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Showing content with the highest reputation on 08/04/2020 in all areas

  1. 1 point
    Fifty years after the end of the Civil War, an astute author realized that the men who had made History, and their stories were in imminent danger of being lost forever. So, Mamie Yeary set out across Texas (and had manuscripts sent her) to record as many “average Johnnies” as possible. Their stories, brief and poignant, leave the reader “wishing for more” …which may be possible, because many kept diaries; and almost all wrote letters during the war. And, with a name (and combat unit designation) we now have a starting point… especially for the scores of Confederate Shiloh veterans who made these pages: https://archive.org/details/reminiscencesofbv1year/page/1 Reminiscences of the Boys in Gray (1912) by Mamie Yeary. https://archive.org/details/reminiscencesofb00year/page/n5 Reminiscences (Vol.2) [See pages 428 - 9 William Lee 6th Arkansas; pp.515 - 7 John Middleton 23rd Tennessee, for examples of what is available by searching for "Shiloh." Also, pp. 884 - 890 lists almost every skirmish and battle in Tennessee (and surrounding pages list almost every skirmish, action and battle in every State during the 1861 - 1865 War.)]
  2. 1 point
    Thanks for the above information, especially about Baylor: been collecting as many details of Albert Sidney Johnston's Staff as possible http://shilohdiscussiongroup.com/topic/1901-albert-sidney-johnstons-staff/?tab=comments#comment-14303 primarily because of the Beauregard vs. Jefferson Davis feud, and the role of General Johnston's staff in white-anting General Beauregard, helping facilitate his removal from command in June 1862. [One particularly fascinating character is Dudley Haydon (sometimes spelled Hayden) of Kentucky. He hand-delivered material to President Davis at Richmond after attending General Johnston's funeral in New Orleans that contradicted General Beauregard's Shiloh Battle Report. But after arriving at Richmond early May 1862, he disappears from the record until years after the war, back in Kentucky.]
  3. 1 point
    The old link appears to be disabled; this is the new link: http://www.lib.uiowa.edu/spec-coll/msc/ToMsC950/MsC906/CivilWarCollection.html [Scroll down 1/4 page.] “Sunday, April 6th. It has been a pleasant day so far as weather is concerned but extremely unpleasant on account of the shell, shot, and bullets flying so profusely. The rebels attacked our advance about six o’clock A.M. Our regiment was not called out until about ½ past 7 oclock. We formed in line of battle soon after leaving our camp and met the enemy (who had driven our advance divisions back) about ¾ of a mile from our camp. The battle was tremendious and we were under continual fire till dark. The secesh flanked us and caused us to fall back and finally drove us back nearly to the river, but we checked them by well aimed shots from our gun boats and siege guns on the hill above the landing. Firing closed about dark and we lay on our arms all night in a drenching rain. Buell reinforced us during the night. “Monday, April 7th. Buell took the advance this morning and at early dawn the ball opened again with fresh vigor on our side for our boys were determined to drive them over the ground we lost yesterday. Cheered on by reinforcements the old troops took fresh vigor and by four P.M. they were entirely routed and made a hasty retreat leaving us in possession of the field and many of their cannon. The field is covered all over with killed and wounded. I look over a portion of the field and Oh, the suffering to be seen. I went back to the old camp and am in my own tent once more safe but it looks lonesome for many of our boys are not here and we know not what has become of them. It has been rainy all day and rains very hard tonight." [Above two diary entries found at University of Iowa Libraries. Private Turner Bailey (school teacher before the War) assisted General Prentiss with the rest of the Third Iowa until just before the position collapsed. Some of the Third Iowa (Major Stone and Captain O'Neill, along with perhaps thirty other members) were taken prisoner. Bailey made it to Grant's Last Line.]
  4. 1 point
    The primary source for prisoner identification of John Hunt Morgan at Corinth on 7 April 1862 is 1st Lieutenant Joseph B. Dorr, QM for the 12th Iowa Infantry who was captured with most of the rest of his regiment at Hell's Hollow about 5:30 p.m. on April 6th. Dorr had been a newspaperman with Dubuque Herald before the war, and indicates in his diary: "I saw and conversed with the celebrated Captain John Morgan [on Monday afternoon]. He was pointed out to me by a young man in the crowd... He talked with several prisoners, but my informant said he did not wish to have us know him." [Found on pages 96 - 97 of A Perfect Picture of Hell (2001) edited by Genoways & Genoways; University of Iowa Press.]
  5. 1 point
    Do you have the sources handy? It would explain why Duke is so quiet about April 7.
  6. 1 point
    Looking through it today I found two nuggets in volume 1. On page 45 you get a short account by Baylor. It is blunt, including a defense of slavery. He mentions getting shot in the nose while on Johnston's staff. The best though is by a member of Morgan's squadron on page 259-261. It is very detailed. It places Morgan at Sarah Bell Field before shifting over to the right. Apparently Morgan acted as escort for Breckinridge before 2:00 p.m.
  7. 1 point
    That makes sense, as the 46th Ohio pretty much disintegrated after the afternoon fight in Crescent Field. I do have an update... In volume of Reminiscences of the Boys in Gray, page 764, a veteran of the 17th Alabama mentions guarding prisoners on April 7. Jackson in his report (555) says the regiment fell back to its starting line, but he saw it later. Seems the regiment was a cross purposes on April 7, hence its absence most of the day.
  8. 1 point
    As for Colonel Worthington's 46th Ohio: that officer had a “personality clash” with fellow Ohian William T. Sherman. And Worthington ultimately was subjected to Court Martial AUG 1862. I would not be surprised that Worthington submitted a report... that was never submitted by General Sherman (or which was presented at the Court Martial, and suppressed, by being included in the Court Martial file.) Also, Sherman wrote his official Shiloh report extremely quickly; finished it before Halleck arrived 11 April 1862, despite being actively engaged in the field thru 8 April. But, as regards the 46th Ohio: After the war, Colonel Thomas Worthington was able to provide a detailed account of Shiloh due to the fact he kept a detailed diary. See https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=hvd.hx4u5n&view=1up&seq=40 "History of 46th OVI" by Col. T. Worthington. Worthington indicates on 39th page of above work [marked as 11] that at 3 p.m. on 6 April he was ordered to deliver a report to General Grant, and found him at dinner aboard the Tigress. On the 40th page [marked as 12] Colonel Worthington indicates he was back at the Landing 5 p.m. and was ordered by General Grant to “return to the battle-line, and keep the troops well up in front.” There is no report from Worthington concerning location or action of 46th Ohio on Day Two; and McDowell's report indicates “fragments of regiments assigned to his brigade joined other commands on Day Two (April 7).” Atwell Thompson's 1900 map does not indicate location of the 46th Ohio on Day Two. None of the 46th Ohio killed, wounded or captured at Shiloh are indicated as anything besides “6 April 1862” in Adjutant General records for Ohio: https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=uiug.30112047586000&view=1up&seq=366&size=125 Other Thomas Worthington references: https://onlinebooks.library.upenn.edu/webbin/book/lookupname?key=Worthington%2C Thomas%2C 1807-1884 The definite location of 46th OVI on Day Two remains undetermined. Likely locations: company-sized groups served in support of other regiments; shirkers hiding at Pittsburg Landing; battalion-sized unit acting as support for artillery on Grant's Last Line...
  9. 1 point
    Below I have shared the Diary of Samuel K. Cox, a young lieutenant in the 17th Kentucky Infantry, while the regiment was at Pittsburg Landing. Cox and the 17th fought at Fort Donelson, and so, were some of the veteran troops Grant had at Shiloh. He offers key details that are corroborated by other accounts, which helps understand the complex movements of Lauman's brigade on April 6th and 7th, 1862. The combined 17th/25th Kentucky Infantry regiments are the only Kentucky regiments that fought both days for the Union, as the rest were marching with Buell's army. The 17th was from my town, so I have loved diving into what Lt. Cox says he experienced. His Fort Donelson entries are also very interesting and I will post those some day soon! Lauman's brigade was the 3rd Brigade in Hurlbut's division, so they were encamped by the "information shelter" on the Mounds and the parking lot adjacent to that. Their first line was facing west on the edge of Larkin Bell's Cotton Field, and they then moved back to the fence near the house and Peach Orchard, and then just north and east of Bloody Pond where they made a 5 hour stand before falling back toward the siege guns. I really wish there was more on these guys!29 MarchThis is again Sunday. How time flies by. We had Sunday inspection. I received some cigars and tobacco today, sent me from home, and also received a letter from Sister Jennie which I answered immediately.We had new jackets issued today. 5 AprilLast night about 7 o'clock, we heard for the first time the "long roll" and our boys immediately responding to the call and were formed in line in ten minutes. We were then informed that our lines had been attacked some two miles from here, to which point we marched immediately. We did not reach the scene of action as it was only a skirmish and lasted only a few minutes. We then returned to camp and slept one more night in peace. 6 AprilWe have heard today that the enemy intended to attack us at this point. How true the report is we will soon know. We were brushing up for Sunday morning inspection when, to our very great surprise, the cannon and small arms opened not a mile distant and in ten minutes that everlasting long roll was beaten and we gathered our guns and formed in line. In a few minutes we were seen winding our way to the point from whence the music of musketry came.We arrived there in a few moments, and found our forces falling back gradually. Our Brigade, consisting of the 17th Kentucky, 44th Indiana, 31st Indiana regiments were formed in line of battle close to the edge of a field. We had been there but a few moments when the enemy opened a "G" and wounded several. While this was going on, a continual roar of musketry both on our right and left proved the battle was raging at every point. In a few moments, the enemy attacked the 31st and 44th Indiana, which was on our right. We could easily see the fight, it being but a few rods away, but not close enough for us to participate. We had to wait but a short time, however, as they appeared in front of us in the field spoken of above. Our order was not to fire until the command was given, which was obeyed almost to the letter. They had probably gotten halfway across, when General Hurlbut gave the command, "Now, boys, give it to them." Our regiment opened and "Great God!" I never saw men lie down faster when not skirmishing than they did. It seemed to me that the whole line fell. Every man in forty yards of the flag was either killed or wounded. The flag bearer, however, walked coolly across the field waving his color. He excited the admiration of all for bravery and coolness. I suppose he had at least five hundred shots fired at him, but Providence seemed to be on his side as no person touched him. At this point, we had one or two of Company A wounded. One ball struck Captain Morton squarely in the breast, but being a spend ball, it did no damage. We remained at that place some two hours and the Brigade which was fight on our left, from some cause or other, gave way and we had to leave our position which we had so nobly held to hold them in check at that point.Soon arriving on the ground, the enemy made its appearance and a most desperate struggle ensued. For five long, weary hours, did we stand under a terrific fire both from musketry and shell. We advanced inch by inch on the enemy and man a poor soldier "bit the dust" trying to maintain his position. We gained on them gradually until nearly every cartridge in the regiment had been sent on his mission of death, when we were outflanked by ten times our number and compelled to fall back, which was done, thank God, in good order. At this point, a few minutes before our ammunition gave out, our gallant Captain Morton fell, mortally wounded. I was close by his side and took him on my back and started for the landing which was a mile distant. By the time I had arrived, the Regiment had taken a position behind some heavy siege guns, which had been mounted as a last resort to hold Pittsburg Landing. In a very short time, they were belching forth their missiles of death which held the enemy in check until night closed and put a stop to the butchering of human lives.I have no idea of the number killed and wounded but know the loss was heavy on both sides. I was of the opinion that we would never see a harder fight that we had at Donelson, but that was nothing in comparison to this. There has been one continual roar of musketry and big guns ever since the commencement this morning. I will now quit and hope for the best. General Buell's forces are now crossing the river by the thousands so we may expect war times tomorrow morning.7 AprilLast night it rained all night and the men were compelled to lie down on the cold, wet earth while they enemy had possession of our camps and were sleeping comfortably. Our boys, being very tired and hungry, went to sleep, notwithstanding the rain, which was descending in torrents. They lay anxiously awaiting the return of daylight so that they might know the result. At last it came. The rain, however, had held up and directly after day light, General Buell's forces opened the fight. They crossed all night; soon afterwards, General Grant's command went in. The firing was tremendous, I believe equal to yesterday, although the artillery was not so heavy. Our brigade, at least the remainder, was ordered on the right a distance of three miles where we arrived and soon were engaged. We fought at this point until about four o'clock in the afternoon when the enemy gave way, and soon afterwards was in full retreat toward Corinth. Our soldiers sent up cheer after cheer.I firmly believe that General Hurlbut's Division saved the day on yesterday and gained it today. They outflanked the enemy which caused them to retreat in great disorder. Our troops were too much exhausted to follow up their retreat and consequently, did not capture a great many prisoners.After the battle closed, I took a stroll over the field. It was horrible. The men were thick, some wounded and some in the cold arms of death. I could tell from the dead where the battle had raged more fiercely. Federal and Confederate soldiers were lying in the agonies of death.8 AprilWe area again in camp, but how changed the scene! Only two days ago we were in high spirits and confident of getting home soon without any more hard fighting; but alas, we were mistaken and many brave man in that short time has found a grave in the soil of Tennessee. Among the killed is our brave and kind Captain Morton. He died that night at 9:30 PM. It is useless for me to undertake to do him justice for I cannot. My pen is inadequate to the task. He was, however, a brave, cool man, always at his post and more especially when danger was high. He fell while leading his company gallantly on to battle. He was kind to his men and they all loved him and were willing to obey his command. They stood by him like heroes during the day when he fell. They seemed to fight more desperately to avenge his death. I cannot force his words to me when he fell. He put his arm around my neck and said, "Well, Sam, they have killed me at last." I immediately took him on my back and carried him through a perfect shower of cannon balls. I was determined to take him from the field or perish in the attempt, and, had the enemy overtaken me, I was resolved to remain a prisoner with him. But kind Providence seemed to favor me, and I arrived at the Landing where I had his wound dressed and immediately moved him on a steamer which was at the Landing. He talked to me freely on the road and told me what disposition he wanted to make of his property. He also remarked that "Many a better man had fallen that day." I told him that a better man never lived, and I am sure there was never a better man.This regiment has lost its brightest ornament, and one, too, that can never be replaced. His remains started home today in charge of his faithful servant, Horace. He will be buried in the church yard of the village of Hartford, Kentucky, his home. There, he will repose amid the scenes of his early labors and triumphs, away from the busy hum of life far away from the thunder and conflict and not clarion note will ever more disturb his slumbers or call him forth to battle. Peace to his ashes, and may the undying laurel of glory grow green over his grave.
  10. 1 point
    Wheelbarrow... an interesting read. And it puts me in mind of something that emerges from the study of the Battle of Shiloh: so many of the "survivors" of that Battle appear to have been "altered" (but not in the way one would expect). The experience sharpened the drive of many to "do better, and be better." In many cases, the quest for excellence became extraordinary: Ambrose Bierce. Would he have become the outstanding writer, whose works still find popularity today, without his exposure to "the Elephant?" John Wesley Powell. An artillery officer who lost an arm at Shiloh; and after the War, explored the American West more skillfully than could most men with two arms. Seymour Thompson. Honed his perception of right and wrong -- and what was "justice" -- and became a noted judge. Lew Wallace. Questioning and contemplating his own role at Shiloh (and his other war experiences), and how they related to the "Grand Scheme" led him to write Ben Hur. Then, there are the politicians: at least four Shiloh survivors aspired to become President (two succeeded.) But there were countless others who entered politics at lower levels; most -- I would imagine -- wanted to "change things for the better" ...much like Matthew Mark Trumbull. Ozzy
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