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  1. 1 point
    I think the burden of proof, in this case, would be on the one making the supposition. Not the one disagreeing. Otherwise, it is character assassination by conspiracy theory.
  2. 1 point
    Okay folks, we have our subjects set for our Epic Trek with historian Tim Smith on November 2nd. This year we're returning to our original format of examining two different subjects rather than just one, and I hope you agree that they're good choices. More details will be posted soon, but here's an overview for now: Our morning hike will focus on Union General Benjamin Prentiss and his controversial role in the battle and its aftermath. Did Prentiss save Grant's army, as we often hear, or is there more to the story? And was he responsible for alerting the Union army to the danger that morning, or was he, like Sherman and Grant, taken by surprise when the attack hit? We'll delve into these issues, and visit several sites around the battlefield associated with Prentiss, including his defensive position in the legendary Hornets Nest. (We may also have a chance to recreate a late 19th Century photograph that included the General.) After a break for lunch, our afternoon hike will be a subject suggested by SDG member Jim Franklin - we'll follow the Confederate approach to Grants Last Line, examining the challenges they faced and discussing the controversy that erupted after the battle over this aborted attack. Did Beauregard make the right call here, or should the Confederates have continued the attack? See the terrain in person and decide for yourself. A big thank you to Jim for the excellent idea! Again, more details will be posted soon. I'm already looking forward to the hikes, and seeing some familiar faces and hopefully some new ones as well. As always, feel free to post any questions you might have. Perry
  3. 1 point
    Very happy to hear you all had a wonderful trip!
  4. 1 point
    A small blog post today about my first trip to Shiloh. Shamed of myself that I had never been to this iconic and bucolic location previously! Shiloh!
  5. 1 point
    We all wound up getting a tick or two, but the Deep Woods Off pretty much took care of most and we only had to flick a couple away.
  6. 1 point
    glad you had a great visit...yes the food here is hit or miss...you will have to return! hope yall did a good tick check!
  7. 1 point
    A number of Historians have attempted, over the years, to define the Civil War partnership of U.S. Grant and William Tecumseh Sherman; and identify "what it was that made that partnership successful." General Oliver O. Howard, USMA Class of 1854, came to know the two leaders after he was transferred to the West following his participation at Gettysburg; he first made their acquaintance during the Campaign for Chattanooga in October 1863. This is General Howard's observation: References: http://penelope.uchicago.edu/Thayer/E/Gazetteer/Places/America/United_States/Army/USMA/Cullums_Register/1634*.html General O.O. Howard bio https://archive.org/details/autobiographyofo01inhowa/page/n7 Autobiography of General Oliver O. Howard (pages 474 - 475).
  8. 1 point
    From the Civilwarwisconsin web site: http://civilwarwisconsin.com/campfire-stories.html?start=45 After the evacuation of Corinth, Pittsburg Landing continued to be our base of supplies and commissary stores were wagoned from there to the various places where our troops were stationed. And it happened, while the regiment was at Bethel, that I was one of a party of about a hundred men detailed to serve as guards for a wagon train destined for the Landing and return to Bethel with army rations. There was at the Landing at this time, serving as guards for the government stores, a regiment of infantry. There were only a few of them visible, and they looked pale and emaciated, and much like dead men on their feet. I asked one of them what regiment was stationed there and he told me it was the 14th Wisconsin Infantry. This was the one I had seen at Benton Barracks and admired so much on account of the splendid appearance of the men. I mentioned this to the soldier, and expressed to him my surprise to now see them in such bad shape. He went on to tell me that the men suffered fearfully from the change of climate, the water, and their altered conditions in general that they had nearly all been prostrated by camp diarrhea and at that time there were not more than a hundred men in the regiment fit for duty, and even those were not much better that shadows of their former selves. And judging from the few men that were visible, the soldier told the plain, unvarnished truth. Our regiment and the 14th Wisconsin soon drifted apart, and I never saw it again. But as a matter of history, I will say that it made a excellent and distinguished record during the war. Leander stillwell 61st Illinois Infantry Jim
  9. 1 point
    Following the Battle of Shiloh, and the service of the 14th Wisconsin with Buell's Army of the Ohio on Day Two, the 14th Wisconsin Infantry was tasked with provost marshal duties, and remained at Pittsburg Landing while Henry Halleck led his Army of the Mississippi south towards Corinth. After the Occupation of Corinth end of May 1862, and the pursuit by Major General Pope of Beauregard's Army withdrawing to the south, the 14th Wisconsin helped process the thousands of Confederate prisoners sent north by Pope for transport to Northern POW camps. In addition, the men of the 14th Wisconsin were among the first to learn that "Major General Pope estimated the remaining Rebel Army under Beauregard to number only 30,000 men." [This figure was wildly inaccurate, and led leaders in Washington, and General Halleck, to believe the Rebel Army in the West was disintegrating before their very eyes. And this "Success" led to Pope and Halleck being called East for "Important duties in Washington." ] Reported in OR 10 part one and two, the above details are further verified by letters written by Private James K. Newton, 14th Wisconsin, Company F and Private Newton's letters are contained in A Wisconsin Boy in Dixie: Civil War Letters of James K. Newton (first published 1961 and edited by Stephen Ambrose.) James Newton's letters detail involvement of the 14th Wisconsin at Shiloh; the two months of provost duty at Pittsburg Landing; and involvement with the Vicksburg Campaign. References: https://ir.uiowa.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?referer=https://www.google.com.au/&httpsredir=1&article=11025&context=annals-of-iowa https://books.google.com.au/books?id=Rihx0ZU10RoC&pg=PA185&lpg=PA185&dq=abraham+john+logan+vicksburg+mine&source=bl&ots=lvFv9lctsX&sig=ACfU3U33shApGD5jy43VOTylDhzazIctag&hl=en&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwi896Cqt_LhAhWKWX0KHS_5B384ChDoATAAegQIBxAB#v=onepage&q=Savannah&f=false A Wisconsin Boy in Dixie (limited access at Google Books)
  10. 1 point
    Yes Ozzy..I have not read this prior...You always come up with great reads..but I do have to correct this article a little...Morgan's favorite mount was a black mare..Black Bess. Thank you for the birthday present!! Mona
  11. 1 point
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