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Shiloh Discussion Group

Stan Hutson

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Posts posted by Stan Hutson


  1. On 3/15/2018 at 1:11 PM, mona said:

    is that nashville pike or wilkerson rd  behind him?? im trying to figure out where he's at??is this where the pile of dirt came from? i can see a snake fence in the back.looks like an old home place by the big cedars along the lane...also one more reason to come..it will just get more and more dangerous to even drive and try to find these locations..

    Wilkinson.  Yes, where he is standing is now the building.  The pile of dirt is to the back left of the cameraman.


  2. On 3/13/2018 at 3:13 PM, mona said:

    ive tried to reply to this many times and it wont load so im going this way...yall  if you even have a slight desire to visit stones river nmp  do so asap...it is disappearing before one's eye. Stan does an exceptional guided tour and really helps you "see" the battlefield/action despite all the development..it is dicey in some spots to pull over and look over the grounds..but you will not get out.. it is a forever lost...yall can read/study upon this battle and get out there and if you dont have Stan...you will be lost and confused...i thank you forever stan for the guided tour...there i absolutely no interpretation of the battle...and locations about...i think mufreesboro really missed an tremedous opportunity for the tourism dollars by allowing this to happen instead the want roads condos hotels,strip malls,homes(which i hope have ghosts),counrty club. dollars.we are SO fortunate to have our Shiloh!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Mona,

    You remember the pile of dirt (the same one I found the relics in).  Where the guy is standing in this video is now gone.  A building has gone up there just since last September.  Good video.  The area where he is standing, up to the road behind him, totally unrecognizable now.

     

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=feDY1Qp6ZI4


  3. On 3/13/2018 at 3:13 PM, mona said:

    ive tried to reply to this many times and it wont load so im going this way...yall  if you even have a slight desire to visit stones river nmp  do so asap...it is disappearing before one's eye. Stan does an exceptional guided tour and really helps you "see" the battlefield/action despite all the development..it is dicey in some spots to pull over and look over the grounds..but you will not get out.. it is a forever lost...yall can read/study upon this battle and get out there and if you dont have Stan...you will be lost and confused...i thank you forever stan for the guided tour...there i absolutely no interpretation of the battle...and locations about...i think mufreesboro really missed an tremedous opportunity for the tourism dollars by allowing this to happen instead the want roads condos hotels,strip malls,homes(which i hope have ghosts),counrty club. dollars.we are SO fortunate to have our Shiloh!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Thanks for the kind words Mona.  But, you are right, if anyone wants to see it before it is totally gone, you have less than 2 years.  After that, the last few remnants of where most of the battle was fought, beyond the park boundaries, will be gone for good.  At that point, well, trying to really pin down where fighting took place, good luck with that.  But, yep, liberally I give it about 5 years, and that is it, what is left will be gone forever.


  4. If you notice, this image is the same one I use for my profile picture.  I bought this image of Jenkins 10 years ago.  The "partially" unknown woman is simply named "Elizabeth", not sure who she is.  And the hair is attached to period red cloth, not sure if it was part of a flag or what.

    jenkins2.jpg

    • Like 1

  5. And here is another, Johnny Green mentions Pvt. Daniel Jenkins, Company B, 9th Kentucky Infantry CS, stating on page 36 of his book, "a few minutes afterwards Daniel Jenkins and Sylvester Smith offered up the same sacrifice for our country."

     

     

    pic -Jenkins003.jpg


  6. All,

    I posted this image in my Shiloh album, but thought it deserved its own post.  It is a neat, and I dare say rare thing to come across images where an account during the battle is associated with that person.  Here is one.

    Cpt. Price Newman, 9th Kentucky Infantry CS

    Johnny Green of the Orphan Brigade stated,

    "One yankee who stood his ground firing from behind one of their tents had drawn a bead on Captain Price Newman who was in hot pursuit at the head of his company.  I fired at Mr. Yank as I advanced, but missed him; he fired at Capt Newman not fifteen feet distant, who fell headlong."

    It appears, as fate would have it, the captain had caught his foot on a tent rope and stumbled right as the Federal soldier fired.  Newman stood up and shot the Federal with his pistol.

    large.5a9dcb074ea50_CaptainPriceCNewman2.jpg.824a864befbbe1a75924ca3ced114a83.jpg

    • Like 2

  7. On 5/18/2011 at 7:48 PM, larrytagg said:

    Thanks again, Ron, good stuff. I've turned up a few things, too, googling Murray's name.  He was evidently a judge from Gainesboro, Tennessee, before the war, and given a regiment by Governor Harris.  He was elected to the Confederate Congress from the Jackson County district after he was not re-elected colonel by the regiment in May 1862.

    There's also a diary of a Spencer Talley of the 28th Tennessee online, and he gives a very general description of the regiment at Shiloh.  It's hard to tell what they did there, or who was in charge, although they must have done some fighting, because he mentions casualties.

    I haven't looked at Statham's Shiloh report in the O.R. yet (if there is one).  I'll check there tonight. 

    Larry

    Cpt. John Holman, left, and Lt. Spencer Talley, 28th Tennessee Infantry

    John Holman & S. Talley.jpg

    • Like 1

  8. 4 hours ago, mona said:

    it would intersting to take Mike"s photos and do a "then and now"series...

    Yes it would.  The picture Mike posted.  The field on the upper left is now gone.  Mike's picture actually doesn't do the area justice, but in a bad way.  It looks "green", when in actuality most of the area is gone.  To the left in Mike's picture is the bank, where the Harding house stood, and where General Sill was killed.

    • Like 1

  9. I tell you.  I am sure most of you know Paul aka Dude that has worked as a seasonal ranger at Shiloh for years.  Almost every day after work he goes walking/hiking around the battlefield.  He is a local boy and he knows the land.  Some of his observations about the terrain and how the terrain has changed leave you with raised eyebrows, like, wow, that is a solidly legit point.  

    It would be a great thing to have Dude give a hike and show you what he has seen and what he thinks.  

    • Like 1

  10. One last clarification.  Where the Mississippi button was found, as far as I can tell, only 2 Mississippi units were in that area.  But, where the button was found, versus how the maps show troop movements including those Mississippians, to myself and some others it seems to be off by at least a brigade battle line front.

    • Like 1

  11. I forgot to add, last year I was able to show Mike Talplacido around.  He was able to take pictures of some spots, that, even since then, are now bulldozed.  I reckon he preserved history without knowing it, as some of the pictures he took are no doubt the last photos ever taken of a "this is what it looked like" nature.

    • Like 1

  12. All,

    I know this is a Shiloh board, but, a little "after action report".  Mona was in my neck of the woods here at Stones River and I was able to give her a tour of the battlefield.  A little insert here, if anyone is ever in the area and wants a tour, let me know and I will be glad to show you around.

    I guess this is also a, "Shiloh is lucky" moment.  I was not happy to report to Mona, well, telling her, "don't get too excited, this ain't Shiloh".  Tragically, in the 1890's there was a desire to create a National Military Park at Stones River almost as large as Shiloh.  The move would have created a park of roughly 3,100 acres.  Today, I think we roughly have 700 acres.  Size wise, what the park has today is roughly, for a Shiloh comparison, Grant's last line, extending out to Cloud Field and over to the main battlefield entrance today.  

    Similar to Shiloh, we had to drive through the battlefield to get to the area where the battle started.  Stones River battlefield, is, well, it is gone.  I lived in Murfreesboro 17 years ago, and since that time this battlefield has been paved over.  When I say paved over, Stones Rivers' versions of the Peach Orchard, Rea Field, Fraley Field, Duncan Field, Jones Field, the Hornet's Nest, where most of the major fighting took place, is no more.  I-24 goes through the heart of that area now.  Cleburne's men attacked where Interstate 24 now exists.  To the east of 24, it is now Walmart, an expanding hospital, hotels, places to eat, you get the picture.  Even the last few open areas/fields are being developed at this very moment.  The spot where General Sill was killed is now a bank, and across the street roughly 10 acres are being bulldozed for new construction.  So many tons of dirt have been moved, that what the area originally looked like, versus now, well, there is no comparison.  Small hills area bulldozed flat, so the terrain is just totally different.

    The area known as the Slaughter Pen, well, the park has half of it, on the other side of the road, a hospital expansion, and a soon to be 4 lane road.  

    In the map attached, where it says Roberts(Bradley), marked by the X, I was lucky enough to make several evening/nighttime trips last fall (with permission), and found the bullets and canister you see.  The mound of dirt I am standing by, I found a Williams Cleaner bullet in the pile, I just eyeballed it laying there.  The pile itself was literally 2 stories high.  Dropped bullets, fired bullets, artillery shell fragments, percussion caps, you name it, lots of stuff came from that area.  People were finding tons of bullets just laying on top of the ground once the bulldozer went through.

    At Shiloh, we know almost exactly where specific regiments went through.  At Stones River, because of the destruction, you can only form vague generalities.  There is a Blue/Gray magazine with an in depth article, and tons of maps, about Stones River.  But, because of people metal detecting, and relics found including a Mississippi button, the maps in the magazine appear to be incorrect.  Not off by a lot, but off by up to 300 meters or more in some spots.  Heavy traffic in the area makes stopping to get out and look difficult as Mona can testify to for sure.  Sadly, I think we are just a generation or two away from a time when nobody will have much of an idea of where actions took place.  Somewhat like, "well, so and so troops passed through this area at this intersection by the gas station, or, it could have been down 3 blocks by the McDonald's, we just don't know."

    I was able to show her some areas off the park where we know exactly how troops moved.  And, naturally, you can see with good confidence where troops moved within the park.  Other areas, with no places to pull over, you have to "tell the story" as you drive by, but again those are mainly off park property.  I was able to show her 2 houses, still standing, that were used as field hospitals.  

    But, we had a good time for sure.  I tell you, we are lucky to have Shiloh so intact!

    Stan    

    IMG_0764.JPG

    finding a williams cleaner bullet at the Slaughter Pen Murfreesboro (2).jpg

    IMG_0772.JPG

    • Like 2

  13. I could not give you "sources" on this story to save my life.  One of those things you read, and remember reading, but can't "re-find" the story to save your life.  But I recall the story of a wounded soldier at Gettysburg.  He was wounded and he simply asked for a bowl of hot water each day (where and how he learned this I can't remember).  But, while wounded Federals were dying like flies around him, he eventually recovered and lived.  He washed his wound with hot water each day.  I just took a college course semi-regarding this medical subject.  What a shame, the U.S. was on the brink of technology that would have saved so many lives.  

    Just imagine what penicillin and Pepto could have done for those poor soldiers back then.

    Stan  

    • Like 2

  14. Well, Van Dorn wanted some of these captured weapons, but it was told to him that a lot of the weapons could not be brought off the field.  

    Which makes you think.

    How many of these "damaged guns" were outdated muskets, shotguns, etc., that Confederates "dropped" and picked up a better Yankee musket.

    Confederates would "probably" not waste their time trying to collect up all the damaged guns laying around.  Wagons were needed to ferry out the wounded.  It would take a lot of wagons to ferry out thousands of good condition muskets, much less damaged ones.  

    Plus, the Confederates did not have much time.  It would have required Confederates to go out by candlelight/torch to collect these weapons on the evening of the 6th.  Needless to say the rain that night.  The first priority was the wounded.  I wonder how much, if any, thought was given to this very subject: gathering up much needed weapons.  If it would have been of great importance, some considerable "force", slaves or what have you, would have been on hand to do that very thing, collect up weapons.

    I know that at Shiloh, in storage, they have 3 or 4 muskets found after the battle.  One was a type of "sporting musket".  It was broken in two, clearly to make it unusable.  The others were damaged and left on the field and were in relic condition when found.  The sporting musket looks brand new.

    But, 7,000, yes, that is a lot for sure!

    • Like 2

  15. Ozzy,

    Thanks, that is impressive!  I guess Loren and myself had a similar hobby.  Neat to see him in an obviously early war photograph.

    I guess I should have been more precise on my post.  The images I have posted, well, I am really looking for pre-war or wartime images of soldiers who were killed, wounded, or captured during the Shiloh campaign.  I have added a few that do not fall in to this category, but these were either Surgeons/Doctors that would have treated the wounded, and one or two of men with research worthy wartime accounts of Shiloh.

    I guess I "could" create an album of Shiloh participants, that would be a massive album to say the least, ha!

    Stan

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    • Thanks 1

  16. All,

    Well, as many of you know, I have worked a long time to develop the best image collection related to the Battle of Shiloh, and also, Corinth, Fort Donelson, and Iuka.  Never have thought to ask before, but if anyone has any images, or knows of any images, related to these battles, especially Shiloh.  Let me know, I would love to add them to the appropriate album.  I would speculate that the Shiloh Confederate and Federal albums is the largest online collection of images related to the Battle of Shiloh available, well, anywhere.  Hope everyone enjoys them!

     

    Stan

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