Jump to content
Shiloh Discussion Group

Ozzy

Member
  • Content Count

    1,666
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    276

Ozzy last won the day on July 8

Ozzy had the most liked content!

Community Reputation

738 Excellent

2 Followers

About Ozzy

  • Rank

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Reynella, South Australia
  • Occupation
    Writer
  • Interests
    Family history research, car restoration, travel...
    Welcome to my SDG page: the image at top is of Dubuque's Governor's Greys, which became Company 'I' of First Iowa Vol. Inf. Regt. (Uniform worn Battle of Wilson's Creek, 1861.)
    My book, Falling through the Hornet's Nest' (Martin Samuels) is now available at Amazon.com as ebook. My next book (focus on Henry Halleck 1861-62) entitled 'Shiloh was a Sham: the untold story of the iconic Civil War Battle,' will be available April 2016, on Amazon as e-book.

    I can be contacted at bzmax03@chariot.net.au by any SDG member so inclined.

Recent Profile Visitors

6,997 profile views
  1. Although similar to the first post of this topic, here is the recollection of Dabney Herndon Maury (USMA 1846): "In the Corps of Cadets [during my time there] were many besides McClellan and 'Stonewall' Jackson who have become famous. There was Grant, a very good and kindly fellow (USMA 1843) whom everybody liked. He was proficient in mathematics, but did not try to excel at anything except horsemanship. In the Riding School he was very daring. When his turn came to leap the bar, he would make the dragoons lift it from the trestles and raise it as high as their heads, when he would drive his horse over it, clearing at least six feet." https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=nc01.ark:/13960/t7mp6536s&view=1up&seq=42 Recollections by D. H. Maury (1894).
  2. The website <docsouth.unc.edu> "Documenting the American South" presents a list of perhaps 200 diaries and journals compiled during the War Between the States. Most are not Shiloh related, but some make mention of Fort Donelson and Shiloh (Mary Chesnut, for example.) Just about every diary has a link allowing online viewing: https://docsouth.unc.edu/fpn/texts.html Documenting the American South.
  3. Willis Brewer was not at Shiloh. Born in 1844, he joined the Confederate Army at age of 18 and performed clerical duties, until incorporated onto the staff of General Wirt Adams. After the War he became involved in politics and in 1892 published a comprehensive "Alabama: her history, Resources, War Record and Public Men." Although the first several chapters are interesting, for our purposes the most important information begins page 589: "War Record - War Between the States." Beginning with the 1st Alabama Infantry, every regiment of infantry, artillery and cavalry from Alabama is recorded, along with significant engagements, and key personnel. The Infantry regiments are listed in order; Clanton's 1st Alabama Cavalry begins page 677 and Brewer's Mississippi & Alabama Battalion gains mention beginning page 691 (8th Confederate Regiment). Ketchum's Battery on page 696 and Gage's Battery on page 698. Miscellaneous commands begin page 705. There are a few surprises to be found in the histories of the Alabama regiments... but will leave the interested reader to find those, herself. https://archive.org/details/alabamaherhisto00brewgoog/page/n597 Brewer's Alabama History. Biography of Willis Brewer: http://www.encyclopediaofalabama.org/article/h-3799
  4. Besides family, the people who know us best are those we attended school with. Here are a couple of observations of Ulysses S. Grant (one of which you've probably encountered already. But the other...) "One day at West Point, as our section in mathematics was marching to recitation hall, Frank Gardner produced an old silver-cased watch, about four inches in diameter. It, as a curiosity, was passed along from one lad to another... it chanced to be in Grant's hands as we reached the door of the recitation room, and he tucked it into his tunic and buttoned it up. The regular Professor was absent; Cadet Z. B. Tower occupied his chair. He sent four cadets to the blackboards, Grant being one. Grant quickly solved his math problem, and turned to begin his demonstration, when all of a sudden the room was filled with a sound not unlike a Chinese gong. All looked amazed, and Tower, thinking the noise was in the hall, ordered the door closed. And that only made the matter worse. Grant, with a sober countenance, continued his demonstration. The racket ceased, and shortly afterwards, so did Grant. Tower had no idea from whence the noise came (Gardner had accidentally set the alarm on the ancient timepiece concealed in Grant's bosom.) Tower's bewilderment, and Grant's sobriety afforded us much amusement." Rufus Ingalls (USMA 1843) was known at West Point as "the Prince of Good Fellows." During the Civil War, he served as Chief Quartermaster of the Army of the Potomac; and one night during Spring of 1865, at City Point, he and General Grant and a few others were sitting around their camp fire. Conversation had lapsed into silence, which after a while was suddenly broken by Grant exclaiming: "Ingalls, do you expect to take that yellow dog of yours into Richmond with you?" Ingalls nodded. "Oh yes, General. You see, he belongs to a long-life breed." Silence returned, but many of the witnesses had to remove themselves for a time...
  5. The 19th Arkansas Infantry (Dockery's) was mustered into service in southern Arkansas (DeValls Bluff) on 2 April 1862 under command of Colonel Hamilton Smead and immediately ordered to Corinth, Mississippi... but began arriving at Memphis on April 7th ...too late to take part in the Battle of Shiloh. Instead of going on to Corinth, the 19th Arkansas was directed to Fort Pillow, a few miles above Memphis on the Mississippi River (and the Confederate fallback position after fall of Island No.10) and transport was provided aboard CSS Capitol: http://www.rfrajola.com/JPMCSN/JPMCSN.pdf Collection of Confederate Covers by Robert Frajola (see page 48.) In a letter written aboard CSS Capitol by LtCol Thomas Hale he tells his friend in Fredericksburg, Virginia of the circumstances in Memphis as he found them on 7 April 1862. The 19th Arkansas remained at Fort Pillow for a few weeks, and suffered a number of deaths due to disease. After Fort Pillow was evacuated, the 19th Arkansas was sent to Corinth, and joined Van Dorn's Army of the West, Third Division (Dabney Maury) 1st Brigade (Dockery). [After Memphis surrendered 6 June 1862 the CSS Capitol was put to use as "support vessel" for CSS Arkansas, which was completed on the Yazoo River and made her famous run through three Federal fleets in July 1862.]
  6. Following on the Confederate evacuation from Corinth end of May 1862, many in the Government at Richmond became quite unhappy with the performance of General PGT Beauregard. President Jefferson Davis, in particular, harbored a grudge that stemmed from Beauregard's publication of his Manassas report in newspapers (criticizing Davis' role in not promoting pursuit of the retreating Federals as they fled pell- mell towards Washington.) The grudge festered with the death of Davis' friend, Albert Sidney Johnston at Shiloh, and Beauregard's cavalier report of that man's death, tacked into a telegram claiming Complete Victory on April 6th. The final straw that broke the camel's back was Beauregard's "unauthorized" evacuation from Corinth, without first engaging Federal forces in battle. It appears President Davis merely bided his time... and when Braxton Bragg reported that Beauregard had departed on sick leave (for a health spa near Mobile) the opportunity presented, and Davis struck, replacing Beauregard on 17 June 1862 with Bragg as commander of what would now be called the Army of Tennessee. Stephen R. Mallory, Confederate Secretary of the Navy, was one of the few Cabinet officers to keep a diary. His entry for 21 June 1862: "Interesting Cabinet meeting yesterday. President had ordered Bragg, who was second in command at Corinth, to proceed to Mississippi and assume command. Beauregard would not permit Bragg to go, but left Bragg in command, and goes himself to Mobile for his health. Beauregard, with the finest army ever found upon this continent, about 100,000 strong, remained about six weeks after the battle of Shiloh inactive, with the enemy in his front, and then retreated without notice to the President or War Department. And up to this time no reason for his retreat is known, and now he abandons his army without leave or notice. My own idea is that his mind has given way under the weight of his command; and that finding Bragg about to leave him, he ran away from an army he could not manage. If a soldier were thus to go off without leave he would be tried for desertion and be probably shot, and an officer would be shot or cashiered. Beauregard has never voluntarily fought a battle... and never will. Bragg is left in command, and he may do better." https://finding-aids.lib.unc.edu/02229/#folder_4#1 Diary of S.R. Mallory, Secretary of Navy (CSA) at Uni North Carolina Library.
  7. Mona General Samuel Cooper at find-a-grave: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/8827/samuel-cooper and West Point Class of 1815 details: http://penelope.uchicago.edu/Thayer/E/Gazetteer/Places/America/United_States/Army/USMA/Cullums_Register/156*.html
  8. As a rule, I am not a fan of audio presentations, without video to enhance it. But while doing some sorting and rearranging in the office, put this American Military History Podcast – Shiloh on… and was pleasantly surprised. The Story of Shiloh, as told by the narrator, is not far off from how I believe a fair telling of the Battle of Shiloh should run. The full presentation requires just over an hour, so in the interest of allowing “bits of most interest” to be accessed (begin at 4 minute mark): 4 minutes PGT Beauregard, upon receiving a report on 2 APR that, “Lew Wallace is moving his Division west, thus dividing Grant’s army,” initiates the Rebel move from Corinth; 23 mins General Sherman in the days prior to Battle of Shiloh: 26:30 Jesse Appler and the 53rd Ohio annoy Sherman; 29:30 U.S. Grant hears the guns of battle; 29:30 Beauregard believes surprise has been lost, and attempts to abort attack; 31:40 Peabody 39:00 Grant meets Sherman at 10 a.m. 45:30 Rebel attack plan of “driving the Union northwest, into the swamp” is inadvertently altered to “driving the Federals northeast, towards the Landing” 47:30 Prentiss frustrates the Rebels by holding on in the Thicket. 52:30 The death of Albert Sidney Johnston; 55:00 Prentiss surrenders. 57:30 The last assault, against Grant’s Last Line. 58:00 Beauregard ends Day One operations. 61:00 Lew Wallace… 64:00 Grant’s errors… 65:00 Nathan Bedford Forrest 66:30 Colonel Helm’s bad intelligence, advising, “Buell is moving south…” The podcast finishes with a brief description of Fallen Timbers, and summary of casualties. Overall, I found the presentation impressive, and mostly accurate. Most errors were due to editing (errors of omission) as opposed to Fact errors. But, have a listen, and tell me what you think. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NVVYl_dAB4c Shiloh podcast of 4 July 2018 by American Military History Podcast on YouTube. [Fourteen other Civil War battle narratives by the same organization available on YouTube, including Fort Sumter, Bull Run, Wilson's Creek and Second Manassas https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MI6-GfRVbPA&list=PLZ487KCnJN833w3UKDCSNZGYkkAC9_kF6 ]
  9. Mona Thanks for providing the additional information on Samuel Cooper (whose last act with the U.S. Government, before resigning, is said to have been the Dismissal of Twiggs.) The ranking of Cooper as General Number One also led to animosity in the Confederate Army... Joseph Johnston, in particular, who considered everyone ranked above him as "undeserving." Some additional links of interest, added because until running across Cooper's Militia Tactics, the number of different bugle calls and drum rolls for "regulating" soldiers in battle, and day-to-day activities, was assumed to be far fewer than turns out: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PXC5BktPnWM Boots and Saddles (cavalry readiness alert) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0fvkihdRV5g A variety of Civil War drum alerts.
  10. We’re all familiar with Hardee’s Light Infantry Tactics, the 86-page guide that became the handbook for Volunteer Infantry Regiments – on both sides -- during the Civil War. But, what if yours was a Cavalry regiment… or an Artillery battery? The 1836 publication, A Concise System of Instructions and Regulations for the Militia and Volunteers written by Samuel Cooper was the latest handbook available for Calvary (pages 129 – 176) and Artillery (pages 177 – 213). In the Preface, Brevet-Captain Cooper describes the role of Volunteer Militia as, “responsible for repelling sudden invasion, and suppressing domestic insurrection.” And his handbook of nearly 300 pages provided every bit of knowledge necessary to assemble a cavalry or artillery unit, drill it in proper execution of duties, and most importantly, how to “interface with Infantry, in order to avoid embarrassment.” The Regulations mentioned in the title are not Army Legal Statutes, but “drum and bugle calls established for regulating troop movements” (pages 215 – 225). And, in case you are wondering, “Why does this Handbook begin on Page 129” …it doesn’t. The first hundred pages are Infantry and Rifle Tactics (subsequently updated by Hardee.) But Cooper’s guidebook includes diagrams, and Hardee’s does not: diagrams for infantry movements, cavalry movements and artillery operations are to be found pages 56 – 59 and 99 - 108 (Infantry); 174 – 177 (Cavalry); 208 – 213 (Artillery). Who was Samuel Cooper? Graduate of West Point (Class of 1815) this officer, trained in artillery and adjutant general functions, served in the U. S. Army until March 7th 1861. He resigned, and offered his services to the Confederate States of America (and became the senior General in the Confederate States Army.) References: https://archive.org/stream/hardeesrifleligh01hard#page/n1/mode/2up Hardee's Light Infantry Tactics https://archive.org/details/concisesystemof00coop/page/n6 Samuel Cooper's Concise System ...for Militia and Volunteers
  11. I've always been one who believed, "Don't throw out the baby with the bath water." So when this original NPS film of Shiloh was discovered on YouTube, it seemed appropriate to add it to the references section, for others to view. And having it available allows discussion of the good and bad aspects of this 60+ year old work: First, it is in color, and the views of the battlefield circa 1956 permit identification of changes over time; There is an attempt at balance: the efforts and sacrifice of both opponents are given fair treatment in respect to each other; The most obvious error: giving credit to General Prentiss for the action of Colonel Peabody in sending out Powell's patrol; The second most obvious error: NO mention of William Tecumseh Sherman and the actions of the Fifth Division; Third most obvious error: no mention of McClernand, Hurlbut or Stuart (or Webster or Powell) Although the models used were mediocre, the effort to recognize the Navy's contribution is commendable; The attempt is made to explain Bloody Pond, the Peach Orchard, the Sunken Road, and the Hornet's Nest (for the benefit of park visitors) The charts and drawings used are simple, but reasonably accurate (especially the depiction of Grant's Last Line). Although this film has obvious flaws, it is an easy matter for those of us who study the Battle of Shiloh to recognize those flaws... and enjoy the telling of the story. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LbjXqwAOhgw Posted on YouTube by LionHeart Film Works on 6 April 2019.
  12. Posted Mineral Point News of 16 APR 1862 page 3.
  13. It took a couple of days for word to reach the villages and farms in the North that a massive contest had taken place along the bank of the Tennessee River. And the initial reports seemed to indicate “another Union victory, with moderate casualties,” such as resulted for the Union at Fort Henry and Fort Donelson and Island No.10 …but after those initial reports, other stories began to appear, not just from embedded reporters, but letters and other eyewitness accounts from soldiers themselves, and these presented sensational details at odds with the initial rosy narrative. And these details grew progressively horrific: not hundreds of casualties, but thousands… maybe tens of thousands… Suddenly, Casualty Lists were in demand; but the Northern newspapers could not provide them. As occurred after Forts Henry and Donelson, the regional papers contacted Chicago for details… and were given only Chicago-specific lists of casualties. And the Horror of Shiloh continued, with full Casualty Lists never appearing in most Northern newspapers: the affected families were slowly and sporadically informed of the fate of their loved ones by mail: comrades of their sons and fathers who knew what happened (or thought they did); and official letters of condolence when facts could be positively determined. Meanwhile, the waiting, and not knowing, became almost intolerable… Unknown to the people in the North, one newspaper had taken extraordinary steps to compile a Master Casualty List of Wounded Men, and that paper was not in Chicago or Cincinnati, but St. Louis. Beginning with the April 15th edition, the Daily Missouri Republican published names of wounded men who arrived at St. Louis aboard the Hospital boat, D.A. January (two full columns on Page One.) And although Hospital boats Crescent City and City of Louisiana soon arrived at St. Louis, other boats pressed into service as floating Hospitals offloaded their human cargo at New Albany, Evansville, Cincinnati, Louisville, Paducah and Cairo; the Daily Missouri Republican “borrowed” reports from local papers of those river ports and repeated them on the pages of the St. Louis paper: • 17 APR page 3 Minnehaha wounded offloaded at Louisville (CSA and USA) • 18 APR page 1 John J. Roe casualties offloaded at Evansville • 19 APR page 1 War Eagle casualties arrived St. Louis • 19 APR page 2 Empress casualties arrived at St. Louis • 19 APR page 3 Magnolia casualties arrived Cincinnati • 20 APR page 1 Imperial casualties arrived St. Louis • 20 APR page 1 Black Hawk casualties arrived Cairo • 20 APR page 2 Tycoon casualties arrived 17 APR at Cincinnati • 20 APR page 2 Lancaster casualties arrived at Cincinnati • 20 APR page 2 B. J. Adams casualties arrived New Albany In addition, edition for 22 APR page 3 lists all of the Hospitals in St. Louis where the wounded men from Pittsburg Landing were housed. Shortly after his arrival at Pittsburg Landing, Henry Halleck sent a telegram to Brigadier General Strong at Cairo (15 APR 1862): “All the wounded have been sent to Hospital. Stop all sanitary commissions, nurses and citizens. We don’t want any more.” References: Daily Missouri Republican, issues 9 APR through 23 APR 1862 and available: https://digital.shsmo.org/digital/collection/dmr/id/15091/rec/3182 Missouri Daily Republican for 15 APR 1862 https://digital.shsmo.org/digital/collection/dmr/search/page/318 Access to all editions of Missouri Daily Republican at State Historical Society of Missouri Note: The first known reference published in the North referred to “an attack against our forces at Pittsburg Landing by Beauregard” went to print on 8 APR 1862 and was discredited as “a rumor from Paducah.” The second reference to the Battle of Pittsburg Landing was published 9 APR 1862 and was a telegram sent from Henry Halleck to SecWar Stanton on April 8, full contents of which: “The enemy attacked our forces at Pittsburg Tennessee yesterday (April 7) but was repulsed with heavy loss. No details given.” Further note: Beginning 15 APR 1862 the same editions of this newspaper contained names and details of Confederate prisoners captured at Battle of Pittsburg Landing and transported to St. Louis and elsewhere (initially aboard steamer, Woodfolk -- see page one, column 6.)
  14. Ozzy

    14th Iowa "diary"

    Mona The other Federal units to recruit men from Savannah and Hardin County in March and April 1862 were the 40th Illinois (Hicks) the 46th Ohio (Worthington) the USS Lexington (Shirk) the USS Tyler (Gwin) and the USS Alfred Robb. The Roster for the 40th Illinois includes names of Tennessee men recruited into Company C, and Colonel Thomas Worthington recorded names of the Savannah men recruited into his Companies A, B, D, G, I and K (on a slip of paper he compiled a day or two after the Battle of Shiloh, because I believe the camp of the 46th Ohio was overrun and their records lost.) The three gunboats would all have names of recruits entered in their Logbooks. Unfortunately, only select pages of the Operational History (Ledger) of the 14th Iowa Infantry are available online… at the present time. As regards Lewis Sutton’s father, Philip: he survived the war, returned to Mount Pleasant, Iowa and lived until November 1880. Cheers Ozzy
  15. Ozzy

    14th Iowa "diary"

    [from Clark County H.S.] Lewis Wells Sutton was born in Ohio in November 1839 and in about 1855 migrated with his Father Philip, Mother Elizabeth, and five brothers and sisters to Henry County, Iowa. The railroads at that time were advertising “cheap land,” the first bridge over the Mississippi River had been completed (with likelihood of a ribbon of steel soon reaching California), and the Sutton Family was certainly drawn to some of the richest farmland in America by the promise of a Golden Future. The eruption of War in 1861 put on hold the Dreams of the Future: Lewis (20) and his brother Jacob (18) enlisted in the 14th Iowa Volunteer Infantry, Company I, in October. Mustered in at Davenport, the 14th Iowa saw service at Fort Donelson with Lauman’s Brigade of C.F. Smith’s Second Division. And then moved on to Pittsburg Landing. And along the way, Lewis Sutton was promoted to Corporal. And the 14th Iowa (Colonel Shaw) was attached to Tuttle’s Brigade of C.F. Smith’s Second Division (but with General Smith away sick, the Division was under acting command of Brigadier General WHL Wallace, effective 2 April 1862.) And the under-strength 14th Iowa (Companies A and B were detached months earlier to fight Indians in Minnesota) recruited new members from the Union-supporting residents of Savannah. On Sunday morning, April 6th the 14th Iowa was marched south “toward the sound of the guns” and upon witnessing a distant hoard wearing butternut emerging from the trees below them, Colonel Tuttle directed the 14th Iowa to line along a trail to the ESE along the top of the slope. When fully deployed, the regiment almost connected with the 500 remaining men of General Prentiss’s Sixth Division (Prentiss soon to be reinforced by the 23rd Missouri in a position to become known as The Thicket.) And the 8th Iowa was detached from Sweeny’s Brigade to fill the gap between Prentiss and the 14th Iowa. After holding the position nearly eight hours, the 14th Iowa Infantry was surrendered by Colonel Shaw (with Corporal Sutton one of those captured.) In October 1862 Lewis Sutton (along with all the surviving Shiloh Prisoners) was released from confinement at Camp Oglethorpe (Macon, Georgia) and returned to Union lines; and in early 1863 the reformed 14th Iowa returned to duty. The loss of men due to battle and disease resulted in promotion of veteran soldiers: Lewis Sutton gained advancement to Sergeant Major. And for the remainder of his enlistment, Sergeant Major Sutton assisted the Regimental Adjutant with keeping the Ledger of the 14th Iowa: Muster rolls, casualty lists, record of significant occurrences… it reads like a diary. Lewis Sutton’s enlistment expired end of 1864 and he returned to Iowa, and eventually went into business at Mount Pleasant, and then at Ottumwa. In 1893 Mr. Sutton relocated his family to Vancouver Washington, established a business, and lived out the rest of his life (Lewis Sutton died July 1914 at the age of 75.) Fifty years later, Lewis Sutton’s granddaughter donated his Civil War materials to the local historical society (Clark County Washington Historical Society.) The brown leather satchel containing Sergeant Major Sutton’s materials was stored in the basement… and it appears no one bothered to investigate the contents until 2011. And even in 2011, they did not realize what they had in their possession (calling it “Lewis Sutton’s Diary.”) It is actually the Regimental Ledger for the 14th Iowa Infantry, and should have gone into the Official Records storage of the War Department after the Civil War ended. But, somehow, Sergeant Major Sutton ended up with it. And it is now in the possession of the Clark County Historical Society. Why is this important? Most researchers never see a Regimental Ledger, or what it contains (these Ledgers are now kept by NARA and are difficult for interested parties to access.) This particular 14th Iowa Ledger should contain the names of all the Savannah Tennessee men recruited into service before the Battle of Shiloh. And the Ledger provides an excellent example of how the Casualty List was maintained. References: https://www.columbian.com/news/2011/jul/19/donated-satchel-yields-writings-of-a-civil-war-sol/ Lewis Sutton's diary https://www.columbian.com/news/2014/apr/02/clark-county-historical-museum-civil-war-exhibit/ 2014 exhibition at Clark County H.S. of Vancouver Washington https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/139406853 Lewis Wells Sutton 14th Iowa Infantry Co.I
×
×
  • Create New...