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Shiloh Discussion Group

Stan Hutson

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Everything posted by Stan Hutson

  1. Then again, I don't know how much that time mattered. The Confederates were disorganized, thus part of the reason they stopped. Had they continued on the attack, being so disorganized, I venture that the disorganization would have caused even more ill coordinated attacks, and potentially, disaster for the Confederates, if that makes sense.
  2. I would say the time from when CS troops stopped in the Federal camps until the attacks resumed, esp. on the Confederate center and right.
  3. From the album: Federals killed, wounded, or captured at Shiloh; and some who died in the greater Shiloh campaign before and after the battle; along with notable figures at Shiloh

    Sgt. William Andrew Lorimer, Company I, 17th Illinois Infantry. Lorimer enlisted as a 20 year old Sergeant in Peoria, Illinois on 25 April 1861. He was slightly wounded at Fort Donelson on 13 February 1862. He was again wounded at Shiloh, wounded in both legs, on 7 April 1862. He was promoted to Captain in 1863 and mustered out in 1864.
  4. Not sure what "Colonel" he killed, or if that was reported in error.
  5. From the album: Shiloh; Photographs at Shiloh and relics of the battle

    Chaplain I. T. Tichenor, 17th Alabama Infantry. Though a Chaplain, he carried a Colt Revolving rifle at Shiloh, and used it. His records with the Alabama Civil War Soldiers database state that he "Distinguished himself at Shiloh for gallantry. Killed one Colonel, a Captain and four privates with his fine rifle." Tichenor wrote of his Shiloh experiences for his family; the attached is a portion of what he wrote. He plundered through the chest belonging to Col. Benjamin Allen of the 16th Wisconsin Infantry, finding $20 in gold in Allen's belongings. Tichenor witnessed the wounding and capture of Lt. Col. William Swarthout of the 50th Illinois Infantry.
  6. From the album: Federals killed, wounded, or captured at Shiloh; and some who died in the greater Shiloh campaign before and after the battle; along with notable figures at Shiloh

    Lt. Col. William Swarthout, 50th Illinois Infantry. Swarthout was wounded and captured at Shiloh. Chaplain I. T. Tichenor of the 17th Alabama Infantry related the story of Swarthout being wounded and captured. Col. Moses Bane ordered Swarthout and Sgt. Maj. Hughes to scout ahead of the regiment. Tichenor relates: "Before long 2 men, one on foot and one on horseback started directly towards us. They evidently proposed to obtain definite information as to whether we were friends or foes." The word was passed to not allow these 2 men to escape. The Alabamians actually talked to Swarthout and Hughes telling them to surrender. As they turned to run, the 17th fired on them. Sgt. Maj. Hughes on horseback was shot down, and Swarthout took cover behind a tree, drew his pistol, and started firing. A member of the 17th Alabama worked his way around the tree. He fired a shot, which missed Swarthout. The 2nd shot hit Swarthout, at which point he cried "I surrender!". He was taken prisoner. Swarthout resigned on 27 March 1863.
  7. From the album: Federals killed, wounded, or captured at Shiloh; and some who died in the greater Shiloh campaign before and after the battle; along with notable figures at Shiloh

    Sgt. John Dunn, Company C, 41st Ohio Infantry. Listed as the Color Sergeant in the regimental history. He was mortally wounded at Shiloh on 7 April 1862 and died due to those wounds on 13 April 1862. He is buried in New Albany, Indiana.
  8. From the album: Federals killed, wounded, or captured at Shiloh; and some who died in the greater Shiloh campaign before and after the battle; along with notable figures at Shiloh

    1st Sgt. Irenus McGowan, Company A, 29th Indiana Infantry. Wounded at Shiloh on 7 April 1862 when a bullet smashed the middle knuckle of his left forefinger and another bullet inflected a flesh wound to his leg. He had this to say of the battle: “When within twenty or twenty-live miles of Shiloh we heard the guns on the first day. All extra baggage was thrown one side and we went forward in light marching order... In the morning we were put on board the vessels and moved up toward Pittsburg Landing. We reached the field of battle on the 7th.... That was the first experience the company had in battle and it suffered severely, twenty-three men being killed or wounded. I was struck twice, once in the hand and once in the leg. I was quite glad to see the rebels disappear.... On the battlefield of Shiloh, I received my commission as Second Lieutenant. The recollection of those days following the battle is very vivid. I witnessed then for the first time all the horrors of the battle-field, mangled bodies of horses and men and broken caissons.” Neither wound was serious, although his hand was probably the worst of his two injuries. By the middle of May Irenus wrote home, "My hand is nearly well so that I can use it some."
  9. I am a firm believer that there are some "jewels" out there, letters and diaries and such, about Shiloh, that the public has never seen.
  10. As noted in the piece above, it says he was killed on the 7th, while his military records clearly state he was killed on the 6th.
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