing to bring on a general engagement.” References: SDG “Do you know Bragg?” post of 18 May 2018: Confederate Daniel Ruggles assigned to Post of Corinth on 9 March 1862 and begins construction of defences soon after. SDG “Jackson HQ” post of 5 May 2017: General Albert Sidney Johnston arrived at Corinth on March 24th, with concentration of Confederate troops (to this time strewn along the M & C R.R. and the M & O R.R.) gaining pace, and most everyone moves to Corinth. OR 10 (part 2) pages 11 – 12: Henry Halleck has information on March 6th that, “Beauregard has 20,000 men at Corinth.” Sherman reports similar concentration at “Eastport and Corinth” that same day. SDG “Not just pictures…” post of 5 July 2017: Report of Agate (Whitelaw Reid) dateline Savannah Tennessee on 1 April 1862, “There are rumors that General Halleck will take the field here, in person, soon as the Island No.10 agony is over. And there will be four or five corps [marching to Corinth] commanded by Major Generals Grant, Smith, Wallace, Buell and McClernand.”
  31. 1 point
    Mona Your point is correct IRT ample fresh water available at Pittsburg Landing. In addition, water provided "defense," of sorts: swollen Snake Creek and Lick Creek provided impassable barriers, early on... natural moats. And Lew Wallace was likely maintained at Crump's Landing, both to keep him removed from interference with Brigadier General Sherman (as you have previously suggested), and to continue that sizable force at Crump's to act IAW Jomini as "Strategic Reserve" [Art of War pages 128 - 135.] Cheers Ozzy
  32. 1 point
    The American Battlefield Trust has begun 2019 with a bang, publishing "Shiloh in 4 Minutes" on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ipNrAvDIO8U Post of 16 JAN 2019: Shiloh in 4 Featuring the narration and analysis of Dr. Timothy B. Smith, this fact-packed episode introduces Fraley Field; discusses the timing and drivers of Confederate movement north; General Grant trading space for time on Day One (with the arrival of Federal reinforcements making certain the outcome on Day Two.) It would be a challenge for anyone to do a better job of summarizing Battle of Shiloh. Bravo Zulu!
  33. 1 point
    One of the "unexplained periods" of time involving General U.S. Grant in the hours leading up to Battle of Shiloh: "Where was the General after he left Pittsburg Landing, evening of Friday, April 4th (following his horse fall) until 3 p.m. on April 5th (recorded at Jacob Ammen's camp)?" Everything I have read is conjecture: Some suppose he visited Pittsburg Landing on Saturday morning; others claim that Grant "attempted to rest, but without much success, following his horse fall." There is evidence that General Grant's inspection of Prentiss' Sixth Division -- slated for April 5th -- was cancelled. And Colonel McPherson's work on the Snake Creek Bridge was suspended (and the Colonel directed to survey a campsite in vicinity of Hamburg for Don Carlos Buell's troops); but there is no evidence that Grant was in company with McPherson during that survey. During the period in question, where was General Grant?
  34. 1 point
    At the beginning of the 19th Century, Napoleon was seen as "the greatest military leader of recent times," and French was naturally the language to be learned in order to facilitate the study of Napoleon and his strategy and tactics. In the process, French terms for military ranks, units, movements, weaponry, etc were reaffirmed as "the correct terms" for universal understanding (and new French terms were incorporated into American military terminology.) The following link: a publication provided to American soldiers deployed to Europe in 1917 (with attention being directed to French Military Terms on pages 7 - 16.) https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=uc1.$b260555;view=1up;seq=5 French for the Army and Navy (1917). [And for a brief discussion of how French military tactics influenced the course of instruction at West Point: https://www.historynet.com/french-lessons-west-point.htm French Lessons at West Point, initially taught by Francis De Masson from 1803 - 1812 and making certain that military terms such as bastion, glacis and abatis were incorporated, and followed later by empennage, fuselage, nacelle, and aileron (when the airplane entered service.]
  35. 1 point
    Also..Grant was a pretty good artist.
  36. 1 point
    During this "quiet season," here are a few more bits of wit attributed to U. S. Grant: General Grant was asked, "What would you have done with Gideon Pillow if you had captured him at Fort Donelson?" The General pondered, then replied, "Why, I would have turned him loose, of course. It's much better for us to have Pillow in command of Rebels, than tucked away as a prisoner." "What is your favorite music, General?" someone asked Grant. The question caught Ulysses S. Grant (a man who believed "music" was one of the triggers for migraine headache) momentarily off guard. "I have no ear for music," he replied. "In fact, I only know two tunes: one is "Yankee Doodle," and the other isn't." U.S. Grant was the first United States President to play golf... but not very well. During one outing, he is reported to have swung at the ball -- and missed -- more than he made contact. When asked afterwards, "What do you think of golf, General Grant?" the President replied, "Very good exercise," and nodded. "But, I fail to see the purpose of the little ball."
  37. 1 point
    Mona The 1983 Shelby Foote interview is mentioned on google in the following format: MPB Classics: Postscripts: Shelby Foote -- A 1983 conversation with Mississippi author and historian Shelby Foote and will be broadcast at 4:30 pm on Wednesday 9 JAN 2019: https://www.tvpassport.com/tv-listings/stations/pbs-mississippi-public-broadcasting/2200 (scroll down to 4:30 pm.) [Note: On closer examination, the "tvpassport.com" site automatically converted to Adelaide Time, so 4:30 was Australia Central Daylight Savings Time... which was over four hours ago. Don't know when Mississippi Public Broadasting intends to run the programme again...]
  38. 1 point
    This was an interesting interview..and Ive always loved to hear him speak..maybe go to Mississippi Public Broadcast TV and look for pod cast there...
  39. 1 point
    5...Julia...after she saw this picture she didnt like the "two storied" beard appearance and also disapproved of his hat..that even to me ..seems a size or two too same.
  40. 1 point
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  45. 1 point
    #7---False..yes Grant did suffer with terrible migranes but alcohol was never used. He opted for mustard plasters and treatment like this.The migrane attacks did render him down and out which may have fulled the talk of drinking to point of passing out..but it was the migranes that laid him out.Also ,he contracted malaria in 1852 while in Isthmus of Panama and this condition also puts one to bed and even after"recovery" flare ups do return.So either medical condition or both arising at the same time would really prostrate him to sick bed.
  46. 1 point
    Stan Part of the difficulty with tracking troop movements during Battle of Shiloh -- USA and CSA -- results from lack of a standardized time. Although the U.S. Navy (in form of two timberclads) possessed highly accurate Time, no use of that Time was made by the U.S. Army (content with setting watches by "meridian passage" i.e. "high noon.") Probably, Confederate soldiers set their time pieces by meridian passage, too. It would be possible to "backward engineer" one correct time for actions and movements during Battle of Shiloh... except, allowance would still be necessary for "estimated time" and "fabricated time" (such as "Grant's arrival on Sunday morning at Pittsburg Landing.") Perhaps, a challenge too immense... Regards Ozzy
  47. 1 point
    Mona In a Letter dated 3 APR 1862 to wife Julia, General Grant indicated "he sent his watch (an heirloom from his brother, Simpson) home, in trust of Mr. Safford of Cairo Illinois" [Papers US Grant, vol. 5 pages 7 - 8.] Although General Grant had sent for a replacement (a plain, silver watch) there was no opportunity for that timepiece to arrive before Battle of Shiloh. Cheers Ozzy
  48. 1 point
    have you read where Grant did not have his time piece with him.I read this a few days ago.
  49. 1 point
    Upon reading the posts at SDG, it is evident that Confederate Cavalry officer, Basil Duke, is a favourite of many. A veteran of the Battle of Shiloh, who afterwards became involved with the progress of Shiloh Memorial Park (which eventually became Shiloh NMP), and who was often invited as Speaker at Dedication events... But, unknown to most, is that prior to the Civil War, Basil Duke was a base ball player. Born in Kentucky in 1838, Basil Duke took his Law degree earned at Transylvania College west and settled in St. Louis, where he joined his cousin's law firm and became involved in militia activities and base ball. A member of the Cyclones in time for the 1860 season, he played against other St. Louis clubs named Morning Stars, Unions, Tigers, Excelsiors, Independents and Empires, on fields around the city, recorded as Lafayette Park, Laclede Ground, Commercial Ground, Gamble Lawn Ground, and "the field immediately west of the Fair Grounds." In 1861, Basil Duke missed the March opening of the Season (away with "other activities") and as far as is known, never played for the Cyclones again. During 1861, the young man returned to Kentucky and signed on with another cousin: John Hunt Morgan. Base ball (spelled as two words) continued in St. Louis during the War (but often involved the club's "second nine," with their First Nine being otherwise engaged.) References: http://www.matrixgames.com/forums/printable.asp?m=1836953 Basil Duke and the St. Louis Cyclones http://thisgameofgames.com/home/category/basil-duke/ Jeffery Kittel's excellent Civil War baseball site (with focus on St. Louis) http://digital.shsmo.org/cdm/compoundobject/collection/dmr/id/17105/rec/5 Missouri Daily Republican of 5 June 1863 with box score for Game played at the Commercial Ground between the Baltics and the Independents (won by Baltics 33 - 14) recorded page 3 Col. 5 (bottom). http://digital.shsmo.org/cdm/compoundobject/collection/dmr/id/11906/rec/19 Missouri Daily Republican of 9 July 1860 page 2, Col.10 announcing Game to be played that afternoon at 4 p.m. between the Cyclones and Morning Stars.
  50. 1 point
    hi--! saw yesterday where I hope it's you had posted that you are bringing a college group down this weekend?If so let me know you're schedule and I can tag catch up with youall and tag along .Always learn someting on every group hike I can attend and sat are good fro Iam off after midday and can start up with you after youre lunch break so please let me know. Mona
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