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  1. 3 points
    I located Sgt. William H. Busbey's post-war article about his being near Grant's Savannah headquarters and on Tigress during the trip to Pittsburg Landing on April 6th in the Chicago Inter-Ocean. Some obvious errors make it not completely reliable, and it may be completely unreliable, but it does make for interesting reading: "I was at Savannah in April, 1862, associated with the work of the Adams Express company . Myself and another young man employed in the same office were sleeping on the night of April 5 in a house in Savannah three or four blocks from the river. General Grant's headquarters at Savannah were in a house very close to the river. We were on higher ground than he was, and about daylight on the morning of April 6 the young man sleeping with me jumped out of bed with the exclamation, 'There's firing up at the Landing.' We could hear very distinctly the boom of cannon, and when we went to the east window we could hear, or thought we could hear, the sound of musketry. Pittsburg landing was nine miles away, but in the still morning air the roar of musketry came to us." "We dressed hurriedly, ran down to General Grant's headquarters, where we found General Webster, chief of artillery, in his night shirt on the porch listening intently to the sound of firing. We saw him run into the house, and another officer came out with him. They listened a minute, ran in again, and General Grant came out in his night dress. The three figures stood like statues while Grant listened, and then the General gave an order that put everything in a whirl. Ned Osborne of Chicago was at that time in command of Grant's headquarters guard, and under excitement he was a very active man." "In a few minutes staff officers were awake and dressed, the escort was mounted and ready to go, and the General and staff boarded at once the steamer Tigress. I remembered as I looked over the steamers at the landing tht the Tigress was the only vessel that had steam up, and comprehending that Grant would go on that vessel, my comrade and myself went down and climbed on in advance of the General and his staff. There was a ittle wait for the escort and horses of the officers, but when all were on board the steamer did not move. Inquiry developed the fact that neither the captain nor the pilot was awake or had received any notice of the journey. They were stirred up in short order, and soon the Tigress started up the river for Pittsburg Landing." "About four miles above Savannah we came to Crump's landing. General Lew Wallace, in command of the division at that point, was on the steamer Jessie K. Bell. When we came up within fifty yards of the Bell, Grant shouted to Wallace, asking if he had any news from the front. Wallace shouted back saying that a courier had just arrived with the report that Sherman had been attacked by a heavy force. Grant, with great intensity of manner, asked: 'Does the dispatch say a heavy force?' Wallace replied that it did and Grant ordered the captain of the Tigress to make all possible speed for Pittsburg Landing." "As we started General Wallace shouted in surprise: 'General Grant, have you no orders for me?' and Grant, after thinking a moment, shouted back, 'Hold yourself in readiness to march.' Then we steamed away, but in a few minutes Ross came to me and said: 'It is a general attack this time, sure.' I asked him how he knew and he said that Captain Baxter had just received orders from Grant to take a steam tug and carry orders back to General Wallace to move at once and take position on the right of the Union force engaged in battle. We arrived at Pittsburg Landing in a short time and General Grant rode away at once toward the front." [The article went on about Busbey's experiences in the battle, including hauling guns up the bluff for Webster, the boats in the river, and Mother Bickerdyke.]
  2. 2 points
    Of more importance to the Battle of Shiloh is the observation of General Bragg as to the condition of the Confederate Army concentrating in Corinth. Bragg was appalled at the supply situation and the discipline of the troops. He called them, "a mob" and not an Army. He was ordered to get them some training and to do his best to prepare them for Battle. Their weapons were inferior. They had plenty of cannons, but not enough trained crews to man them. A point to make for the Battle of Shiloh-- Johnston went in on a hope and a prayer that surprise and the bayonet would win the day. Braxton Bragg agreed with that after what he witnessed. Not saying the Southerners were not brave or worthy, just that they were thrown into Battle with little formal training and a lack of needed supplies-- Class A firearms one of them...
  3. 2 points
    As we know, after his defeat at Pea Ridge, Arkansas (also known as Elkhorn Tavern) Major General Earl Van Dorn of the Trans-Mississippi was requested to support the forces of General Albert Sidney Johnston in Tennessee… but there was no apparent urgency in the request. Van Dorn arrived at Memphis about 8 April 1862 and stopped at The Gayoso House. Also in Memphis was Mrs. Mary Ann Webster Loughborough, whose husband James, was a Captain on the Staff of Brigadier General Cockrell. Mary Webster of New York married James Loughborough in Kentucky a few years earlier; then the couple moved west and established themselves in St. Louis, Missouri (and subsequently gravitated towards the Rebel cause.) In early April 1862 Mrs. Loughborough wrote the following letter to a friend, revealing the presence of notable Confederates in Memphis: Gayoso House, Memphis, April, 1862. My dear J——: I am just in from dinner; and you would be amused to see the different faces—I might as well say the different appetites; for the Army of Missouri and Arkansas have been undergoing rigorous fasts of late; and the little episode of the battle of Elkhorn and the consequent privations have helped not a little the gaunt appearance of these military characters. All eat, eat rapidly; from General V—— D—— down to the smallest lieutenant, whose manner of playing the epicure over the different dishes ordered, is a study. The confidential consultations with the waiter over them, together with the knowing unconsciousness of bestowing his small change, almost convinces me that he is a brigadier-general, or a colonel, at least. You see streaming in constantly this tide of human beings, to eat, stare at the ladies, talk, and order much wine in the excitement of military anecdotes; for you must understand that a civilian is a “rara avis” amid the brilliant uniforms of the dining room. Yet, amid all this mass and huge crowd, the majority are polished gentlemen, who have evidently seen much of the world, and who are men of purpose and character. General V—— D—— and staff sit not far from me—looked at rather jealously by the Missourians, as ranking and commanding them over their favorite general. Yet, he always treats the old general with the utmost consideration and courtesy. On the other side sits General P——, with his kind, benevolent face. The poor old gentleman finds at the table his lightest reserves become his heaviest forces: nearly all his staff are about him. And, as I sit half amused at the expression of some faces, and thinking deeply of the mute, yet determined impress of character on others, two gentlemen come in—one in plain citizen’s clothing, with heavy black beard and high forehead—with stooping gait and hands behind him. I am told he is Governor J——, of Missouri. His face puzzles me—it is thoughtful and singular. By his side, with tall, lithe, slender figure, fully erect, walks General J—— T——. You will scarcely think it possible that this is the so-frequently talked of J—— T——. I thought him an ordinary man, did not you? Yet, this is anything but an ordinary man. The keen dark eye sweeps the room as he enters, taking us all in at a glance—a quick, daring, decisive, resolute face. I can make nothing more out of him. Yet, there is more of thought and intellect than you see at first. He is dressed in full uniform, with sword and sash, and has quite a military air. There are many Saint Louisians here; you see them scattered around the tables quite plentifully. General C—— is among the number. He sits at some distance, and looks quite worn and sad. You know—do you not?—that he is the father of young Churchill Clark, who was killed at Elkhorn. Have I ever told you his history? It is this: He graduated at West Point in the commencement of the war; and knowing and having a great admiration for General P——, he joined him at once: he was put in command of some artillery; and showing himself a youth of courage and ability—for he was only twenty years old—his command was increased. Throughout the constant trials and sufferings of the campaign, he showed himself equal in courage, daring, and judgment, to many older heads. He was particularly beloved by General P——. At Elkhorn, as ever, his battery sustained itself with coolness and bravery. As the general rode by, he said some cheering words to young Clark, who took off his cap and waved it, saying, “General, we will hold our own,” or words to that effect, when a ball sped from the enemy, and crashed in the young, ardent brain as he spoke. I have been told that the general was affected to tears. He knelt by his side, vainly seeking for some trace of the strong, young life, but the pulses were stilled forever; and Churchill Clark lay a stiffened corpse in the long, wet grass at Elkhorn. And so his father sits silent and alone, and all respect the grief that none can assuage. In a few days we leave. The gentlemen all go to Corinth, where a battle, in all probability, will take place before long. Fort Pillow can hardly hold out, under the daily bombardment that we hear from the gunboats; and if it falls, Memphis, on taking leave of the Confederate officers, will usher in the Federal to quarters in the Gayoso. Adieu.
  4. 2 points
  5. 2 points
    Thanks for this. Another little piece of Civil War Chicagoiana to add to my collection. Rumsey was late to his own funeral...but for a poignant reason.
  6. 2 points
    Great photo... and of benefit to learn that the significant action in the Plum Orchard has finally been recognized... 🙂
  7. 2 points
    maybe due to the addition of "Plum Orchard Rd"
  8. 2 points
    There are two pieces of communication (one constructed on April 5th, and the other generated on April 6th 1862) both of which are important in their own way to explain “how the Battle of Shiloh unfolded.” And both documents have "issues." The first item is a telegram constructed at St. Louis and sent under signature of Major General Henry Halleck on Saturday 5 April 1862. Fitting Halleck’s style of issuing concise orders, the two-line telegram begins by listing the recently promoted Major Generals by order of seniority: Buell, Pope, McClernand, C.F. Smith, Wallace. The inclusion of John Pope is significant because Major General Pope would soon join the Advance on Corinth. And the place held by John McClernand (ahead of Charles Ferguson Smith) may have come as a surprise to Major General Ulysses S. Grant… but no matter, as the late formal notice of MGen McClernand’s seniority did not provide opportunity to ‘Provide him with benefits of seniority to which he was entitled” i.e., the Shell Game played by Generals Grant, Smith, Sherman and Captain McMichael had worked perfectly; and now, at this late hour, McClernand would be notified in due course of his official seniority (likely after U.S. Grant established his HQ at Pittsburg Landing… When McClernand operating as “acting commander” had odds somewhere between Slim and None.) The second line of Halleck’s telegram reads: “You will act in concert [with General Buell] but he will exercise his separate command, unless the enemy should attack you. In that case you are authorized to take the general command.” The wording of this second line, giving Grant emergency authority over Buell in case of attack by Rebels, has significant implications. And yet, when the conduct of Day Two at Shiloh is closely examined, there is nothing more significant in regard to General Grant exercising command, than, “You take the left; and I’ll take the right” during the advance of Monday morning (coordination at its most minimal.) Which leads one to ponder: When did General Grant receive this telegram from Henry Halleck? If it was sent by telegraph from St. Louis late morning of April 5th, it likely arrived at the Fort Henry telegraph office before noon. If a steamer picked up the mail and telegraph traffic at 1 p.m., (perhaps the Minnehaha) then the 5 April telegram would arrive about midnight… plenty of time for Grant to read and understand the contents. But, at 2 p.m. on Sunday, April 6th, where was this telegram from Halleck? The cool indifference shared between Grant and Buell (with Buell simply left at the waterfront, while Grant headed away west to take care of business) does not represent “someone in possession of an important telegram, giving them extraordinary authority.” Instead, it seems to indicate General Grant has not yet received the telegram; or he has seen it… but left it behind at the Cherry Mansion. The second communication was constructed on Sunday morning by Captain A.S. Baxter, the AQM for Grant’s Army, as he rode the steamer Tigress north to relay Grant’s orders (likely relayed from Grant, through Captain John Rawlins, to Baxter.) Finding the orders complex and difficult to remember in detail, Captain Algernon Baxter scanned the floor of the Ladies’ Cabin, found a soiled bit of paper, and wrote the orders (as he best remembered them) onto that scrap (later recorded as “containing a heel mark and tobacco stain.”) Upon arrival at Crump’s Landing, Captain Baxter found Lieutenant Ross – Aide to Major General Wallace – waiting. The two rode away west and reported to MGen Wallace at, or just before 11:30 a.m. Captain Baxter presented General Wallace with the impromptu order; Wallace asked why it was not signed. Baxter explained he “created the memorandum, himself, out of fear he would “forget some detail” unless he did so.” General Wallace passed the “written order” to his Staff, and asked Baxter about the current state of affairs [Baxter left Pittsburg Landing between 10 and 10:30.] Captain Baxter replied, “We are driving them.” General Wallace was satisfied; Wallace’s staff officers were satisfied. The order was accepted, and Captain Baxter took his departure within three minutes of arrival at Stony Lonesome. Captain Frederick Kneffler, Lew Wallace’s AAG, wound up with the “written order.” He tucked it under his sword belt… and subsequently lost it. Ever since, the loss of that written order, or memorandum, has been significant because it would provide tangible proof of what Major General Wallace had been ordered to do. And, it is not difficult to envision the memorandum, jiggling loose from Captain Kneffler’s sword belt, and blowing away… to be beaten by heavy rain that night; ultimately washed into the Snake River, then Tennessee River… lost forever. But, paper was in short supply, always. Letters by soldiers were often written making use of every millimetre of space, including margins and borders. As likely as the memorandum being lost forever, it was just as likely noticed, clinging to trampled stubble, by some soldier… one of thousands following behind Kneffler on his horse. This soldier would have snatched it up, and possibly sent it as souvenir with his own letter, a few days later. My point: there is every chance that the Lew Wallace memorandum from Baxter still exists, contained in a box of Civil War letters and paraphernalia, and the owners have no idea what they have in their possession. But, with all the other material being revealed on a weekly basis, one day this piece of history might just surprise everyone, and re-emerge.
  9. 2 points
    [Part three of Corinth, interrupted] Grant’s operation, with HQ at Savannah was kept on the back burner: just active enough to keep Rebel commanders guessing, but not sufficiently robust to allow General Grant to take the reins pre-emptively. The first benefit to Grant from success further west was assignment of Benjamin Prentiss to command of the newly created Sixth Division (although Halleck tasked Brigadier General Prentiss with other duties enroute, delaying his ultimate arrival at Pittsburg Landing.) In addition, Grant was aware that Don Carlos Buell was marching south and west to effect a join at Savannah (but Grant was frustrated by the slow pace of the Army of the Ohio.) Still, these troop additions were approved by Halleck, and were part of the overall plan to initiate the Operation against Corinth, in the proper sequence… after Victory at Island No.10 (when another source of manpower (Pope), as well as ammunition and abundant supplies would be made available.) References: SDG topics “Just supposin’ begun 26 FEB 2018 and “Full Hospitals” begun 30 JAN 2018 for Prentiss tasks enroute to Savannah Tennessee. SDG topic “Grant’s six divisions” begun 1 DEC 2018 details growth of Pittsburg force. OR 8 pages 633 – 4 telegram (23 MAR 1862) in which Henry Halleck lays out his “Programme” for SecWar Stanton, which includes, “Pope’s progress is necessarily slow,” and, “I have directed General Grant to make no move until Buell’s column (now at Columbia) can form junction with him.” Also, Halleck asserts, “We must take Corinth in order to seriously injure Rebel communications.” [And Halleck proposes possible moves for T.W. Sherman (the other Sherman) and Benjamin Butler which “might take advantage of [Bragg’s Army] leaving Florida and Alabama.”] OR 8 page 631 communication of 21 MAR 1862 from MGen Halleck to F/O Foote: “Everything is progressing well on the Tennessee River towards opening your way down the Mississippi.” [Illustrates the “connected” nature of Halleck’s operations, and alludes to the “proper sequence” of those operations.] OR 8 page 643 telegram from Army AG Thomas to MGen Halleck of 25 MAR 1862: “BGen Thomas Davies has been assigned duty in Department of the Mississippi.” [In preparation for conduct of operations after success at Island No.10 Halleck has called for more trained general officers to assist, as part of Halleck’s program. General Thomas Davies will be assigned command of Second Division, following deaths of WHL Wallace… and C.F. Smith.] OR 8 page 649 telegram SecWar Stanton to MGen Halleck of 29 MAR 1862: “You will report without delay the strength and distribution of your command.” [Halleck’s response 30 March: “Buell 101,000 in KY and Tenn; Grant 75,000 in Tennessee; Pope 25000 at New Madrid; Curtis 23000 in Arkansas; Strong 9000 District of Cairo; Steele 6000 in Arkansas; Schofield 15000 District of St. Louis (including new regiments at Benton Barracks); Totten 4000 in Central Missouri; Loan 2000 in Northern Missouri; about 10000 men in Kansas, Nebraska and Colorado.”] And follows telegram of Halleck to Stanton of 28 MAR 1862 revealing “elevated level of sickness experienced by men on Tennessee River expedition” (and lays blame on brigade and regimental surgeons of volunteers.) One-in-three reported sick, and is of concern because Halleck intends to make use of Grant’s Army… soon. OR 8 page 660 communication MGen Halleck to F/O Andrew Foote of 5 APR 1862: “I shall want a gunboat at Cairo ready to go up the Tennessee River in the early part of next week.” [With the successful run of USS Carondelet past the guns of Island No.10 on April 4th, Halleck knows it is “a matter of days” before Pope crosses his army and forces the trapped Rebels to surrender (in rear of Island No.10).] OR 8 page 661 communication Halleck to MGen Samuel Curtis (Army of the Southwest) on April 5th 1862: “Price and Van Dorn will soon leave your front [and the great battle of the war is to be fought on the Tennessee River.]” OR 8 page 672 telegram Halleck to Stanton of 7 APR 1862: “Buell’s advance force has reached Grant; entire force will connect in two or three days” [sent before news arrived at St. Louis IRT Battle of Shiloh initiated early 6 APR 1862.] OR 8 page 676 communication of 8 APR 1862 from Assistant Secretary of War Thomas Scott to Henry Halleck, alluding to “sequence of events” after Surrender of Island No.10.
  10. 2 points
    and found in the area of this high ground were numerous springs...good water..army is fueled by coffee. unlike what was to be had in Corinth later...
  11. 2 points
    Then again, I don't know how much that time mattered. The Confederates were disorganized, thus part of the reason they stopped. Had they continued on the attack, being so disorganized, I venture that the disorganization would have caused even more ill coordinated attacks, and potentially, disaster for the Confederates, if that makes sense.
  12. 1 point
    i do not knowhow to put a link here but yall can go to find a grave to see his headstone..the original is somewhat unique--at least to me--under his name has US and CSA
  13. 1 point
    Mona Thanks for providing the additional information on Samuel Cooper (whose last act with the U.S. Government, before resigning, is said to have been the Dismissal of Twiggs.) The ranking of Cooper as General Number One also led to animosity in the Confederate Army... Joseph Johnston, in particular, who considered everyone ranked above him as "undeserving." Some additional links of interest, added because until running across Cooper's Militia Tactics, the number of different bugle calls and drum rolls for "regulating" soldiers in battle, and day-to-day activities, was assumed to be far fewer than turns out: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PXC5BktPnWM Boots and Saddles (cavalry readiness alert) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0fvkihdRV5g A variety of Civil War drum alerts.
  14. 1 point
    Samuel Cooper After graduation commisioned Lt in Army light Artillery until 1837.Then he was appt. Chief Clerk of the US War Dept which he held until 1842 he was promoted to Col. and served in the Seminole War.he also saw action in the Mexican war.In 1852 he was promoted to Adj. General.He resigned his position in March 1861 to join the Confederate Army in Brigadier General;.He was asigned Adjutant and Inspector general of the Confederate Army directly under Jefferson Davis the entire war. 1862 he was promoted to full general..His final act was to preserve all records of the Confederate Army and turn them over to the US Govt.He retired to his plantation in VA until his death in 12-3-1876.He is buried in Christ Church Episcopol Cemetery in Alexandria VA..
  15. 1 point
    in today's light we can find alot of flaws in this film but in its defense..it was the first film portrayed for viewing at a battlefield, really reinacting had not come around as we know today so they recruited theater students from memphis state and there was a connection down in mississippi so several students from school there came up to portray soldiers and a factory there made some uniforms..and several locals were involved. and at this time i believe they did as well as could be on the animation .i believe it opened the door to all we have today in portraying battle action documentaries that we all view today.
  16. 1 point
    It took a couple of days for word to reach the villages and farms in the North that a massive contest had taken place along the bank of the Tennessee River. And the initial reports seemed to indicate “another Union victory, with moderate casualties,” such as resulted for the Union at Fort Henry and Fort Donelson and Island No.10 …but after those initial reports, other stories began to appear, not just from embedded reporters, but letters and other eyewitness accounts from soldiers themselves, and these presented sensational details at odds with the initial rosy narrative. And these details grew progressively horrific: not hundreds of casualties, but thousands… maybe tens of thousands… Suddenly, Casualty Lists were in demand; but the Northern newspapers could not provide them. As occurred after Forts Henry and Donelson, the regional papers contacted Chicago for details… and were given only Chicago-specific lists of casualties. And the Horror of Shiloh continued, with full Casualty Lists never appearing in most Northern newspapers: the affected families were slowly and sporadically informed of the fate of their loved ones by mail: comrades of their sons and fathers who knew what happened (or thought they did); and official letters of condolence when facts could be positively determined. Meanwhile, the waiting, and not knowing, became almost intolerable… Unknown to the people in the North, one newspaper had taken extraordinary steps to compile a Master Casualty List of Wounded Men, and that paper was not in Chicago or Cincinnati, but St. Louis. Beginning with the April 15th edition, the Daily Missouri Republican published names of wounded men who arrived at St. Louis aboard the Hospital boat, D.A. January (two full columns on Page One.) And although Hospital boats Crescent City and City of Louisiana soon arrived at St. Louis, other boats pressed into service as floating Hospitals offloaded their human cargo at New Albany, Evansville, Cincinnati, Louisville, Paducah and Cairo; the Daily Missouri Republican “borrowed” reports from local papers of those river ports and repeated them on the pages of the St. Louis paper: • 17 APR page 3 Minnehaha wounded offloaded at Louisville (CSA and USA) • 18 APR page 1 John J. Roe casualties offloaded at Evansville • 19 APR page 1 War Eagle casualties arrived St. Louis • 19 APR page 2 Empress casualties arrived at St. Louis • 19 APR page 3 Magnolia casualties arrived Cincinnati • 20 APR page 1 Imperial casualties arrived St. Louis • 20 APR page 1 Black Hawk casualties arrived Cairo • 20 APR page 2 Tycoon casualties arrived 17 APR at Cincinnati • 20 APR page 2 Lancaster casualties arrived at Cincinnati • 20 APR page 2 B. J. Adams casualties arrived New Albany In addition, edition for 22 APR page 3 lists all of the Hospitals in St. Louis where the wounded men from Pittsburg Landing were housed. Shortly after his arrival at Pittsburg Landing, Henry Halleck sent a telegram to Brigadier General Strong at Cairo (15 APR 1862): “All the wounded have been sent to Hospital. Stop all sanitary commissions, nurses and citizens. We don’t want any more.” References: Daily Missouri Republican, issues 9 APR through 23 APR 1862 and available: https://digital.shsmo.org/digital/collection/dmr/id/15091/rec/3182 Missouri Daily Republican for 15 APR 1862 https://digital.shsmo.org/digital/collection/dmr/search/page/318 Access to all editions of Missouri Daily Republican at State Historical Society of Missouri Note: The first known reference published in the North referred to “an attack against our forces at Pittsburg Landing by Beauregard” went to print on 8 APR 1862 and was discredited as “a rumor from Paducah.” The second reference to the Battle of Pittsburg Landing was published 9 APR 1862 and was a telegram sent from Henry Halleck to SecWar Stanton on April 8, full contents of which: “The enemy attacked our forces at Pittsburg Tennessee yesterday (April 7) but was repulsed with heavy loss. No details given.” Further note: Beginning 15 APR 1862 the same editions of this newspaper contained names and details of Confederate prisoners captured at Battle of Pittsburg Landing and transported to St. Louis and elsewhere (initially aboard steamer, Woodfolk -- see page one, column 6.)
  17. 1 point
    i hope they will make the entire..if not the shiloh section ..available omline..because inquirying minds want to read.
  18. 1 point
    Mona The other Federal units to recruit men from Savannah and Hardin County in March and April 1862 were the 40th Illinois (Hicks) the 46th Ohio (Worthington) the USS Lexington (Shirk) the USS Tyler (Gwin) and the USS Alfred Robb. The Roster for the 40th Illinois includes names of Tennessee men recruited into Company C, and Colonel Thomas Worthington recorded names of the Savannah men recruited into his Companies A, B, D, G, I and K (on a slip of paper he compiled a day or two after the Battle of Shiloh, because I believe the camp of the 46th Ohio was overrun and their records lost.) The three gunboats would all have names of recruits entered in their Logbooks. Unfortunately, only select pages of the Operational History (Ledger) of the 14th Iowa Infantry are available online… at the present time. As regards Lewis Sutton’s father, Philip: he survived the war, returned to Mount Pleasant, Iowa and lived until November 1880. Cheers Ozzy
  19. 1 point
    i wish the men that enlisted at savannah was accessable.i cant find it anywhere.. i wonder if his father ,phillip, survived the war he's death date is?? on find a grave. interesting .
  20. 1 point
    Fifty years after the end of the Civil War, an astute author realized that the men who had made History, and their stories were in imminent danger of being lost forever. So, Mamie Yeary set out across Texas (and had manuscripts sent her) to record as many “average Johnnies” as possible. Their stories, brief and poignant, leave the reader “wishing for more” …which may be possible, because many kept diaries; and almost all wrote letters during the war. And, with a name (and combat unit designation) we now have a starting point… especially for the scores of Confederate Shiloh veterans who made these pages: https://archive.org/details/reminiscencesofbv1year/page/1 Reminiscences of the Boys in Gray (1912) by Mamie Yeary. https://archive.org/details/reminiscencesofb00year/page/n5 Reminiscences (Vol.2) [See pages 428 - 9 William Lee 6th Arkansas; pp.515 - 7 John Middleton 23rd Tennessee, for examples of what is available by searching for "Shiloh." Also, pp. 884 - 890 lists almost every skirmish and battle in Tennessee (and surrounding pages list almost every skirmish, action and battle in every State during the 1861 - 1865 War.)]
  21. 1 point
    Mona Thanks for having a look at the Mankato article IRT the Battle of Shiloh (but focusing on the performance of Munch's 1st Minnesota Battery.) The info concerning Munch and Pfaender and Peebles is quite good, and some of it was new to me. But the general background relating the Battle of Shiloh: at least eleven errors... Ouch!
  22. 1 point
    Thanks to Manassas Belle for posting one of the very few available Letters from James Birdseye McPherson: an extraordinary man and gifted Union officer. I stumbled upon a recent video that acts as solid Biography of McPherson, and this looks to be a good place to post it. As we know, James Birdseye McPherson eventually rose to the rank of Major General and became one of U.S. Grant’s most trusted and most valuable officers, contributing mightily to the success at Vicksburg in 1863. Prior to Vicksburg, McPherson played a couple of interesting roles at Pittsburg Landing. But McPherson commenced his active Civil War career as Lieutenant Colonel, assigned to the Staff of Henry Halleck at St. Louis. Before the Campaign against Fort Henry, LtCol McPherson joined Brigadier General Grant’s embryonic army… and never left. McPherson rose to eventual command of the Army of the Tennessee (after Sherman, and before Logan, Howard, Logan.) The link below is to a c-span video discussing the Military Career of James B. McPherson, conducted by Steven E. Woodworth. The introduction is provided by a Civil War reenactor, playing the role of another Shiloh participant, Andrew Hickenlooper. And the most important segments of the video run from the 9 minute 30 second mark (McPherson joins Halleck at St. Louis) to the 28 minute mark (conclusion of Battle of Shiloh.) https://www.c-span.org/video/?320621-1/discussion-james-b-mcpherson-army-tennessee Presented at Clyde, Ohio July 2014 (150 years after death of McPherson.)
  23. 1 point
    Okay folks, we have our subjects set for our Epic Trek with historian Tim Smith on November 2nd. This year we're returning to our original format of examining two different subjects rather than just one, and I hope you agree that they're good choices. More details will be posted soon, but here's an overview for now: Our morning hike will focus on Union General Benjamin Prentiss and his controversial role in the battle and its aftermath. Did Prentiss save Grant's army, as we often hear, or is there more to the story? And was he responsible for alerting the Union army to the danger that morning, or was he, like Sherman and Grant, taken by surprise when the attack hit? We'll delve into these issues, and visit several sites around the battlefield associated with Prentiss, including his defensive position in the legendary Hornets Nest. (We may also have a chance to recreate a late 19th Century photograph that included the General.) After a break for lunch, our afternoon hike will be a subject suggested by SDG member Jim Franklin - we'll follow the Confederate approach to Grants Last Line, examining the challenges they faced and discussing the controversy that erupted after the battle over this aborted attack. Did Beauregard make the right call here, or should the Confederates have continued the attack? See the terrain in person and decide for yourself. A big thank you to Jim for the excellent idea! Again, more details will be posted soon. I'm already looking forward to the hikes, and seeing some familiar faces and hopefully some new ones as well. As always, feel free to post any questions you might have. Perry
  24. 1 point
    We all wound up getting a tick or two, but the Deep Woods Off pretty much took care of most and we only had to flick a couple away.
  25. 1 point
    From the Civilwarwisconsin web site: http://civilwarwisconsin.com/campfire-stories.html?start=45 After the evacuation of Corinth, Pittsburg Landing continued to be our base of supplies and commissary stores were wagoned from there to the various places where our troops were stationed. And it happened, while the regiment was at Bethel, that I was one of a party of about a hundred men detailed to serve as guards for a wagon train destined for the Landing and return to Bethel with army rations. There was at the Landing at this time, serving as guards for the government stores, a regiment of infantry. There were only a few of them visible, and they looked pale and emaciated, and much like dead men on their feet. I asked one of them what regiment was stationed there and he told me it was the 14th Wisconsin Infantry. This was the one I had seen at Benton Barracks and admired so much on account of the splendid appearance of the men. I mentioned this to the soldier, and expressed to him my surprise to now see them in such bad shape. He went on to tell me that the men suffered fearfully from the change of climate, the water, and their altered conditions in general that they had nearly all been prostrated by camp diarrhea and at that time there were not more than a hundred men in the regiment fit for duty, and even those were not much better that shadows of their former selves. And judging from the few men that were visible, the soldier told the plain, unvarnished truth. Our regiment and the 14th Wisconsin soon drifted apart, and I never saw it again. But as a matter of history, I will say that it made a excellent and distinguished record during the war. Leander stillwell 61st Illinois Infantry Jim
  26. 1 point
    In further consideration of Bohemians... Always happy to admit when I am wrong (well, maybe not happy, but I admit my mistakes, anyway.) In the case of Bohemians, and the use of the term in relation to the Intelligentsia who frequented Pfaff's Cave, I stumbled upon an early use of "Bohemian" while searching for information about the Wide Awake Movement. In the Chicago Press & Tribune of 6 APR 1860 on page 2 col.5 is a comprehensive description of Pfaff's Cave, and the patrons of that place... a full year before Civil War erupted: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82014511/1860-04-06/ed-1/seq-2/#date1=1860&sort=date&rows=20&words=Awakes&searchType=basic&sequence=0&index=12&state=Illinois&date2=1860&proxtext=Awakes&y=18&x=13&dateFilterType=yearRange&page=2 Amazing what can be found, when you're not looking Ozzy
  27. 1 point
    Mona Excellent question... because the above letters, detailing the movement of Van Dorn and Price from Arkansas (ultimately for service at Corinth) are to be found in Appendix at back of My Cave Life in Vicksburg, which was published in New York City in 1864. With the Civil War still in progress, I suspect that author Mary Ann Loughborough attempted to "shield" people and places from unnecessary scrutiny. For me, it was a surprise to find details of Price and Van Dorn in Memphis... in a book about Vicksburg. http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/35700?msg=welcome_stranger My Cave Life in Vicksburg [at Project Gutenberg] Cheers Ozzy
  28. 1 point
    Oh, that was so helpful to me. My gggrandther was McKoins. You are wonderful Ozzy, thank you so much. Nice to meet you both
  29. 1 point
    This is great to know.thanks!!
  30. 1 point
    Annie Wittenmyer, nurse and agent for the Iowa State Sanitary Commission, arrived at Savannah Tennessee aboard a Hospital steamer at 4 a.m. on 7 April 1862. There, the medical staff and passengers aboard the steamboat were informed, "Grant has been driven to the river; he and his Army are likely to be captured today." Hearing that news, "our Hospital boat raced for Pittsburg Landing..." They arrived before sunrise, and while the overnight Navy bombardment (one shell every 15 minutes) continued, and immediately set to work: feeding wounded men, dressing their wounds, providing them with water... The entire story runs pages 28 - 35 and is one of many Shiloh memories to be found in Under the Guns: A Woman's Reminiscences of the Civil War (1895) by Annie Wittenmyer. Other interesting stories to be discovered: pages 43 - 47 "U.S. Grant and the Issue of Passes" page 128 "A Painful Accident" [Governor Harvey of Wisconsin] page 164 "Searching for the Dead" [a Mother from Pennsylvania comes to Pittsburg Landing, looking for the grave of her son...] Also included are memories of the Siege of Vicksburg (and other campaigns). And there are tales of corruption and malpractice (involving Army surgeons and Sanitary Commission stores, and how they got away with their criminal behavior); and details of Generals (such as Grant and McPherson and Logan) not to be found anywhere else. https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=osu.32435008944803;view=1up;seq=1 Annie Wittenmyer's Under the Guns.
  31. 1 point
    Another day, another master’s thesis… and this one, submitted by William J. McCaffrey in 1970 is revealing, compelling, shocking. Although 140 pages long, this work grips the student of Battle of Shiloh by the throat, and does not let go. It examines “whether or not there was surprise at Pittsburg Landing on April 6th 1862”…and just who was surprised. On page three, a list of six items is posted: flawed conditions of readiness, at least one of which must be present to allow a Defender to get surprised by an Attacker. William McCaffrey devotes the remainder of his thesis to providing evidence of the presence of many of those six conditions of “un-readiness” at Pittsburg Landing in the days, hours and minutes leading up to General Albert Sidney Johnston’s attack. This report contains maps, an excellent list of references, and is constructed by a man concerned about “the lessons of History, and how to avoid the mistakes of History.” Have a read, and decide for yourself how close William McCaffrey, West Point Class of 1958, comes to the mark. Masters Thesis by William J. McCaffrey (1970) “Shiloh: a case study in Surprise” submitted to U.S. Army Command and General Staff College at Fort Leavenworth, KS and on file with National Technical Information Service: https://apps.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/733391.pdf
  32. 1 point
    We took a day trip over to Shiloh on Saturday to enjoy the beautiful weather and walk around for the day, also because it's pretty much been forever since we've stopped by the park. As is customary on every visit, we have our dog, Beauregard, pose for a picture next to his namesake road over by Fraley Field. Not sure why they replaced the old Beauregard sign, even the Visitors Center couldn't really give us an explanation as to why it happened, which is fine, it was simply curiosity if anything.
  33. 1 point
    On the above list of passengers aboard the Tigress, another name has been added: Douglas Putnam Born in Ohio in 1838, Douglas Putnam was trained as clerk (financial industry) and departed his home near Marietta before 1860 to settle in Galena Illinois (where he became friends with William Rowley, who joined the 45th Illinois Infantry late in 1861). Shortly after outbreak of war, Putnam offered his services as “financial agent” and became part of financial agency “I. N. Cook,” handling large sums and making regular disbursement of pay to soldiers in the Volunteer Army [reference to I. N. Cook found in Papers of US Grant vol.5 pages 139 - 140.] Putnam (a civilian contractor with no rank) was sent to Cairo about August 1861, assigned the duty of Paymaster. It was while serving at Cairo through that Winter that Douglas Putnam became associated with Richard Oglesby, John McClernand, Flag-Officer Andrew Foote, and Brigadier General Ulysses S. Grant. Subsequent to General Grant’s victory at Fort Donelson, and likely due the increased number of Staff accorded the new Major General, Grant remembered Douglas Putnam, and brought him into his “military family” as Paymaster. When General Grant was released from arrest in mid-March 1862, Paymaster Putnam was installed in his own office aboard Tigress, and made the voyage to Savannah Tennessee, arriving on the 17th. During the remainder of March and early April, Douglas Putnam was present at numerous “pay parades” and disbursed funds to the soldiers camped at Pittsburg Landing. But, his pay activities were put on hold when fighting erupted Sunday, April 6th. And with the conclusion of the Battle of Shiloh on April 7th, Putnam made his way north aboard a steamer bound for Cincinnati. Back in Ohio, he became part of the drive to get up the 92nd Ohio Volunteer Infantry. Needing a character witness, Douglas Putnam requested one from Major General Grant… who gladly provided that document to Governor David Tod of Ohio. Putnam joined the 92nd OVI as “First Lieutenant and Adjutant,” but was soon elevated to Major. And at the Battle of Chickamauga, Lieutenant Colonel Putnam was wounded (and wounded again on Missionary Ridge.) Douglas Putnam survived the war, returned briefly to Ohio, and then settled in Kentucky, where he became a Director of the Ashland Coal and Iron Railway Company for the rest of his life. References: “Reminiscences of the Battle of Shiloh” by LtCol Douglas Putnam, Jr. (1889) found in pages 197 – 211 of MOLLUS (Ohio Commandery) vol.3 (1890). https://archive.org/details/sketcheswarhist00commgoog/page/n201 https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=coo1.ark:/13960/t15m6t13x;view=1up;seq=1093 Biography of Jay Cooke, financier of the Union war effort (begins page 1037 of Ohio in the War: her statesmen, her generals… by Whitelaw Reid (1868). http://www.cincinnaticwrt.org/data/ccwrt_history/talks_text/moffat_soldiers_pay.html Soldiers Pay [during the Civil War] by William C. Moffatt (1965) [presented to Civil War Round Table of Cincinnati January 1965.] https://www.kcchronicle.com/2014/03/11/a-look-into-a-civil-war-strongbox/a8nooaz/ Examination of 200-pound Paymasters Box (11 MAR 2014) by Brenda Schory. Papers of US Grant vol.5 pages 139 – 140: MGen Grant to Governor Tod. https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/93324038/douglas-putnam Paymaster Douglas Putnam.
  34. 1 point
    in case some have not seen the Shiloh NPS site..yet...on Anniversary Sat..the have planned period baseball games..field yet to be determined.There is a organization in Tennessee that has several teams that play ball as was done back in the 1800's. This should be interesting! Just hope we have baseball weather this year.
  35. 1 point
    Camp Near Columbia April 3, 1862 MAJOR-GENERAL HALLECK: Dispatch of yesterday received. The troops at Camp Chase are only fragments, and scarecely more than enough to guard prisoners. I am taking along the division which I designed to have provisionally in front of Columbia. I am not altogether satisfied to do it, but have diminished the force nearer Nashville to remedy it. D. C. BUELL Camp Seven Miles South of Columbia April 3, 1862 9 p.m. MAJOR-GENERAL HALLECK: My troops all on the march. I move ahead to join the leading division, now 40 miles from Columbia. General Sturgis is in Nashville. I have telegraphed him to report to you in Saint Louis. If General Stanley is sent to me I shall be pleased to have him. D. C. BUELL Major-General Headquarters District of the Ohio Nashville, Tenn., April 3, 1862 SPECIAL ORDERS, NO. 5. V. Unless it conflicts with special instructions he may have received or may hereafter receive from the Postmaster-General, Col. A. H. Markland, special agent Post-Office Department, will continue with and take general supervision of the mails for the Army of the Ohio until further orders. By command of Major-General Buell (OLIVER D. GREENE) Assistant Adjutant-General Headquarters District of West Tennessee Savannah, April 3, 1862 GENERAL WILLIAM NELSON, Commanding Fourth Division, Buell's Army: Your advance has arrived here. All difficulties in our neighborhood will be remedied before your arrival. U. S. GRANT Major-General, Commanding Headquarters Sherman's Division Camp Shiloh, April 3, 1862 CAPT. JOHN A. RAWLINS, Assistant Adjutant-General, Steamboat Tigress: SIR: I inclose herewith report of Colonel Taylor of his scout last night, and send, in charge of a guard, with one of my aides, Captain Taylor, the two prisoners--one prisoner of the First Alabama Cavalry, and the other a citizen, Dr. Parkes. Colonel Taylor is a most intelligent officer, and is fully impressed with General Grant's views relative to the unjust arrest of citizens. My orders to him were to molest no citizen, farmer, or mechanic whom he found at home or engaged in his usual legitimate pursuits. But this Dr. Parkes he found at a farmhouse on his way out, and afterward found him beyond, with attending circumstances to show he had given the other pickets warning whom I expected near Greer's. My plan was to post in ambush Colonel Smith's regiment of Zouaves at Greer's on Lick Creek. They started at 8 o'clock p.m. last night, with two excellent guides. The cavalry of Colonel Taylor was to take the Corinth road and turn toward Greer's. He executed his orders, capturing one of the enemy's pickets, whom I send forthwith for General Grant to question, as he is pretty intelligent. The Dr. Parkes I also advise should be held prisoner for having given important information to the enemy. I have yet no reports from Colonel Smith, and expect him back momentarily, when I will communicate the result of his scout. I have the honor to be, your obedient servant, W. T. SHERMAN Brigadier-General, Commanding Division Headquarters Division Camp Shiloh, April 3, 1862 COLONEL BUCKLAND, Commanding Fourth Brigade: SIR: You may march your entire brigade to-day forward on the Corinth road about 3 miles, by way of drill and instruction. When you reach the hill, send companies as skirmishers to the right and left a mile or so. Do not molest people quietly at their usual occupation as farmers, mechanics, but all persons armed, uniformed, or suspicious bring in as prisoners. Keep your men together, unless detached as companies, and allow no firing unless you encounter an enemy. I am, &c., your obedient servant, W. T. SHERMAN Brigadier-General, Commanding Division
  36. 1 point
    From the Union standpoint, the Battle of Shiloh was not supposed to happen. Federal troops were sent south, under command of Brigadier General C.F. Smith, with intention of cutting rail lines and disrupting Rebel communications (between Fort Columbus and Corinth; and between Florence and Corinth.) Abundant Spring rain and effective Rebel defences (and M & O R.R. repair crews) curtailed railroad track disruption. Although an initial base of operations was sited at Union-friendly Savannah, Tennessee, the intention was to establish the Federal base much further south (between Hamburg and Florence) but the grossly swollen Tennessee River turned those prospective campgrounds into sodden, mosquito-infested marshes; and Pittsburg Landing was selected, by default (selected by Brigadier General William T. Sherman, and approved by General Smith.) The high plateau stretching west of the towering bluff overlooking – and out of reach of – the Tennessee River being the primary feature favouring selection of the site. It is said, “There is nothing more permanent than a temporary solution.” Major General U.S. Grant arrived at Savannah on March 17th 1862 and inspected the de facto campgrounds at Crump’s and Pittsburg established by his predecessor, and pronounced them sound. [Part two] With so many operations on his plate, Major General Henry Halleck did not have manpower or war materials in sufficient quantity to permit combat operations to take place concurrently. Priorities had to be determined from among operations taking place in Northern Missouri (Prentiss), SW Missouri (Curtis), SE Missouri (Pope), Island No.10 (Foote) and Savannah/ Pittsburg (Smith, replaced by Grant.) With North Missouri deemed “under control,” followed by Battle of Pea Ridge securing southern Missouri, manpower and ammunition was freed to be sent elsewhere. (Additional manpower was of no use at Island No.10 so those extra regiments went to General Grant, instead.) And with Henry Halleck’s elevation to Commander, Department of the Mississippi, another source of manpower eventuated: Buell’s Army of the Ohio, based in vicinity of Nashville. But, before U.S. Grant’s operation (with passage of time, confirmed to focus on Corinth) would be permitted to commence, the joint operation (Pope, at New Madrid and Foote, approaching Island No.10 from the north) would be given every opportunity to reach a successful conclusion. And General Grant was ordered, “Do nothing to bring on a general engagement.” References: SDG “Do you know Bragg?” post of 18 May 2018: Confederate Daniel Ruggles assigned to Post of Corinth on 9 March 1862 and begins construction of defences soon after. SDG “Jackson HQ” post of 5 May 2017: General Albert Sidney Johnston arrived at Corinth on March 24th, with concentration of Confederate troops (to this time strewn along the M & C R.R. and the M & O R.R.) gaining pace, and most everyone moves to Corinth. OR 10 (part 2) pages 11 – 12: Henry Halleck has information on March 6th that, “Beauregard has 20,000 men at Corinth.” Sherman reports similar concentration at “Eastport and Corinth” that same day. SDG “Not just pictures…” post of 5 July 2017: Report of Agate (Whitelaw Reid) dateline Savannah Tennessee on 1 April 1862, “There are rumors that General Halleck will take the field here, in person, soon as the Island No.10 agony is over. And there will be four or five corps [marching to Corinth] commanded by Major Generals Grant, Smith, Wallace, Buell and McClernand.”
  37. 1 point
    Mona Your point is correct IRT ample fresh water available at Pittsburg Landing. In addition, water provided "defense," of sorts: swollen Snake Creek and Lick Creek provided impassable barriers, early on... natural moats. And Lew Wallace was likely maintained at Crump's Landing, both to keep him removed from interference with Brigadier General Sherman (as you have previously suggested), and to continue that sizable force at Crump's to act IAW Jomini as "Strategic Reserve" [Art of War pages 128 - 135.] Cheers Ozzy
  38. 1 point
    At the beginning of the 19th Century, Napoleon was seen as "the greatest military leader of recent times," and French was naturally the language to be learned in order to facilitate the study of Napoleon and his strategy and tactics. In the process, French terms for military ranks, units, movements, weaponry, etc were reaffirmed as "the correct terms" for universal understanding (and new French terms were incorporated into American military terminology.) The following link: a publication provided to American soldiers deployed to Europe in 1917 (with attention being directed to French Military Terms on pages 7 - 16.) https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=uc1.$b260555;view=1up;seq=5 French for the Army and Navy (1917). [And for a brief discussion of how French military tactics influenced the course of instruction at West Point: https://www.historynet.com/french-lessons-west-point.htm French Lessons at West Point, initially taught by Francis De Masson from 1803 - 1812 and making certain that military terms such as bastion, glacis and abatis were incorporated, and followed later by empennage, fuselage, nacelle, and aileron (when the airplane entered service.]
  39. 1 point
    Also..Grant was a pretty good artist.
  40. 1 point
    During this "quiet season," here are a few more bits of wit attributed to U. S. Grant: General Grant was asked, "What would you have done with Gideon Pillow if you had captured him at Fort Donelson?" The General pondered, then replied, "Why, I would have turned him loose, of course. It's much better for us to have Pillow in command of Rebels, than tucked away as a prisoner." "What is your favorite music, General?" someone asked Grant. The question caught Ulysses S. Grant (a man who believed "music" was one of the triggers for migraine headache) momentarily off guard. "I have no ear for music," he replied. "In fact, I only know two tunes: one is "Yankee Doodle," and the other isn't." U.S. Grant was the first United States President to play golf... but not very well. During one outing, he is reported to have swung at the ball -- and missed -- more than he made contact. When asked afterwards, "What do you think of golf, General Grant?" the President replied, "Very good exercise," and nodded. "But, I fail to see the purpose of the little ball."
  41. 1 point
    i was referencing Grant titles by Smith,Kaltman and McFeely for help but had to go to grant himself for a couple...Had to answer in bits and pieces in between work..cant believe somebody else didnt jump in and finish before I found the answers.
  42. 1 point
    I wanted to let you know that this evening 1-7-19 @8:30 CST on Mississippi Public Broadcast TV will air an 1983 interview with Mr Foote. Also I heard an interview on radio while driving--Could not write man's name down...but the topic was on mississippi authors in early 1900's. The tale goes that Shelby Foote got into a bit of trouble in school and was suspended a week .His parents sent him to this gentleman's fine home and he then sat him down in his library and told him his punishment was to stay there and read the entire week. ..I didnt know where else to place this topic.
  43. 1 point
    Grant’s Little Jokes For the past year or two, every instance of a joke or funny story attributed to U.S. Grant has been recorded as it was encountered; not as productive a venture as might be supposed, because General Grant projected an image, a presence, of “serious, no-nonsense gravitas.” Grant appeared “too busy to be funny; too seriously engaged to allow humor to color his simply-business, deadly serious professional conduct.” While preparing this discussion paper, the following assertion of Grant’s humor emerged: https://warstoriescast.com/2017/10/24/library-conversation-with-dr-john-marszalek/ Worth a read to get someone else’s take on the subject. Meanwhile, here are jokes and funny stories attributed to Ulysses S. Grant: · “You can’t march through that swamp, Jacob Ammen. I will send transports for you next week [to ferry you across from Hamburg Landing to Hamburg, after you and your men complete a 12-mile march.]” · “There is a water battery. Study it well.” – Said to Surgeon John Brinton during trip up Cumberland River aboard towboat W.H.B. in response to Brinton’s question, “What is a water battery?” And smacks of “Get me a left-handed monkey wrench.” · Allowing Brigadier General William Tecumseh Sherman to persist in calling his force “the First Division,” knowing that conduct would irritate Brigadier General John McClernand, in command of the original First Division. · The initiation and continuance of “the Shell Game” at Pittsburg Landing (claiming General C.F. Smith was still “at Pittsburg Landing,” but “just temporarily absent due to illness” in order to install W.T. Sherman as “acting commander of the campground.”) The joke was at the expense of John McClernand… again. · “General Grant intends to give you the opportunity to be shot in every important move” – Grant to Lew Wallace, via aide William Hillyer, following the success (at the cost of Wallace disregarding orders) at Fort Donelson. · In Missouri in 1861, General Grant advanced his troops and in process, heard about a local woman, Mrs. Selvidge, renowned for her home cooking. But when Grant fronted up to the cook’s home, he was told by her that, “She could not prepare a meal for the General because a squad of his cavalry had visited earlier, and cleaned her out – ate everything she had, except for a pie.” The General had a look at the pie, handed Mrs. Selvidge fifty cents, and turned to depart. “Aren’t you going to take your pie?” asked the cook. “Oh, no. Hold onto it for me.” And General Grant mounted his horse and took his departure. At his new headquarters, Grant determined the identity of the cavalry unit, and sent its commander the following order, just before midnight: “Having visited Mrs. Selvidge and eaten almost everything she had, except for one pie, you will depart immediately for Mrs. Selvidge’s and eat that pie, too.” · After enjoying success at Fort Donelson, Grant “knew” that the next logical step was occupation of Nashville. And he was disheartened by delay and procrastination, most revealed by Brigadier General Don Carlos Buell, who asserted, “The Rebels may have departed, but they have every intention of returning to Nashville” – a claim that newly minted Major General Grant did not believe. But, in “showing his acceptance of Buell’s claim,” Grant pressed upon Buell the offer of BGen C.F. Smith’s division, in order to secure Union possession of Nashville… and he had Buell put that request in writing… and then sent Smith from Clarksville to Nashville. Rbn3 in a post of 3 MAR 2017 offers the following: “Undistinguished and often shabby in appearance, Ulysses S. Grant did not recommend himself to strangers by looks. He once entered the Desoto House at Galena, Illinois, on a stormy winter's night. A number of lawyers, in town for a court session, were clustered around the fire. One looked up as Grant appeared and said, "Here's a stranger, gentlemen, and by the looks of him he's travelled through hell itself to get here." "That's right," said Grant cheerfully. "And how did you find things down there?" "Just like here," replied Grant, "lawyers all closest to the fire."
  44. 1 point
    5...Julia...after she saw this picture she didnt like the "two storied" beard appearance and also disapproved of his hat..that even to me ..seems a size or two too same.
  45. 1 point
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  48. 1 point
    #7---False..yes Grant did suffer with terrible migranes but alcohol was never used. He opted for mustard plasters and treatment like this.The migrane attacks did render him down and out which may have fulled the talk of drinking to point of passing out..but it was the migranes that laid him out.Also ,he contracted malaria in 1852 while in Isthmus of Panama and this condition also puts one to bed and even after"recovery" flare ups do return.So either medical condition or both arising at the same time would really prostrate him to sick bed.
  49. 1 point
    have you read where Grant did not have his time piece with him.I read this a few days ago.
  50. 1 point
    Upon reading the posts at SDG, it is evident that Confederate Cavalry officer, Basil Duke, is a favourite of many. A veteran of the Battle of Shiloh, who afterwards became involved with the progress of Shiloh Memorial Park (which eventually became Shiloh NMP), and who was often invited as Speaker at Dedication events... But, unknown to most, is that prior to the Civil War, Basil Duke was a base ball player. Born in Kentucky in 1838, Basil Duke took his Law degree earned at Transylvania College west and settled in St. Louis, where he joined his cousin's law firm and became involved in militia activities and base ball. A member of the Cyclones in time for the 1860 season, he played against other St. Louis clubs named Morning Stars, Unions, Tigers, Excelsiors, Independents and Empires, on fields around the city, recorded as Lafayette Park, Laclede Ground, Commercial Ground, Gamble Lawn Ground, and "the field immediately west of the Fair Grounds." In 1861, Basil Duke missed the March opening of the Season (away with "other activities") and as far as is known, never played for the Cyclones again. During 1861, the young man returned to Kentucky and signed on with another cousin: John Hunt Morgan. Base ball (spelled as two words) continued in St. Louis during the War (but often involved the club's "second nine," with their First Nine being otherwise engaged.) References: http://www.matrixgames.com/forums/printable.asp?m=1836953 Basil Duke and the St. Louis Cyclones http://thisgameofgames.com/home/category/basil-duke/ Jeffery Kittel's excellent Civil War baseball site (with focus on St. Louis) http://digital.shsmo.org/cdm/compoundobject/collection/dmr/id/17105/rec/5 Missouri Daily Republican of 5 June 1863 with box score for Game played at the Commercial Ground between the Baltics and the Independents (won by Baltics 33 - 14) recorded page 3 Col. 5 (bottom). http://digital.shsmo.org/cdm/compoundobject/collection/dmr/id/11906/rec/19 Missouri Daily Republican of 9 July 1860 page 2, Col.10 announcing Game to be played that afternoon at 4 p.m. between the Cyclones and Morning Stars.
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