Jump to content
Shiloh Discussion Group

Ozzy

Member
  • Content Count

    1,624
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    263

Everything posted by Ozzy

  1. Ozzy

    Jane got a Gun

    While trying to decide whether to watch a movie or go to bed the other night, I switched on the TV and scanned what was on offer: Jane got a Gun was advertised as "a Western, set after the Civil War" and it starred Natalie Portman, Joel Edgerton and Ewan McGregor. Since I'd never seen it (never heard of it) I figured I would give it a go... After ten or fifteen minutes, I decided this story (about a bounty hunter in New Mexico who is hired by his former fiance (before he enlisted in the Union Army)... Now, she is married to someone else; and she wants her former fiance to avenge the shooting of the man she married... This movie was not for me. As I took control of the remote, the two characters played by McGregor and Edgerton (John Bishop and Dan Frost) commenced a conversation: John: "You see this revolver? It's one of my prized possessions... got it from General Beauregard for helping him at Shiloh." Dan just glances at the displayed weapon without making remark. John: "You know, it's funny," continues John. "They told us later that Shiloh meant, "Place of Peace.'" Dan, shaking his head: "Warn't nothin' peaceful about Shiloh..." I put down the remote; decided to give this movie another few minutes... But although there were more Civil War references, there was nothing more about Shiloh. Still... although I rate this as "half-a-star" (out of five -- one of the worst films ever made) it stands as "The most recent feature film to contain some reference to Shiloh." https://www.imdb.com/title/tt2140037/?ref_=tt_ch "Jane got a Gun" (2015) entry at imdb. Ozzy
  2. Ozzy

    55th TN Infantry, Company H

    Terrie Welcome to Shiloh Discussion Group. In our "Resources" section (bottom of Main Page) we had compiled a list of resources for use in tracking details of Tennessee CSA ancestors, under "Ancestor Veterans (CSA)" -- unfortunately, many of the links utilized have broken since that list was created, so will attempt to refresh the information, here: First of all, be aware there were TWO Tennessee 55th Infantry Regiments: Brown's and McKoin's. Brown's 55th Tennessee fought at Island No.10 and was mostly captured there on 8 April 1862, while McKoin's 55th Tennessee fought at Shiloh, part of SAM Wood's 3rd Brigade, of William J. Hardee's Third Army Corps. Also part of SAM Wood's Brigade was the 44th Tennessee Infantry (Coleman A. McDaniel) -- this is important because after Battle of Shiloh, the 55th Infantry and 44th Infantry were combined into the "44th Consolidated Tennessee Infantry" (sometimes called "44th Tennessee Infantry, Second Organization") and search for ancestor records after Shiloh must be done through the 44th Tennessee. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shiloh_Confederate_order_of_battle Shiloh -- Confederate Order of Battle (scroll down to SAM Wood in 3rd Army Corps) https://ehistory.osu.edu/books/official-records/010/0607 Colonel McDaniel, 44th Tennessee report No.221 page 607 - 609 for Battle of Shiloh. The 55th Tennessee did not submit an after-action report; Colonel McDaniel's report makes brief, but important mention of 55th Tennessee at Shiloh. In OR 10 part one [link provided.] https://www.familysearch.org/wiki/en/55th_Regiment,_Tennessee_Infantry_(McKoin's) The free site, provided by Mormon Church, contains valuable records. If someone has previously contributed records belonging to your ancestor, they are easy to access at familysearch.org (otherwise "fold3" will need to be used, which is a subscription site associated with ancestry.com). Try familysearch.org first. https://sos.tn.gov/products/tsla/bibliography-tennessee-civil-war-unit-histories-tennessee-state-library-and-archives-0 The Tennessee Secretary of State maintains an extensive collection of Tennessee Civil War records. This link is to the Bibliography of those records. https://sos.tn.gov/tsla/civil-war Tennessee Secretary of State site, offering access to maps, battle histories, etc (Civil War). http://www.tennessee-scv.org/4455/44lind.html History of the 44th Tennessee Infantry. http://www.tennessee-scv.org/4455/55titcw.html History of McKoin's 55th Tennessee Infantry. Tennesseans in the Civil War hathitrust -- place the search term at left into Google or Bing or Yahoo and hit [search]. http://www.tngenweb.org/mcnairy/tngw.html All Tennessee counties have tngenweb sites that allow searching for ancestor veterans (some counties do it better than others). But, if you know which county your ancestor was from, try the tngenweb site maintained by that county (usually, Military History is kept in Special Projects or Civil War or...) http://tennessee-scv.org/4455/TN55.txt Roster of the 44th Consolidated Tennessee Infantry http://www.petersburgbreakthrough.org/44thTNnotes.htm 44th Tennessee Infantry Descendants Association Hopefully, this is enough to get you started. Let us know how your search progresses. Good Luck!
  3. Ozzy

    Library of Congress, online

    http://www.loc.gov/rr/askalib/ "Ask a Librarian, online" The Library of Congress, the World's premier library service, offers online access to their collection that rivals "showing up in person." Click on the above link, fill in the form (with as much detail as possible, based on personal search of LOC Catalogue), and submit the query... In my own recent experience, I desired a Letter addressed to one of our favourite Generals, John A. Logan, from the Showman, P.T. Barnum. Believed to be stored with the "John Alexander Logan Family Papers" there was no "master listing" of items held; and the Letter (if it was held) could have been in any of the boxes, 1 - 33... although I believed it was most likely in Box 1, or Box 6, or Box 33. Not having any unrealistic expectation (but just wanting to know if the Letter was held by Library of Congress) I enabled the above link... completed the Query Form (including my concern that the Letter may be in any of the three boxes)... and hit, Submit Query. That was late last night... Today, when I awoke, I found a reply from Library of Congress not only verifying, "Yes, we hold that Letter," but with a facsimile of the complete Letter -- all four pages -- from P.T. Barnum. If you have not tried the Online service at Library of Congress recently, you will be in for a pleasant surprise... Ozzy
  4. Annie Wittenmyer, nurse and agent for the Iowa State Sanitary Commission, arrived at Savannah Tennessee aboard a Hospital steamer at 4 a.m. on 7 April 1862. There, the medical staff and passengers aboard the steamboat were informed, "Grant has been driven to the river; he and his Army are likely to be captured today." Hearing that news, "our Hospital boat raced for Pittsburg Landing..." They arrived before sunrise, and while the overnight Navy bombardment (one shell every 15 minutes) continued, and immediately set to work: feeding wounded men, dressing their wounds, providing them with water... The entire story runs pages 28 - 35 and is one of many Shiloh memories to be found in Under the Guns: A Woman's Reminiscences of the Civil War (1895) by Annie Wittenmyer. Other interesting stories to be discovered: pages 43 - 47 "U.S. Grant and the Issue of Passes" page 128 "A Painful Accident" [Governor Harvey of Wisconsin] page 164 "Searching for the Dead" [a Mother from Pennsylvania comes to Pittsburg Landing, looking for the grave of her son...] Also included are memories of the Siege of Vicksburg (and other campaigns). And there are tales of corruption and malpractice (involving Army surgeons and Sanitary Commission stores, and how they got away with their criminal behavior); and details of Generals (such as Grant and McPherson and Logan) not to be found anywhere else. https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=osu.32435008944803;view=1up;seq=1 Annie Wittenmyer's Under the Guns.
  5. Ozzy

    Mrs. General John Logan

    Sometimes you find details where you least expect them... and this autobiography is a real gem: Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife by Mary Logan https://archive.org/details/reminiscencesas02logagoog/page/n8 The view from Cairo of "what was taking place, just across the Ohio River" (...and I was going to just list the "important bits" relevant to us at Shiloh Discussion Group): pp. 100 - 116 Muster and drill in Southern Illinois (31st Illinois Infantry, Colonel Logan -- Member of Congress) pp. 116 - 118 Battle of Belmont (as experienced by those waiting for the Troop Transports to return) page 120 The 31st Illinois meets General Grant pp. 121 - 122 Fort Henry pp. 122 - 126 Fort Donelson (where Colonel Logan is wounded. His wife, Mary, describes her efforts to retrieve him from the battlefield.) pp. 127 - 129 The move up the Tennessee River to Pittsburg Landing (reflects a civilian's understanding of what took place) page 129 Major General Halleck in command. page 130 General Halleck is called to Washington (and General Grant resumes command...) But, the most important bits are "what came afterwards..." pp. 130 - 131 The relationship of Generals James B. McPherson and John Logan pp. 159 - 161 The replacement of Army of the Tennessee Commander John Logan with O. O. Howard pp. 162 - 168 Incredible exchange of letters after the war between William T. Sherman and John Logan, reflecting on "interpersonal relationships" involving Sherman, Logan, O. O. Howard, George H. Thomas and Ulysses S. Grant. pp. 170 - 172 Another illuminating exchange between Grenville Dodge and John Logan (regarding Dodge, Logan, WT Sherman and George Thomas). If you want to understand "why Union commanders related to each other the way they did," and "why friction seemed to appear from nowhere" (and how those interpersonal relationships impacted actual "fighting of the War"), then this is a good place to start... "Harmony" Ozzy
  6. As we know, Van Dorn's Army (recently defeated at Pea Ridge, Arkansas) was "required" to come East, and join with the Army of the Mississippi at Corinth. Very little arrived in time for Shiloh; the following work describes the belated movement east, and participation in the Siege of Corinth, from the Rebel viewpoint: A Southern Record: History of the Third Regiment, Louisiana Infantry by (Major) William H. Tunnard and published at Baton Rouge (1866). Beginning page 161, details of the march via Little Rock, to steamers bound for Memphis, and riding the Memphis & Charleston, arriving at Corinth on May 1st 1862. The reception received, immediate involvement in skirmishing... coupled with news (received May 6th) of the Surrender of New Orleans, followed by terms of enlistment expiring (but the new Conscript Act interfered with plans...) [The 3rd Louisiana and Colonel Hebert later played a significant role at Vicksburg (3rd Louisiana Redan). And there are details "why Southern men admired Ben McCulloch" -- killed at Battle of Pea Ridge, Arkansas in March 1862.] https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=uc2.ark:/13960/t8kd1r57h;view=1up;seq=9 History of the 3rd Louisiana Infantry by W. H. Tunnard (1866).
  7. Ozzy

    Julia Dent Grant

    As we know, Julia Dent Grant had a profound influence on her husband, including support, advocate, confidant. When separated by military duty, the two exchanged letters almost daily: it could be said that Julia was General Grant's rock. The linked website is recently constructed, and one of the best biographies of its kind to be found on the internet, as "First Lady Julia Grant" contains information about family, friends, locations of homes and travel involving herself and General Grant not easily found elsewhere: Frederick T. Dent: Grant's West Point roommate (and Julia's brother) photographs of Grant family homes photographs of Julia and Ulysses Grant at significant events family photographs of the Grants. http://www.firstladies.org/biographies/firstladies.aspx?biography=19 Brief biography of Julia Dent Grant.
  8. Ozzy

    Julia Dent Grant

    The General's Wife: the Life of Mrs. Ulysses S. Grant, published 1959 by Ishbel Ross; Dodd, Meade & Co., New York is another collection of letters and memories, centered on Julia Dent Grant (as she observed the enormity of History taking place around her -- and had her own "brushes with fate and notoriety.") This work is valuable, to compare with other references, and extend general knowledge of General Grant and his wife. Available online: https://archive.org/details/generalswifethel010870mbp/page/n5
  9. Beginning almost immediately after the Battle of Shiloh, and for all the years since, people have attempted to make sense of the late arrival of Major General Grant at Pittsburg Landing, his flagship, Tigress, nosing into the bank as much as four hours after first contact with the enemy. What follows is a proposed progression of General Grant's efforts to "get into the fight" that Sunday morning, 6 April 1862: 7:11 a.m. While having breakfast at the Cherry Mansion in Savannah, Grant heard booming cannon. 8:30 (approx.) Grant and members of his Staff, aboard Tigress, stop at Crump's Landing and direct Lew Wallace to "Wait in readiness..." 9 - 9:30 After meeting with one (and possibly two) steamers enroute, sent to alert him, Grant arrives at Pittsburg Landing. Grant and members of his Staff ride up the bluff, and meet with BGen WHL Wallace. Convinced of a major engagement, Grant sends away Rawlins with orders to "release the officers in arrest," and "bring up Lew Wallace." AAG Rawlins relays the orders for Lew Wallace to AQM Baxter, who rides Tigress to Crump's Landing. 10 a.m. Grant meets with Sherman. Either just before, or just after meeting Sherman, General Grant encountered the 2nd Illinois Cavalry, lined up, awaiting orders. Grant places Captain Hotaling on his Staff, for the day, and directs him to "place and fight Birge's Western Sharpshooters." Grant sends away Cavalry officer Frank Bennett (north along the River Road) with orders to "escort Lew Wallace back to here." 10:30 (approx.) Riding south down the road to Hamburg, General Grant meets with BGen Hurlbut. Leaving Hurlbut, Grant rides west and meets BGen Prentiss... and tells him, "Hold this position at all hazards." Do you agree with the above timeline? Is there a time or location that seems improbable? Is there another significant action/ decision that should be added? Please feel free to offer suggestions... Ozzy
  10. Joe Thanks for this post. Every piece helps complete the puzzle; and the real story of Shiloh is slowly, steadily coming together... Your Busbey Report is logical, plausible, and makes for clear understanding [except for the final paragraph, indicating statement of someone named "Ross," and what appears to be "missing details," a sentence or two edited out, resulting in time compression. The Tigress is at Crump's; then it is at Pittsburg; yet the conversation involving Ross (and his knowledge of Baxter) seems to occur before Tigress arrived at Pittsburg Landing.] Or, is the real claim being made: Baxter received his orders aboard Tigress... before Tigress arrived at Pittsburg? One (or two) of the remaining pieces to the puzzle: who acted as messenger, sent by WHL Wallace from Pittsburg Landing aboard John Warner ? (Was the John Raine also sent? And, if so, who rode the John Raine ?) I have only ever seen the messenger refered to as "a lieutenant." Never a name. But, I have suspicions regarding who acted as messenger... and I am hopeful that when the Diary of Israel P. Rumsey is released to the public, the identity of that man will be disclosed. All the best Ozzy
  11. Ozzy

    Shiloh Masters Thesis (2)

    Another day, another master’s thesis… and this one, submitted by William J. McCaffrey in 1970 is revealing, compelling, shocking. Although 140 pages long, this work grips the student of Battle of Shiloh by the throat, and does not let go. It examines “whether or not there was surprise at Pittsburg Landing on April 6th 1862”…and just who was surprised. On page three, a list of six items is posted: flawed conditions of readiness, at least one of which must be present to allow a Defender to get surprised by an Attacker. William McCaffrey devotes the remainder of his thesis to providing evidence of the presence of many of those six conditions of “un-readiness” at Pittsburg Landing in the days, hours and minutes leading up to General Albert Sidney Johnston’s attack. This report contains maps, an excellent list of references, and is constructed by a man concerned about “the lessons of History, and how to avoid the mistakes of History.” Have a read, and decide for yourself how close William McCaffrey, West Point Class of 1958, comes to the mark. Masters Thesis by William J. McCaffrey (1970) “Shiloh: a case study in Surprise” submitted to U.S. Army Command and General Staff College at Fort Leavenworth, KS and on file with National Technical Information Service: https://apps.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/733391.pdf
  12. Ozzy

    Shiloh Day Trip 02/02/2019

    Great photo... and of benefit to learn that the significant action in the Plum Orchard has finally been recognized... 🙂
  13. Ozzy

    Miss Carroll's idea?

    Ever since its stunning success, there has been debate: Who was responsible for concocting the scheme to move the Union Army up the Tennessee River? General U.S. Grant said it was "his idea, initially labelled as 'ridiculous' when presented to Henry Halleck in early January 1862." In his Memoirs, page 220, William Tecumseh Sherman claims: "I was with Henry Halleck when he came up with the idea to advance up the Tennessee River." But, what if they both are wrong; what if the real developer and promoter of the move up the Tennessee River, bypassing and turning Fort Columbus... was Anna Ella Carroll ? Have a read of the attached book, A Military Genius: the Life of Anna Ella Carroll, (especially Chapter 4 -- Goes to St. Louis: inception of the plan of the Tennessee Campaign) and tell me what you think: http://www.gutenberg.org/files/21909/21909-h/21909-h.htm#page031 Cheers Ozzy
  14. Ozzy

    Crump wharf

    On the above list of passengers aboard the Tigress, another name has been added: Douglas Putnam Born in Ohio in 1838, Douglas Putnam was trained as clerk (financial industry) and departed his home near Marietta before 1860 to settle in Galena Illinois (where he became friends with William Rowley, who joined the 45th Illinois Infantry late in 1861). Shortly after outbreak of war, Putnam offered his services as “financial agent” and became part of financial agency “I. N. Cook,” handling large sums and making regular disbursement of pay to soldiers in the Volunteer Army [reference to I. N. Cook found in Papers of US Grant vol.5 pages 139 - 140.] Putnam (a civilian contractor with no rank) was sent to Cairo about August 1861, assigned the duty of Paymaster. It was while serving at Cairo through that Winter that Douglas Putnam became associated with Richard Oglesby, John McClernand, Flag-Officer Andrew Foote, and Brigadier General Ulysses S. Grant. Subsequent to General Grant’s victory at Fort Donelson, and likely due the increased number of Staff accorded the new Major General, Grant remembered Douglas Putnam, and brought him into his “military family” as Paymaster. When General Grant was released from arrest in mid-March 1862, Paymaster Putnam was installed in his own office aboard Tigress, and made the voyage to Savannah Tennessee, arriving on the 17th. During the remainder of March and early April, Douglas Putnam was present at numerous “pay parades” and disbursed funds to the soldiers camped at Pittsburg Landing. But, his pay activities were put on hold when fighting erupted Sunday, April 6th. And with the conclusion of the Battle of Shiloh on April 7th, Putnam made his way north aboard a steamer bound for Cincinnati. Back in Ohio, he became part of the drive to get up the 92nd Ohio Volunteer Infantry. Needing a character witness, Douglas Putnam requested one from Major General Grant… who gladly provided that document to Governor David Tod of Ohio. Putnam joined the 92nd OVI as “First Lieutenant and Adjutant,” but was soon elevated to Major. And at the Battle of Chickamauga, Lieutenant Colonel Putnam was wounded (and wounded again on Missionary Ridge.) Douglas Putnam survived the war, returned briefly to Ohio, and then settled in Kentucky, where he became a Director of the Ashland Coal and Iron Railway Company for the rest of his life. References: “Reminiscences of the Battle of Shiloh” by LtCol Douglas Putnam, Jr. (1889) found in pages 197 – 211 of MOLLUS (Ohio Commandery) vol.3 (1890). https://archive.org/details/sketcheswarhist00commgoog/page/n201 https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=coo1.ark:/13960/t15m6t13x;view=1up;seq=1093 Biography of Jay Cooke, financier of the Union war effort (begins page 1037 of Ohio in the War: her statesmen, her generals… by Whitelaw Reid (1868). http://www.cincinnaticwrt.org/data/ccwrt_history/talks_text/moffat_soldiers_pay.html Soldiers Pay [during the Civil War] by William C. Moffatt (1965) [presented to Civil War Round Table of Cincinnati January 1965.] https://www.kcchronicle.com/2014/03/11/a-look-into-a-civil-war-strongbox/a8nooaz/ Examination of 200-pound Paymasters Box (11 MAR 2014) by Brenda Schory. Papers of US Grant vol.5 pages 139 – 140: MGen Grant to Governor Tod. https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/93324038/douglas-putnam Paymaster Douglas Putnam.
  15. There are two pieces of communication (one constructed on April 5th, and the other generated on April 6th 1862) both of which are important in their own way to explain “how the Battle of Shiloh unfolded.” And both documents have "issues." The first item is a telegram constructed at St. Louis and sent under signature of Major General Henry Halleck on Saturday 5 April 1862. Fitting Halleck’s style of issuing concise orders, the two-line telegram begins by listing the recently promoted Major Generals by order of seniority: Buell, Pope, McClernand, C.F. Smith, Wallace. The inclusion of John Pope is significant because Major General Pope would soon join the Advance on Corinth. And the place held by John McClernand (ahead of Charles Ferguson Smith) may have come as a surprise to Major General Ulysses S. Grant… but no matter, as the late formal notice of MGen McClernand’s seniority did not provide opportunity to ‘Provide him with benefits of seniority to which he was entitled” i.e., the Shell Game played by Generals Grant, Smith, Sherman and Captain McMichael had worked perfectly; and now, at this late hour, McClernand would be notified in due course of his official seniority (likely after U.S. Grant established his HQ at Pittsburg Landing… When McClernand operating as “acting commander” had odds somewhere between Slim and None.) The second line of Halleck’s telegram reads: “You will act in concert [with General Buell] but he will exercise his separate command, unless the enemy should attack you. In that case you are authorized to take the general command.” The wording of this second line, giving Grant emergency authority over Buell in case of attack by Rebels, has significant implications. And yet, when the conduct of Day Two at Shiloh is closely examined, there is nothing more significant in regard to General Grant exercising command, than, “You take the left; and I’ll take the right” during the advance of Monday morning (coordination at its most minimal.) Which leads one to ponder: When did General Grant receive this telegram from Henry Halleck? If it was sent by telegraph from St. Louis late morning of April 5th, it likely arrived at the Fort Henry telegraph office before noon. If a steamer picked up the mail and telegraph traffic at 1 p.m., (perhaps the Minnehaha) then the 5 April telegram would arrive about midnight… plenty of time for Grant to read and understand the contents. But, at 2 p.m. on Sunday, April 6th, where was this telegram from Halleck? The cool indifference shared between Grant and Buell (with Buell simply left at the waterfront, while Grant headed away west to take care of business) does not represent “someone in possession of an important telegram, giving them extraordinary authority.” Instead, it seems to indicate General Grant has not yet received the telegram; or he has seen it… but left it behind at the Cherry Mansion. The second communication was constructed on Sunday morning by Captain A.S. Baxter, the AQM for Grant’s Army, as he rode the steamer Tigress north to relay Grant’s orders (likely relayed from Grant, through Captain John Rawlins, to Baxter.) Finding the orders complex and difficult to remember in detail, Captain Algernon Baxter scanned the floor of the Ladies’ Cabin, found a soiled bit of paper, and wrote the orders (as he best remembered them) onto that scrap (later recorded as “containing a heel mark and tobacco stain.”) Upon arrival at Crump’s Landing, Captain Baxter found Lieutenant Ross – Aide to Major General Wallace – waiting. The two rode away west and reported to MGen Wallace at, or just before 11:30 a.m. Captain Baxter presented General Wallace with the impromptu order; Wallace asked why it was not signed. Baxter explained he “created the memorandum, himself, out of fear he would “forget some detail” unless he did so.” General Wallace passed the “written order” to his Staff, and asked Baxter about the current state of affairs [Baxter left Pittsburg Landing between 10 and 10:30.] Captain Baxter replied, “We are driving them.” General Wallace was satisfied; Wallace’s staff officers were satisfied. The order was accepted, and Captain Baxter took his departure within three minutes of arrival at Stony Lonesome. Captain Frederick Kneffler, Lew Wallace’s AAG, wound up with the “written order.” He tucked it under his sword belt… and subsequently lost it. Ever since, the loss of that written order, or memorandum, has been significant because it would provide tangible proof of what Major General Wallace had been ordered to do. And, it is not difficult to envision the memorandum, jiggling loose from Captain Kneffler’s sword belt, and blowing away… to be beaten by heavy rain that night; ultimately washed into the Snake River, then Tennessee River… lost forever. But, paper was in short supply, always. Letters by soldiers were often written making use of every millimetre of space, including margins and borders. As likely as the memorandum being lost forever, it was just as likely noticed, clinging to trampled stubble, by some soldier… one of thousands following behind Kneffler on his horse. This soldier would have snatched it up, and possibly sent it as souvenir with his own letter, a few days later. My point: there is every chance that the Lew Wallace memorandum from Baxter still exists, contained in a box of Civil War letters and paraphernalia, and the owners have no idea what they have in their possession. But, with all the other material being revealed on a weekly basis, one day this piece of history might just surprise everyone, and re-emerge.
  16. Ozzy

    Baseball, anyone?

    Mona Thanks for the notice that Civil War-era ball will be played at Shiloh NMP this Memorial Day Weekend. Upon review of YouTube and google, it appears this style of "bat and ball" game returned to Pittsburg Landing in 2015 (although, just as occurred in 1862, no one bothered taking film imagery.) Hopefully, in 2019, someone will bring along a camera and snap a few non-lethal shots... In the meantime, here are a couple video links (to illustrate what is possible...) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uHVS3GGEaW4 A Brief History of Baseball posted 18 May 2014 by Paul Benoit. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D8AwvFkz6cM A Friendly Game, 1861-style posted 17 July 2015 by The Day. All the best Ozzy
  17. It appears baseball was played by General Grant's troops, during their abundant leisure time, after the victory at Fort Donelson. The game may have been introduced to regiments undergoing training at Benton Barracks. Alternatively, one or more of the regiments from Milwaukee, Chicago, or Ohio may have imported the game when they arrived at Pittsburg Landing in March 1862. It is confirmed that a baseball was discovered on Shiloh Battlefield, a few days after the carnage, by a civilian working for the Union army. G. F. Hellum was so impressed by his find, he etched details of the location of his discovery into the hide, turning the lemon-peel ball into a trophy. Now, consider the story of Sgt. Edward Spalding, Co. E, 52nd Illinois. In action on Sunday, the 6th of April, he was twice wounded, but refused to be removed from the field. He remained fighting, in open ground, until the close of the battle. Finally taken to Hospital at Pittsburg Landing in time to have wounds to his left arm dressed, he should have made a full recovery. But, days passed, and his condition worsened. Somehow, Ed Spalding's parents found out about their son's predicament; his father, Asa, journeyed to Pittsburg Landing and took him home, to Rockford, Illinois. The improvement in care, furnished in a loving home, probably saved his life. But, it still required time for his wounds to fully heal. While recuperating, he was visited by his 11-year-old cousin, Albert, to whom he introduced the rules of the game of Baseball. Edward returned to his regiment in November 1862, was promoted to second lieutenant, and continued to serve until mustered out in December 1864. Albert Spalding took to his cousin's game so well, that he went on to become a professional baseball player, playing as pitcher, centerfielder, and first baseman, for the Boston Red Stockings, and the Chicago White Stockings. In 1876, he co-founded A. G. Spalding Sporting Goods; he continued to promote 'the National Pastime' for the rest of his life.
  18. Sometimes "interesting information" hides in plain sight... When Manassas Belle posted the above information a few years ago, one particular and curious telegram escaped notice: the 3 APR 1862 telegram (9 p.m.) of Don Carlos Buell to Major General Henry Halleck, sent from the telegraph line that General Buell was stringing from Nashville while he marched the Army of the Ohio towards Savannah. The concerning bit of information is reference to Brigadier General Samuel D. Sturgis (who had spent his Civil War in Missouri, involved at Battle of Wilson's Creek (and given credit for safely withdrawing Union forces north after the death of General Lyon) and also involved in the failed relief of Lexington (which resulted in capture of Colonel Everett Peabody and the 13th Missouri Infantry.) In December of 1861, MGen Halleck (who replaced Fremont in November) sent Sturgis on a "Tour of Inspection, focusing on Federal Army posts along the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers" [according to S.D. Sturgis, USMA Class of 1846 entry on Cullum's Register.] And on March 5th 1862 General Sturgis found himself at Nashville (where he remained, "attached" to Buell's Department of the Ohio up through the time the telegram was sent on April 3rd.) Reading Buell's telegram, three likely scenarios present IRT Brigadier General Sturgis: Buell was dissatisfied with his performance, so left Sturgis behind at Nashville; Buell used the reference to Sturgis as opportunity to press for assignment of Brigadier General David S. Stanley USMA Class of 1852 (then with Pope at New Madrid) to Army of the Ohio, should that officer become available; Sturgis had been sent to Nashville by Henry Halleck, to act as liaison between Buell's Department and Halleck's Department. Why is the role of Samuel Sturgis important? It is known that Civil War telegraph communications were periodically intercepted, and so the most secure communication of sensitive information remained the courier, with that information delivered verbally, and not written down. Next best delivery system: "coded telegrams" (which if intercepted, the enemy could not read.) Given the nature of Halleck's operations (his trust of John Pope, and sharing of confidences with Don Carlos Buell, while NOT trusting Ulysses S. Grant) I believe it likely that General Sturgis operated as go-between, facilitating coded messages to pass between Generals Halleck and Buell, and allowing Major General Grant to be kept "out of the loop." I believe it also likely that "a special code" shared by only Halleck and Buell (delivered by Sturgis to Nashville) allowed passage of coded messages through Cairo, without fear of interception by friends of Grant or Sherman. As of the time of writing, the above is purely speculation. In any event, Brigadier General Sturgis departed Nashville on 10 April 1862. Reference: http://penelope.uchicago.edu/Thayer/E/Gazetteer/Places/America/United_States/Army/USMA/Cullums_Register/1303*.html
  19. Ozzy

    Corinth, interrupted...

    [Part three of Corinth, interrupted] Grant’s operation, with HQ at Savannah was kept on the back burner: just active enough to keep Rebel commanders guessing, but not sufficiently robust to allow General Grant to take the reins pre-emptively. The first benefit to Grant from success further west was assignment of Benjamin Prentiss to command of the newly created Sixth Division (although Halleck tasked Brigadier General Prentiss with other duties enroute, delaying his ultimate arrival at Pittsburg Landing.) In addition, Grant was aware that Don Carlos Buell was marching south and west to effect a join at Savannah (but Grant was frustrated by the slow pace of the Army of the Ohio.) Still, these troop additions were approved by Halleck, and were part of the overall plan to initiate the Operation against Corinth, in the proper sequence… after Victory at Island No.10 (when another source of manpower (Pope), as well as ammunition and abundant supplies would be made available.) References: SDG topics “Just supposin’ begun 26 FEB 2018 and “Full Hospitals” begun 30 JAN 2018 for Prentiss tasks enroute to Savannah Tennessee. SDG topic “Grant’s six divisions” begun 1 DEC 2018 details growth of Pittsburg force. OR 8 pages 633 – 4 telegram (23 MAR 1862) in which Henry Halleck lays out his “Programme” for SecWar Stanton, which includes, “Pope’s progress is necessarily slow,” and, “I have directed General Grant to make no move until Buell’s column (now at Columbia) can form junction with him.” Also, Halleck asserts, “We must take Corinth in order to seriously injure Rebel communications.” [And Halleck proposes possible moves for T.W. Sherman (the other Sherman) and Benjamin Butler which “might take advantage of [Bragg’s Army] leaving Florida and Alabama.”] OR 8 page 631 communication of 21 MAR 1862 from MGen Halleck to F/O Foote: “Everything is progressing well on the Tennessee River towards opening your way down the Mississippi.” [Illustrates the “connected” nature of Halleck’s operations, and alludes to the “proper sequence” of those operations.] OR 8 page 643 telegram from Army AG Thomas to MGen Halleck of 25 MAR 1862: “BGen Thomas Davies has been assigned duty in Department of the Mississippi.” [In preparation for conduct of operations after success at Island No.10 Halleck has called for more trained general officers to assist, as part of Halleck’s program. General Thomas Davies will be assigned command of Second Division, following deaths of WHL Wallace… and C.F. Smith.] OR 8 page 649 telegram SecWar Stanton to MGen Halleck of 29 MAR 1862: “You will report without delay the strength and distribution of your command.” [Halleck’s response 30 March: “Buell 101,000 in KY and Tenn; Grant 75,000 in Tennessee; Pope 25000 at New Madrid; Curtis 23000 in Arkansas; Strong 9000 District of Cairo; Steele 6000 in Arkansas; Schofield 15000 District of St. Louis (including new regiments at Benton Barracks); Totten 4000 in Central Missouri; Loan 2000 in Northern Missouri; about 10000 men in Kansas, Nebraska and Colorado.”] And follows telegram of Halleck to Stanton of 28 MAR 1862 revealing “elevated level of sickness experienced by men on Tennessee River expedition” (and lays blame on brigade and regimental surgeons of volunteers.) One-in-three reported sick, and is of concern because Halleck intends to make use of Grant’s Army… soon. OR 8 page 660 communication MGen Halleck to F/O Andrew Foote of 5 APR 1862: “I shall want a gunboat at Cairo ready to go up the Tennessee River in the early part of next week.” [With the successful run of USS Carondelet past the guns of Island No.10 on April 4th, Halleck knows it is “a matter of days” before Pope crosses his army and forces the trapped Rebels to surrender (in rear of Island No.10).] OR 8 page 661 communication Halleck to MGen Samuel Curtis (Army of the Southwest) on April 5th 1862: “Price and Van Dorn will soon leave your front [and the great battle of the war is to be fought on the Tennessee River.]” OR 8 page 672 telegram Halleck to Stanton of 7 APR 1862: “Buell’s advance force has reached Grant; entire force will connect in two or three days” [sent before news arrived at St. Louis IRT Battle of Shiloh initiated early 6 APR 1862.] OR 8 page 676 communication of 8 APR 1862 from Assistant Secretary of War Thomas Scott to Henry Halleck, alluding to “sequence of events” after Surrender of Island No.10.
  20. Ozzy

    Corinth, interrupted...

    From the Union standpoint, the Battle of Shiloh was not supposed to happen. Federal troops were sent south, under command of Brigadier General C.F. Smith, with intention of cutting rail lines and disrupting Rebel communications (between Fort Columbus and Corinth; and between Florence and Corinth.) Abundant Spring rain and effective Rebel defences (and M & O R.R. repair crews) curtailed railroad track disruption. Although an initial base of operations was sited at Union-friendly Savannah, Tennessee, the intention was to establish the Federal base much further south (between Hamburg and Florence) but the grossly swollen Tennessee River turned those prospective campgrounds into sodden, mosquito-infested marshes; and Pittsburg Landing was selected, by default (selected by Brigadier General William T. Sherman, and approved by General Smith.) The high plateau stretching west of the towering bluff overlooking – and out of reach of – the Tennessee River being the primary feature favouring selection of the site. It is said, “There is nothing more permanent than a temporary solution.” Major General U.S. Grant arrived at Savannah on March 17th 1862 and inspected the de facto campgrounds at Crump’s and Pittsburg established by his predecessor, and pronounced them sound. [Part two] With so many operations on his plate, Major General Henry Halleck did not have manpower or war materials in sufficient quantity to permit combat operations to take place concurrently. Priorities had to be determined from among operations taking place in Northern Missouri (Prentiss), SW Missouri (Curtis), SE Missouri (Pope), Island No.10 (Foote) and Savannah/ Pittsburg (Smith, replaced by Grant.) With North Missouri deemed “under control,” followed by Battle of Pea Ridge securing southern Missouri, manpower and ammunition was freed to be sent elsewhere. (Additional manpower was of no use at Island No.10 so those extra regiments went to General Grant, instead.) And with Henry Halleck’s elevation to Commander, Department of the Mississippi, another source of manpower eventuated: Buell’s Army of the Ohio, based in vicinity of Nashville. But, before U.S. Grant’s operation (with passage of time, confirmed to focus on Corinth) would be permitted to commence, the joint operation (Pope, at New Madrid and Foote, approaching Island No.10 from the north) would be given every opportunity to reach a successful conclusion. And General Grant was ordered, “Do nothing to bring on a general engagement.” References: SDG “Do you know Bragg?” post of 18 May 2018: Confederate Daniel Ruggles assigned to Post of Corinth on 9 March 1862 and begins construction of defences soon after. SDG “Jackson HQ” post of 5 May 2017: General Albert Sidney Johnston arrived at Corinth on March 24th, with concentration of Confederate troops (to this time strewn along the M & C R.R. and the M & O R.R.) gaining pace, and most everyone moves to Corinth. OR 10 (part 2) pages 11 – 12: Henry Halleck has information on March 6th that, “Beauregard has 20,000 men at Corinth.” Sherman reports similar concentration at “Eastport and Corinth” that same day. SDG “Not just pictures…” post of 5 July 2017: Report of Agate (Whitelaw Reid) dateline Savannah Tennessee on 1 April 1862, “There are rumors that General Halleck will take the field here, in person, soon as the Island No.10 agony is over. And there will be four or five corps [marching to Corinth] commanded by Major Generals Grant, Smith, Wallace, Buell and McClernand.”
  21. Ozzy

    Corinth, interrupted...

    Mona Your point is correct IRT ample fresh water available at Pittsburg Landing. In addition, water provided "defense," of sorts: swollen Snake Creek and Lick Creek provided impassable barriers, early on... natural moats. And Lew Wallace was likely maintained at Crump's Landing, both to keep him removed from interference with Brigadier General Sherman (as you have previously suggested), and to continue that sizable force at Crump's to act IAW Jomini as "Strategic Reserve" [Art of War pages 128 - 135.] Cheers Ozzy
  22. Ozzy

    Civil War in 4 Minutes

    Stumbled upon this site on YouTube by accident, and believe it to contain informative, well-researched general knowledge facts suitable for starting a discussion, or generating interest in a research project: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLZrhqv_T1O1vGjphtbnTVXpNpiFKUpVy8 Civil War in4 from Civil War Trust ( website civilwar.org). For our purposes here at SDG, the most interesting videos: Civil War Photography http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kDzYkygdJO8 Civil War Flags https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gnYRJ4SleEM Zouaves https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Zx5hqIdb-o Civil War Logistics https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ISDQGsdtvX4 General U.S. Grant https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=73WC1LHUGqQ Railroads https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ko3wexxTxjY The War in the West https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=40DZh5NXjC4 The Civil War Generation https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HRUFNBNYoPg In addition, Civil War Trust has expanded into videos of the American Revolution https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bmkK9Gx7fqw We're less than ten years from the 250th Anniversary of that momentous event, so a great opportunity presents to become re-familiar with aspects of that earlier conflict... four minutes at a time. Ozzy
  23. Ozzy

    Civil War in 4 Minutes

    The American Battlefield Trust has begun 2019 with a bang, publishing "Shiloh in 4 Minutes" on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ipNrAvDIO8U Post of 16 JAN 2019: Shiloh in 4 Featuring the narration and analysis of Dr. Timothy B. Smith, this fact-packed episode introduces Fraley Field; discusses the timing and drivers of Confederate movement north; General Grant trading space for time on Day One (with the arrival of Federal reinforcements making certain the outcome on Day Two.) It would be a challenge for anyone to do a better job of summarizing Battle of Shiloh. Bravo Zulu!
  24. Ozzy

    Unplanned delay at Savannah

    One of the "unexplained periods" of time involving General U.S. Grant in the hours leading up to Battle of Shiloh: "Where was the General after he left Pittsburg Landing, evening of Friday, April 4th (following his horse fall) until 3 p.m. on April 5th (recorded at Jacob Ammen's camp)?" Everything I have read is conjecture: Some suppose he visited Pittsburg Landing on Saturday morning; others claim that Grant "attempted to rest, but without much success, following his horse fall." There is evidence that General Grant's inspection of Prentiss' Sixth Division -- slated for April 5th -- was cancelled. And Colonel McPherson's work on the Snake Creek Bridge was suspended (and the Colonel directed to survey a campsite in vicinity of Hamburg for Don Carlos Buell's troops); but there is no evidence that Grant was in company with McPherson during that survey. During the period in question, where was General Grant?
  25. Ozzy

    Unplanned delay at Savannah

    There was a moment when this author entertained the thought that, “Perhaps General Grant intended for Rebels to attack his forces at Pittsburg Landing” [which would explain “no trenches or abatis” – used as bait; seemingly haphazard arrangement of camps at Pittsburg – bait, to lure the Rebels north; lack of extensive cavalry patrols (to avoid bringing on engagement, too far south, which would allow Rebels to fall back to formidable defences at Corinth); and cavalry patrols that were conducted, seemingly without any coordination with infantry pickets…] But, the more research is conducted, the more apparent becomes the fact: Ulysses S. Grant was caught by surprise. There was no intention; no “offering Federal troops as bait” to lure the Rebels north. The April 6 attack by Rebels upon Grant’s forces at Pittsburg Landing was unanticipated… at least, on April 6. Prior to that bloody Sunday [but, we get ahead of the story...] When Major General Grant arrived at Savannah Tennessee on 17 March 1862 (released from limbo, and returned to command in the field) he had every expectation of “conducting an operation against the Rebels, further south.” Pittsburg Landing and Crump’s Landing and Savannah were merely temporary sites, staging grounds for assembling and preparing the Federal force that would drive south (at the time and place of General Grant’s choosing.) But, initiation of that operation was anticipated to take place soon. (Sherman’s frequent raids and probes offered potential to initiate more robust offensive action, “requiring” substantial forces from Pittsburg Landing be rushed forward to assist Sherman. But no solid opportunity for increased engagement presented.) Therefore, Grant’s operation at Savannah, Crump’s, Pittsburg evolved over time into, “Wait for Buell.” But, as time dragged on, General Grant must have realized that, “He had been caught in a trap of his own making.” The situation on April 1st (as Sherman launched yet another raid) revealed Federal troops camped at uncoordinated sites (close proximity to fresh water deemed more important than mutual defense); no trenches or abatis; contrary to Jomini, his force was “on the wrong side of the river” (although use of Lew Wallace’s division as “grand reserve” offset this danger); and Grant’s own HQ was maintained at Savannah (for reasons not adequately explained.) With Rebel moves against Lew Wallace (about April 2nd) and the Picket Skirmish (April 4th) there would have been cause for concern. And Grant would have had time for reflection that, “he had occupied his time – an unexpectedly long time, as it turned out – focused on minutia.” And, there may have been “rising cause for concern” end of March/ early April, as Rebel probes became increasingly aggressive, and Buell remained remarkable for his lack of presence. The cloud would have lifted on April 3rd with the report by telegraph of Bull Nelson’s arrival at Waynesborough (allowing Grant to view the Picket Skirmish of April 4th through a rosy lens.) And, when Jacob Ammen and Bull Nelson appeared at Savannah on April 5th (with promise of the remainder of Army of the Ohio arriving in short order) any concerns held by General Grant would have evaporated. So confident became General Grant of his invincibility, that he joked with Jacob Ammen about “steamers taking him across the Tennessee River in a few days,” and directed Major General Buell not to hurry, but to report on April 6th. So confident became Major General Grant (in his apparent safety, and the impending operation against Corinth moving ahead) that he organized an “engagement” that took place Saturday afternoon (mentioned by Grant to Ammen, to which Brigadier General Ammen was not invited.) References: OR 10 pages 330 – 331 [Jacob Ammen’s diary.] SDG topic “Why Stay at Crumps?” 14 NOV 2017. Papers of US Grant vol.5 page 7 “Letter to Julia of 3 April 1862.” Papers of US Grant vol.5 page 6 “Telegraphic reply to BGen Nelson at Waynesborough.” Papers of US Grant vol.5 page 9 “4 APR 1862 instruction to BGen Sherman to be prepared to provide support to MGen Lew Wallace, if necessary.” Papers of US Grant vol.5 page12 “4 APR 1862 instruction to BGen WHL Wallace to be prepared to reinforce MGen Wallace, if necessary.” Papers of US Grant vol.5 page 13 “5 APR 1862 communication sent from Savannah to MGen Henry Halleck at St. Louis, advising arrival of advance of Buell’s Army, with reported strength of enemy at Corinth.” Papers of US Grant vol.5 page 16 “5 APR communication from Grant to Buell, advising ‘[Grant] will be hear April 6th to meet you.” [Sent in reply to Buell’s communication, found in Notes, top of page 17.]
×