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Ozzy

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Everything posted by Ozzy

  1. Picket Post in Trouble The Picket Post operated by Lt Herbert of the 70th OVI appears to have occupied a building near the lane leading to Gen. Meek's Place. This lane was reached by heading west from Pittsburg Campground across Owl Creek Bridge, follow the recently completed Shunpike to the intersection with the Purdy Road, and proceed west along the Purdy Road a further half mile to the junction with the lane to Gen. Meek's (follow the left fork.) It is believed the 70th OVI Picket Post was sited in this vicinity four miles west of Shiloh Church. [And for comparison, Captain Walden's Company D of 6th Iowa operated a Picket Post on the Shunpike in vicinity of the Western approach to Owl Creek Bridge, perhaps a mile or so east of Lieutenant Herbert's picket post.] On Friday 4 April between 2 – 2:30 pm Colonel Buckland and an aide were riding west along the Shunpike to inspect drill being conducted by a battalion of the 72nd OVI supervised by Major Crockett. Hearing gunfire from the direction of Herbert's Picket Post, Colonel Buckland continued to the drill field, ordered Major Crockett to suspend training, and march Companies B and H back to camp, via a detour to investigate the occurrence at the picket post. Upon arrival, there was found blood and disorder, evidence of a fight, but no men. Buckland's aide, Lieutenant Geer, was sent back to camp to inform Colonel Cockerill (whose 70th Ohio had lost the picket post) and order him to bring sufficient men forward; and to report the loss of the picket post to General Sherman. Geer departed; and Buckland and Crockett continued their investigation and deliberation. At about 3:30 J.J. Geer returned from his duty as courier, and made his report to Colonel Buckland; and Buckland retracted his previous order to “Return to camp,” and gave instructions to Major Crockett to “establish a skirmish line in the vicinity” and to continue investigating the fate of the missing men (and try to determine in what direction the Rebel cavalry, obviously responsible for the disaster, had carried away their captives.) And with that, Colonel Buckland took his departure and rode back to camp, and determined how best to take control of the situation. References: OR 10 pages 90 – 92: Buckland's report. OR 10 pages 89 – 90: Sherman's report. SDG topic “General Meek's Place” (for Atwell Thompson map of location).
  2. Ozzy

    General Meek's Place

    Brigadier General W. T. Sherman in his report of 5 April 1862 includes the following: “The enemy is in some considerable force at Pea Ridge... they halted infantry and artillery at a point about five miles in my front, and sent a detachment [of cavalry] to the lane of General Meeks, on the north of Owl Creek... This cavalry captured a part of our advance pickets...” [This is why knowing the location of General Meek's Place is important.]
  3. Colonel Isaac Pugh At the start of this topic, I made mention how Colonel Isaac Pugh had only four hits on SDG (from people seeking information about him and his Shiloh service.) In the intervening years, a quirk of Fate (and necessity to research the 3rd Iowa Infantry) has brought Isaac Pugh into sharper focus for me; and his is a story deserving to be told. Born in Kentucky in 1805, but growing up in Illinois, Isaac Pugh moved to Decatur (a town just east of the Illinois capital, Springfield) as a young man in order to start a business; and over time became Postmaster, Master of Chancery (a branch of Law that dealt with estates and administration of trusts), and served as County Commissioner. Along the way, Postmaster Pugh served in the Black Hawk War; and saw action during the 1846 – 7 War with Mexico (Vera Cruz and Cerro Gordo.) With the eruption of hostilities at Fort Sumter, Isaac Pugh felt the call to serve, once again, and helped to raise the 41st Illinois Volunteer Infantry at Decatur in July and August 1861. Initially posted to Cairo, Colonel Pugh and his 41st Illinois were on hand when Grant occupied Paducah in September; and engaged in a feint during Grant's Battle of Belmont. The 41st Illinois was on hand for the operation against Fort Henry (C. F. Smith's Division assault on Fort Heiman); and was part of Colonel McArthur's unfortunately placed brigade during the operation against Fort Donelson. A quirk of Fate (creation of Hurlbut's Fourth Division) resulted in Pugh's 41st Illinois being removed from McArthur, and installed in the new division's 1st Brigade (commanded by William Nelson of the 3rd Iowa, USMA 1843 classmate of US Grant who left West Point after his Plebe year.) Pugh's Illinois regiment was the first of C. F. Smith's Expedition to land and establish Pittsburg Landing as its campground. During the Battle of Shiloh, while serving alongside the 28th Illinois, 32nd Illinois and 3rd Iowa, Colonel Nelson was disabled; and Colonel Pugh assumed command of the brigade (the first of many such temporary “field promotions” enjoyed by Isaac Pugh.) But beginning with Shiloh, the 3rd Iowa and the 41st Illinois became sister regiments, serving together on every subsequent field (and usually under command of Brigadier General Jacob Lauman) which included the Crawl to Corinth; Battle at Hatchie's Bridge; Vicksburg Campaign; and Battle of Second Jackson. But, as well as experiencing important aspects of General US Grant's career as Civil War leader, the 41st Illinois (and 3rd Iowa) benefited from having astute observers in the ranks, able to document what they saw and experienced. [SDG member Tim Jeffers is putting together the “Bloody Third” Iowa narrative of that story.] For the 41st Illinois, the no-nonsense reporter was Colonel Isaac Pugh, in his Official Reports... and in over 100 letters written during his military service. Which is the main reason why this post is here: to inform SDG members of the existence of the Depository of Letters of Colonel Isaac Pugh, Special Collections, University of California. https://oac.cdlib.org/findaid/ark:/13030/kt696nf07x/entire_text/ Letters of Colonel Isaac Pugh at University of California.
  4. George H. Thomas, the authorized biography What I believe to be the “best book” on General George H. Thomas is actually a trilogy: the General admonished his biographer to write the History of his Army first; and then devote "whatever energy was yet needed" to compiling his biography. So Thomas B. Van Horne wrote the two volume (950 pages) “History of the Army of the Cumberland” (published 1875) and “The Life of Major General George H. Thomas” went to print in 1882. Both works were published after General Thomas' death in 1870. Naturally, I began reading “The Life of Major General Thomas” first... but although interesting and moderately detailed, it felt “incomplete.” [The Battle of Shiloh was accorded only one paragraph.] So I put that work aside and commenced “History of the Army of the Cumberland,” and came to an unexpected realization: General Thomas wanted the History of his Army to be the history of him. And the Biography generated by Thomas Van Horne was created primarily to act as “clean-up,” addressing any material not covered in two volumes of Army of the Cumberland. The strategy works; but it is a LOT of material to cover and process: over 1500 pages. A good feel is gained of General Thomas and what became his Army after about 200 pages; and the degree of interconnected development continues to build and progress, until George Thomas and the Army of the Cumberland become one. Everything one could hope for is addressed through these three volumes (although, as in the case of Thomas' relationship with U.S. Grant, that requires compiling facts dispersed throughout the three-volume work.) And the revelation that General Thomas kept Personal Journals (provided to Thomas Van Horne for creation of these works) adds an extra level of authority to the story of the General and His Army. All three volumes are available at archive.org (links below): https://archive.org/details/historyofarmyofc01vanh/page/n11/mode/1up History of Army of the Cumberland, Vol.1 https://archive.org/details/historyofarmyofc02vanh/page/n6/mode/2up History of Army of the Cumberland, Vol.2 https://archive.org/details/lifemajorgenera00horngoog/page/n8/mode/2up Life of Major General George H. Thomas https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/21327077/thomas-budd-van_horne Chaplain Van Horne at find-a-grave
  5. "Summarized to the point of being Unrecognizable" In his otherwise excellent Battle of Shiloh and the Organizations Engaged (1902) Major D. W. Reed's summary of the Picket Skirmish (on page 13): “During the Confederate advance from Monterey on the 3rd there had been skirmishing between the cavalry of the two armies, and on the 4th [of April] one of Buckland's picket posts was captured. Buckland sent out two companies in pursuit of the captors. These companies were attacked and surrounded by Confederate cavalry, but were rescued by Buckland coming to their relief with his whole regiment.” The above condensed version of events leaves readers with a false sense of 1) what units were involved; 2) how long the emergency of April 4th persisted; and 3) where this Picket Skirmish took place. Subsequent posts will attempt to rectify this lack of clarity. Ozzy
  6. Ozzy

    General Meek's Place

    The above map by Atwell Thompson was created in 1901 and can be found in the back of early editions of Major D. W. Reed's "Battle of Shiloh and the Organizations Engaged." Positive attributes of this map include: shows accurate location of Wallace Bridge over Snake Creek; shows accurate relationship of Tilghman Branch with Owl Creek; shows the route of the Shunpike; shows the route of the Adamsville - Corinth Road; shows the location of Confederate rendezvous (Mickey's); indicates the location of Owl Creek Bridge (on Hamburg and Purdy Road.) And it is one of the few maps that shows Falcon Tennessee and the location of General Meek's Place. The main shortcoming: it does not indicate Dill Branch.
  7. General John H. Meeks Said to have been “twelve miles east of Falcon, Tennessee” ...what significance was “General Meek's Place” to the Picket Skirmish of April 4th 1862? Bonus: Where was General Meek's Place in rough cardinal direction and distance from Shiloh Church? Added Bonus: Why was John Henderson Meeks called "General" Meeks? Note: Above likeness found on Google Images.
  8. Two key players in the Picket Skirmish 4 April 1862 There were two men intimately caught up in the Picket Skirmish of 4 April 1862 who, despite direct involvement somehow get little mention by historians. The first of these is James H. Clanton. Born in Georgia in 1827, Clanton migrated to the State bordering on the west with his family as a child, attended the University of Alabama, but suspended his studies in order to participate in the War with Mexico. The military veteran returned to Alabama in 1847, studied law, and passed the bar and by 1850 was living and practising in Montgomery. Gravitating towards politics, James Clanton served in the Alabama State Legislature in 1855 and was involved in the Presidential Election of 1860 (as supporter of John Bell and the Constitutional Union coalition.) Following the November election, and subsequent eruption of the Secession movement, James Clanton organized a company of horsemen and in early 1861 rode to the Florida coast (where a protracted standoff involving Federal occupation of Fort Pickens denied Southern control of Pensacola Harbor.) Captain Clanton's Company was joined over subsequent months by other horse enthusiasts; but in a location requiring infantrymen and artillerists, there was not much to occupy cavalry on the white sand beaches except to act as orderlies for senior officers; act as mounted pickets and conduct patrols; and perform courier duties (Major General Bragg's district initially stretched from Pensacola City west to the Navy Yard, Fort Barrancas and Fort McRee, a distance of twenty miles; and over time that territory extended one hundred miles west to include Mobile.) And over time, the growing number of independent cavalry companies in Bragg's Department of the Gulf led to their amalgamation, and creation of the First Alabama Cavalry, with James Clanton elected as Colonel. The relatively relaxed assignment on the Gulf Coast came to an abrupt end with the arrival of news that Fort Donelson had fallen. Bragg's Army of Pensacola was ordered north; and Clanton's Alabama Cavalry found itself in Corinth Mississippi. And appears to have been assigned patrol of territory extending north from Corinth. When the decision was taken in early April to march Johnston's Army north, Clanton's Cavalry was already familiar with Pea Ridge and Monterey; and loosely assigned to Brigadier General James Chalmers, the cavalry outfit extended its reach further north, northeast, northwest... screening the advance... approaching to within pistol distance of the sprawling Union encampment supplied from Pittsburg Landing. Safe houses with welcoming locals were identified, and some of those safe houses acted as base of operations for daily patrols. Unbeknownst to Clanton's Cavalry, at least two of those safe houses were detected, and subsequently surveilled by Union scouts. And that unwitting detection led to an operation launched pre-dawn of April 3rd in an attempt by Federal cavalry to surprise Rebel cavalry at a safe house, and scare it away to the east... into an ambush mounted by companies belonging to the 54th Ohio. The attempted ambush failed because the horsemen rode away to the northwest, instead. But the Federal operation bagged one wounded horseman; and one captured. And Colonel Clanton made his report in person to BGen James Chalmers. The other man deserving of discussion is Leroy Crockett of "New York." Born in 1831 in Ohio, Crockett was raised on a farm; and as a young man went to work in grain buying and storage. With eruption of War due to Rebel attack on Fort Sumter, Leroy Crockett joined a military unit that promised “honor, prestige, and a good-looking uniform,” the 1st U.S. Chasseurs of New York. Mustered into the unit (also known as 65th New York Infantry) the men performed drill in their distinctive, French-inspired uniform until a high proficiency had been achieved... and then were called south for duty protecting the National Capital, where they arrived in August, not long after the embarrassment of Bull Run. A battalion of the Chasseurs saw action during the September 11, 1861 Battle of Lewinsville; and the regiment is recorded as involved with the October 1861 Reconnaissance to Lewinsville (but it is unknown, at this time, whether First Lieutenant Crockett was present at either, neither or both, of those engagements. Regardless, he knew military drill and basic infantry tactics (according to Hardee.) The 72nd Ohio Volunteer Infantry was recruited during OCT/ November 1861 and had Ralph Buckland as Colonel and Herman Canfield as LtCol; and neither man knew military drill. When the man tentatively selected as Major decided to withdraw his name from consideration, Colonel Buckland seized the opportunity and poached Lieutenant Crockett from the New York unit, and installed him in the 72nd OVI as Major on 26 NOV 1861. Records at the time indicate Major Crockett “was a strict, stern disciplinarian; and he took military drill seriously. But, it was also acknowledged that the Major exhibited a fine balance of care and concern for the welfare of soldiers under his charge, making sure they had adequate provisions and shelter. His men may not have loved him; but they respected him” [extract of a recollection of then-Captain John Lemmon 72nd OVI.] References: https://archive.org/details/alabamaherhisto00brewgoog/page/n684/mode/1up Brewer pp.677, 475 Party Politics in Alabama, 1850 – 1860 by Lewy Dorman (2014) pp.202 -204. The Struggle for Pensacola, 1860 – 1862 by Mike Maxwell (2020) Appendix One. OR 10 pp.86 – 87. Reports of Taylor and Chalmers. https://www.nps.gov/civilwar/search-soldiers-detail.htm?soldierId=B45C3A8D-DC7A-DF11-BF36-B8AC6F5D926A James Clanton's entry at NPS site. Clanton's Alabama Cavalry https://www.nps.gov/civilwar/search-battle-units-detail.htm?battleUnitCode=CAL0001RC POW Prison Record for Madison Georgia, 1861 – 1865. https://www.rbhayes.org/collection-items/local-history-collections/crockett-leroy-colonel/ bio and list of letters sent and received by Union army officer Leroy Crockett, 72nd OVI. http://dan-masters-civil-war.blogspot.com/2018/06/honoring-lieutenant-colonel-leroy.html bio. 72nd OVI history. https://www.ohiocivilwarcentral.com/entry.php?rec=1136 https://www.nytimes.com/1861/09/02/archives/letter-from-the-first-united-states-chasseurs.html Cincinnati Daily Press 15 SEP 1861 page 1 col.4 “The Fight at Lewinsville” details action of 1st U.S. Chasseurs at Lewinsville near Washington, D.C. on 11 SEP 1861 https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84028745/1861-09-15/ed-1/seq-1/#date1=1861&sort=date&rows=20&words=Chasseurs&searchType=basic&sequence=0&index=12&state=Ohio&date2=1861&proxtext=Chasseur&y=0&x=0&dateFilterType=yearRange&page=1 Another Chasseur/ Battle of Lewinsville connection https://sites.google.com/site/wppricememoir/home/1861---1865-the-war-years/1861-battle-of-lewinsville from 1905 Dahlonega Nugget. Major Crockett's record of muster with 72nd OVI on 26 NOV 61 https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=uiug.30112047586026&view=1up&seq=95 Ohio Regimental Rosters vol.6 https://dmna.ny.gov/historic/reghist/civil/rosters/Infantry/65th_Infantry_CW_Roster.pdf Original muster in with 1st U.S. Chasseurs (65th NY Inf) on 15 July 1861 (page 491). https://www.nps.gov/civilwar/search-soldiers-detail.htm?soldierId=5942EB91-DC7A-DF11-BF36-B8AC6F5D926A Leroy Crockett's entry at NPS site.
  9. "Colonel Peabody and our 25th Missouri" As we know, the Engineer Everett Peabody was based at St. Joseph Missouri while building the Hannibal & St. Joseph Railroad; and the 25th Missouri was considered by Union men residing in St. Joseph as “their” regiment. The St. Joseph Herald followed the career of Colonel Peabody with interest, and beginning with the edition published Friday 11 April 1862 contained news of the Colonel and his 25th Missouri in columns 1, 4, 5 & 6 on Page 2; and column one on Page 3. At this time, in the first Shiloh reports received in Western Missouri, and indicated by the multiple reports, Everett Peabody was listed among the “wounded.” https://digital.shsmo.org/digital/collection/stjoemh/id/251/rec/51 The edition of Saturday 12 April contains more details: Page 2 columns 4 and 5 (but still no word on fate of Colonel Peabody.) https://digital.shsmo.org/digital/collection/stjoemh/id/257/rec/52 Sunday 13 April has a third full-length article IRT Battle of Pittsburg Landing on page 3 columns 4 and 5. (But no mention of Peabody or the 25th Missouri.) https://digital.shsmo.org/digital/collection/stjoemh/id/262/rec/53 [There was no regular Monday edition of the St. Joseph Herald.] The Tuesday 15 April edition Page 3 columns 4 and 5 provides details of the wounded being moved north from the battlefield. General Ormsby Mitchel took Huntsville (and cut the M & C R.R.) A Southern version of the Battle of Shiloh is published (from the Richmond WHIG.) https://digital.shsmo.org/digital/collection/stjoemh/id/267/rec/54 Wednesday 16 April finds Pittsburg Landing, and details of Colonel Peabody, Column one page 2. Below Peabody's Obituary is on for Colonel Tyndale, late of the 23rd Missouri (and killed at the Hornet's Nest.) Page 3 columns 4 and 5 presents another full battle depiction; Col. Peabody confirmed killed; and details how General Grant's Shiloh report was hand-delivered to St. Louis. https://digital.shsmo.org/digital/collection/stjoemh/id/271/rec/55 Thursday 17 April page 2 column 5 two articles cover Col. Peabody's death and funeral (and the remaining members of the 25th Missouri gain a mention under “Local Intelligence.”) Page 3 columns 4 and 5 give more details of the battle and its aftermath. https://digital.shsmo.org/digital/collection/stjoemh/id/276/rec/56 and https://digital.shsmo.org/digital/collection/stjoemh/id/276/rec/56 Friday 18 April page 2 column 6 gives details of Peabody, Prentiss and Powell early Sunday morning 6 April 1862. Page 3 columns 4 and 5 gives more details of 25th Missouri in action at Pittsburg Landing. https://digital.shsmo.org/digital/collection/stjoemh/id/281/rec/57 Saturday 19 April page 2 column 2 gives details of Colonel Moore and the 21st Missouri. Page 3 column 5 provides an update on “the 500 soldiers remaining of the 25th Missouri.” https://digital.shsmo.org/digital/collection/stjoemh/id/286/rec/58
  10. Ozzy

    See you in Memphis

    Heady Day 23 June 1862 was a banner day for Ulysses S. Grant. He had solved his “Lew Wallace problem” with that man's departure... at his own request. The only real thorn remaining to irritate Major General Grant was Major General John A. McClernand; but with patience, and the arrival of fortuitous opportunity, perhaps that thorn could be removed, soon, as well. Ulysses Grant as senior officer in the former Rebel Capital of Tennessee anticipated the pending arrival of wife, Julia; and in meantime would take steps to revoke Wallace's draconian measures, especially IRT newspaper suppression and the rights of citizens of Memphis and the correct interaction of Federal troops with those citizens: IAW General Orders No.56 issued under signature of AAG John Rawlins shortly after Grant's arrival, “[Federal soldiers] are forbidden to trespass upon the orchards, gardens or private grounds of any citizen of Memphis without express written authority [of Major General Grant].” Colonel Joseph Webster was appointed Commander of the Post of Memphis; Colonel Slack was ordered to take his force “to the east of Memphis and encamp with his Garrison of Memphis there.” Colonel William S. Hillyer (ADC to MGen Grant) was assigned as Provost Marshal General for the District of Memphis. “All the troops in Memphis not belonging to Colonel Slack's command (i.e. Wallace's old Third Division, now under command of BGen Alvin Hovey) are directed to immediately go into camp outside of the City on the line of the railroad to Grenada Mississippi; they will picket all the roads leading into Memphis from the southeast...” With basic security and adequate defences in place (and relations with local citizens ameliorated) Major General Grant could kick back and enjoy welcome break from the routine of “Second-in-command of Halleck's Approach to Corinth.” References: Papers of U.S. Grant vol.5 pages 150 – 153; and page 130. Note: In a Letter to wife, Julia dated 24 May 1862 and sent from north of Corinth, Major General Grant wrote: "I have written to you to join me whenever you hear of my being on the Mississippi River."
  11. Ozzy

    See you in Memphis

    Gallop Part Six (Lew Wallace and U.S. Grant in Memphis) US Grant later reported that he arrived in Memphis, set up his HQ and waited (expecting Wallace to visit him in recognition of Grant's “senior commander” status) but Wallace did not come. So Grant went to see Wallace. For this meeting of Major General Grant with Major General Lew Wallace... it would have been interesting to have been a fly on the wall and overheard the actual conversation (and this writer suspects that it was similar in tone to a conversation likely to have been conducted between Grant and Brigadier General Benjamin Prentiss which took place at Savannah Tennessee on March 31 or April 1st 1862.) From what details were recorded: Grant appears to have expressed displeasure with Wallace's lack of subjugation (lack of acknowledgement of Major General Grant's status as senior officer) Grant confronted Wallace with his “lack of authority to enter Memphis” Grant asserted “NO reports had been sent to Halleck” (OR 17 part 2 page 26). And Grant relayed Halleck's insistence that Wallace had NO authority to be in Memphis; and demanded an explanation: “Why are you here?” Grant countered Wallace's attempted explanation: “There is NO enemy south of Memphis” (page 13). Grant demanded a roster of the Third Division (and complained it took too long for Wallace to comply with its production) Wallace may have suffered nervous breakdown: he was bombarded with demands for troop rosters; informed that “none of his communications had reached Halleck,” the “enemy to his south was a figment of his own imagination” and the former command structure of Left Wing, Right Wing, Center and Reserve used against Corinth had been broken up: Wallace was effectively working for General Grant again... and had been since June 10th (see OR 17 (part 2) page 3.) Yet, Wallace had not been sending reports to Major General Grant... The District of West Tennessee was reiterated on 12 June 1862 via General Orders No.33 (see OR 17 (part 2) page 7.) [Of interest: the end of the telegraph line running from Pittsburg Landing to Halleck's HQ was in close proximity to Major General Grant's tent during the Operation against Corinth. And on 14 June 1862 Halleck in a communication with General Pope, stated, “I have been confined to my tent for several days with, 'the Evacuation of Corinth' [alluding to a medical condition] see page 9 of OR 17 (part two). This would have given Grant or Rawlins opportunity to intercept messages from Lew Wallace, and perhaps “hold onto them for a while.” ] Wallace requested Leave effective that day 23 June. (Grant allowed two weeks Leave.) Grant later reported to Halleck on 24 June 1862: “Wallace has been given Leave, which he requested.” Hovey is in command of the Third Division. “I need more men: the current number at Memphis is not enough with Rebels in vicinity (so Grant would request another division be added to the current force of about 4000)” Church leaders need to omit “pro-Secession remarks” from sermons. Aftermath of Lew Wallace's departure from Memphis: [The Third Division soon ceased to exist as an organized fighting force. Bits were detached and sent elsewhere; but the 47th Indiana of Colonel Slack was incorporated into an organization (under Alvin Hovey) that became known as the 12th Division (see Order of Battle for Vicksburg).] A NEW Third Division was subsequently created in January 1863, incorporating regiments that had fought at Shiloh, and under the command of BGen John A. Logan. Because of the above restructure, there was “no Third Division” for Lew Wallace to return to (should he press his case for return to his former command.) On 22 June 1862 Major General Sherman sent a train east along the Memphis & Charleston towards Corinth a day ahead of schedule in order to test the rebuilt line. At La Fayette Station the train was derailed; and the occupants attacked. The Colonel of the 56th Ohio Infantry and two dozen of his men were captured by Rebel cavalry belonging to W. H. Jackson's 1st Tennessee Cavalry... It was the first of an ongoing series of raids “by Rebels who were nowhere near” against the M & C Railroad that effectively stopped direct Federal operations between Memphis and Corinth (resulting in re-routing of rail traffic Northeast from Memphis to the junction with the Mobile & Ohio R.R. at Humboldt; change trains; and continue south at a snail's pace in order to reach Corinth (which remained in danger of being isolated until December 1862.) Colonel Grierson of the 6th Illinois Cavalry returned to Memphis from his expedition south into Mississippi [see OR 17 (part 1) pages 9 – 10]. Grierson reported that his 315 men rode south to Hernando, 25 miles away, and entered the town at 5 am ...and encountered no one: M. Jeff. Thompson had moved his force twelve miles away to Coldwater. Grierson hurried south to Coldwater Station, just missed the train full of Rebels steaming south, and attacked the Confederate force left at the station (causing 19 casualties to the Rebels). Subsequently learning that a cavalry force of 800 Rebels was on its way to Coldwater from Yalabusha, Colonel Grierson destroyed everything of use to the Rebels at Coldwater Station: “We started our return, and camped three miles north of Hernando that night. My pickets exchanged fire with the enemy during the night; and in the morning we continued our trek north and arrived back at Memphis at 1 pm on June 22nd (Lew Wallace does not appear to have received this report; it was likely received by the new Commander in Memphis: MGen Grant.) And Lew Wallace was detached from the Army of West Tennessee, never to return. References: OR 17 (part 2) pages 3 – 26. OR 17 (part 1) pages 10 – 12. Papers of US Grant vol.5 pages 148 – 151. Map shows line of Memphis & Ohio to Humboldt (change trains) continue south on Mobile & Ohio to reach Corinth from Memphis from July 1862.
  12. Ozzy

    Whitelaw Reid

    Every Whitelaw Reid article during period FEB - APR 1862 Below is a list of articles written by "Agate, Special Correspondent Cincinnati Gazette" and sent to the Cincinnati Gazette for publication. Due to contract agreements, these articles also appeared in other newspapers with connections to the Gazette, such as Cleveland Morning Leader; Gallipolis Journal; Evansville Daily Journal. It is apparent that Whitelaw Reid joined Brigadier General C. F. Smith at Clarksville in February 1862; rode in company with him aboard a steamer up the Tennessee River to Savannah in March; and accompanied Brigadier General W. T. Sherman on at least one attempt to break the M & C Railroad. 27 FEB [“Clarksville” via Cairo] pub. Evansville Daily Journal 1 MAR pg.3 col.4. “Several of our divisions are in Nashville (Reid seems to have received info from US Grant or someone in company with General Grant, returning to Clarksville from Nashville...)” 5 MAR [ Clarksville ] pub. in Evansville Daily Journal 5 MAR pg.3 col.5 “Agate reports: Citizens at Clarksville gave Floyd and Pillow a good reception as they headed for Fort Donelson; not so impressed with their untimely departure back to Nashville...” [Agate would have been with BGen Smith at Clarksville; and likely accompanied him up river to Savannah Tennessee.] https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015672/issues/1862/ 6 MAR [Clarksville ] (likely Agate) pub. In Evansville Daily Journal 6 MAR pg.2 col.2 “Captain Wm. McMichael, late of Halleck's staff, has arrived here for duty on BGen Smith's staff. He is the son of Morton McMichael, newspaper publisher of Philadelphia." 15 MAR [Tyler's Landing, Tishomingo Co., Mississippi] pub. Gallipolis Journal 27 MAR 62. Article relates Whitelaw Reid's experience with W T Sherman up the Tennessee in attempt to break the M & C R.R. Via fleet of transports in heavy rain (failed.) 16 MAR [Pittsburg Tennessee] pub. Gallipolis Journal 27 MAR pg.3 col.1. “Arrived here overnight 15/ 16 March after failed attempt against M & C R.R. Met officers of 71st OVI during the operation. 'We united here with Hurlbut's Division.' [Note: US Grant does not arrive until 17 MAR.] 27 MAR [Savannah ] pub. Gallipolis Journal 3 APR pg.2 col.5 - 6 “A grand battle is pending...” https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85038121/issues/1862/ 30 MAR [Savannah] pub Evansville Daily Journal 7 APR pg.3 col.5 Agate provides a paragraph of ongoing naval operations and estimates number of rebels in vicinity 30 MAR [Savannah] pub Evansville Daily Journal 7 APR pg.2 col.2 Agate provides bad press IRT Surgeon Hewitt: “ Grant's medical director, and the most unfit man for the role one can imagine.” 1 APR [Savannah Tennessee] pub. Cleveland Morning Leader 4 APR pg.2 col.3. “The Rebels are only five miles west of our force at Crump's and six miles south of our camps at Pittsburg. Accurate details of enemy to south at Corinth; and Buell approaching from Nashville; and Halleck to arrive soon as Island No. 10 “agony” is over and turn Grant's Army into 4 or 5 Army Corps and march on Corinth...” 9 APR [Pittsburg Landing via Cairo ] pub. Sacramento Daily Union 21 May 1862 pages 2 - 3. Agates 22000 words describing the Battle of Shiloh, or Pittsburg Landing: http://cdnc.ucr.edu/cgi-bin/cdnc?a=d&d=SDU18620521&e=-------en--20--1--txt-txIN--------1 "The Great Battle of Pittsburg Landing" by Agate. Note: There were no articles published by Agate from 6 - 15 March because he had no way of getting his reports north from Savannah Tennessee for about a week. Whitelaw Reid spent substantial time at Savannah, Pittsburg Landing and Crump's Landing in the weeks prior to 6 APR 1862 and departed evening of April 7th on a northbound steamer (and after publishing his report on the Battle of Shiloh, he returned to Pittsburg Landing and joined thirty newspaper reporters for the Crawl to Corinth.)
  13. Ozzy

    Who am I?

    Well Done, Rbn3! In November 1864, following reelection of Abraham Lincoln as President, a pre-planned operation to burn down New York City commenced in the evening of November 25th: nearly two dozen fires initiated through use of the chemical, Greek fire, were set in hotels and other businesses across the city. Unfortunately for the eight Confederate operatives, the Greek fire required air as well as fuel and doors to rooms were closed instead of blocked open... and the fire in almost every case burned out before causing serious damage. The one verified success was at P. T. Barnum's American Museum, which was gutted. [Barnum took his show on the road after the Civil War and became involved in one of America's most successful circuses.] But success at Barnum's Museum cost Confederate clandestine operative Kennedy his life. The Attack on New York was just one of many operations during the Civil War that involved irregular warfare: the North had the Great Locomotive Race and Dahlgren's Raid; the South attempted Prison breakouts (Camp Douglas and Elmira) and Johnson's Island (which involved the use of commandeered Great Lake vessels) the Raid at St. Albans, the use of virus-infected clothing to spread disease... The Civil War possessed a lot more facets than most folks realize [see link for more.] https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/intelligence-history/civil-war/Intel_in_the_CW1.pdf Clandestine Operations during the Civil War.
  14. Soldier- Reporter of the 72nd Ohio The following report appeared in the Fremont Ohio Journal of 2 May 1862 on page one col.5 - 6 and was submitted by a member of the 72nd Ohio (Buckland's Brigade) who apologizes for the lateness of his report; but believing “the incorrect record of Shiloh as it had appeared in the papers to date needed to be addressed,” Seventy-Six (as he calls himself) reveals a stinging criticism of “Federal leaders” who allowed themselves to be taken by surprise (without mentioning names.) The contact with Rebel patrols in days prior; the statements of captured Rebels; and this man's own experience during Days One and Two all gain mention in course of the report. [And Buell's Army of the Ohio gets credit for grasping Victory from the jaws of Defeat.] [Return to TOP of post for conclusion of article.]
  15. Ozzy

    Who am I?

    The attached article, "Famous Trials: the Summation of the Honorable John Bingham," contains the name of the subject of this quiz question (and also contains names of other Shiloh veterans who were caught up in Confederate clandestine operations, either as operatives or intended victims.) https://famous-trials.com/lincoln/2174-binghamclose by Professor Douglas O. Linder.
  16. As mentioned previously, John Fremont (promoted to Major General at start of the Civil War) was in Europe procuring small arms, artillery and cavalry equipment in April 1861 and is responsible for equipping Midwestern regiments – many of which fought at Shiloh – with modern equipment. On return to New York and Washington, Fremont debriefed President Lincoln and then set off for St. Louis, where he enjoyed a good working relationship with Brigadier General Nathaniel Lyon (until that man's death at Wilson's Creek in August 1861.) During his tenure as Commander, Department of the West, MGen Fremont constructed the defences that encircled St. Louis; extended the telegraph to the end of all Missouri railroad lines; initiated the Camp of Instruction at Benton Barracks; contracted for “Pook ironclads” and initiated a Corps of Telegraph Operators, and a Corps of Intelligence Collectors known as Jessie Scouts. He also managed to defuse a tense situation that erupted between Brigadier Generals Grant and Prentiss concerning seniority. But John Fremont, initially a Naval contractor and NOT a graduate of West Point was a Regular Army officer until he resigned in 1848 “due to irregularities” regarding his involvement regarding the soon-to-be State of California. During his military service, Army Officer Fremont instituted and promoted the U.S. Army Corps of Topographical Engineers about 1838; and then set off on treks of discovery across the West of America (these treks so caught the American imagination, that the trails blazed by Fremont and followed by settlers of the West earned him the name, “Pathfinder.”) A Corps of Topographical Engineers with interest in Civil War history (and generation of accurate Civil War maps) has recently departed from the internet and “gone dark.” While searching for their new online location, ran across ANOTHER topographical engineers site, with their own magazine: LIDAR. This group appears to have been established in 2010 and consists primarily of retired members of the U.S. Army Corps of Topographical Engineers... (or whatever the Army calls that group of map-makers, spatial engineers and topographical intelligence collectors today.) Their magazines (about six per year) occasionally include Civil War material, such as: https://lidarmag.com/2004/02/29/bookmarks-pathfinder-john-charles-frmont-and-the-course-of-american-empire-by-tom-chaffin-2/ John Fremont. http://lidarmag.com/wp-content/uploads/PDF/LIDARMagazine_Maune-TopographicEngineers_Vol6No3.pdf Explanation of Topographical Engineers. and this is the site for their archives: https://lidarmag.com/archives/ LIDARMagazine N.B. After leaving the Army, John Fremont made a fortune during the California Gold Rush. He invested much of his wealth in the purchase of small arms in Europe in May/ June 1861.
  17. Ozzy

    See you in Memphis

    Gallop Part Five (Lew Wallace in Memphis) As Lew Wallace indicates in his Autobiography, “One day General Grant arrived and set up his HQ at Memphis. I assumed he was flying from Corinth (and Halleck's overbearing command). I saw the opportunity presented as allowing me to take a leave of absence, return to Indiana to resolve my business affairs, and return unencumbered to the field.” Meanwhile, unknown to Lew Wallace, Madame Rumor had been working overtime: Sherman reported to all and sundry on and after 16 June that “Wallace has gone to Memphis... Why is HE in Memphis!?” Grant expected to take command in Memphis (and meet his wife there). AAG John Rawlins constructed General Orders No.55 on 19 June announcing relocation of Major General Grant's HQ to Memphis. Sherman reported, “no enemy at Holly Springs.” Colonel Slack's commander at Columbus KY, Brigadier General Quinby, responded to Slack's urgent request for assistance: “I have no troops to spare” [OR 17 (2) pp.13-14.] Halleck reported to SecWar Stanton on 20 June 1862 that the Rebel enemy was dissolving; there was no Rebel force of any size south of Memphis; the M & C Railroad would be restored between Corinth and Memphis by Monday, June 23rd and the M & O Railroad would be restored north to Columbus Kentucky by June 25th. [An unintended consequence of this rosy report: Stanton requested Halleck to “cut off Vicksburg... which should prove an easy matter.” ] Sherman sent telegrams to Halleck complaining that Lew Wallace was in Memphis “doing nothing; and his Third Division was idle. May I have the use of Wallace's men to assist me in rebuilding railroads?” Halleck sent the memo from Sherman to McClernand [OR 17 (2) pp.18-19 and p.25. McClernand queried Wallace: “What are Sherman's men doing that he has called for yours?” ] Sherman's Memoirs pages 256 – 259 later recollected this period of railroad work (and it bears little resemblance to his gruff assertions and contemporary reports to be found in actual communications sent 12 – 24 June 1862 and found in OR 17 (part 2) pp.9 – 31.) Grant in his Memoirs page 317 declares, as of 10 June 1862, with conclusion of Pope's pursuit south of Corinth,“the Confederate forces were now driven out of West Tennessee...” Lew Wallace's reports to Halleck had either failed to arrive, or were deliberately withheld by “concerned operators intent on white-anting Lew Wallace.” Communications crossed in transmission; Lew Wallace received conflicting orders: some directed him to continue to protect Memphis; while others directed him to “return to the work of rebuilding railroads.” Meanwhile, Lew Wallace had sent a reconnaissance under cavalry officer Grierson away to the south of Memphis to determine enemy strength and intentions; and Halleck (through use of Sherman) had sent patrols southeast of Memphis and “found nothing there.” And Halleck and Sherman and Grant and Pope were all convinced that “there was no serious threat to Union forces, now in process of rebuilding the southern Rail network for Union use.”
  18. CSuniforms Glad you found this topic of interest. It had always puzzled me why "Grant's trip to Nashville" was merely touched on by a number of sources; and no two sources presented that trip (and its after-effects) in the same way. As result of the Nashville visit, an enmity was initiated between Ulysses Grant and Don Carlos Buell that festered during the month of March (and likely contributed to Buell's slow stroll to Savannah Tennessee.) Grant became better acquainted with WHL Wallace during the trip aboard W.H.B. and Wallace had been the officer who called on reinforcements from Lew Wallace. A Mexican War veteran, WHL Wallace had guided Lew Wallace with excellent suggestion of where to establish his line to repel the attempted breakout of 15 FEB (and the Confederate advance was rolled back from that position.) Jacob Lauman had revealed himself as a War Fighter at Belmont (where he was seriously wounded in the leg.) Arriving at Fort Donelson just a day or two previous to the breakout, Jacob Lauman was put in command of the brigade (with Tuttle's 2nd Iowa at its head) that General C.F. Smith led to glory. Smith, Tuttle, Lauman and McPherson all rode in advance of that charge, which broached the Outer Works of Fort Donelson afternoon of February 15th and directly led to Rebel capitulation next day. Jacob Lauman cemented his position as Action Officer on behalf of General Grant (as did WHL Wallace and his staff officer, Israel Rumsey) and all had essential roles in the lead-up to Day One at Battle of Shiloh. Ezra Taylor continued to fight his battery at Fort Donelson, advancing first to support Lew Wallace after much of McClernand's division had been pushed back. In the lead-up to Battle of Shiloh, Ezra Taylor was promoted to Major and installed as Chief of Artillery of Sherman's Fifth Division. LtCol James McPherson developed a severe throat condition and was evacuated to Hospital in St. Louis following the Confederate Surrender of 16 FEB 1862. Upon release from Hospital at beginning of March, LtCol McPherson (a staff officer belonging to Halleck) was assigned to BGen C.F. Smith, commander of the Tennessee River Expedition. Major John H. Brinton was a favorite Surgeon of Ulysses Grant; and the man could be relied upon for discretion. He performed necessary assignments for General Grant (including travelling to St. Louis during the build-up at Pittsburg Landing to personally request from MGen Henry Halleck required medicines and sufficient number of floating hospitals -- all of which was achieved.) After Battle of Shiloh, Surgeon Brinton was removed from Grant's Staff and found himself in Washington at the end of the war (where he established the Army Medical Museum, with purpose of improving medical care on the battlefield.) Agate (also known as Cincinnati news reporter Whitelaw Reid) wanted to align himself with a "fighting General" and rushed to Fort Donelson... but arrived too late. The Confederates surrendered, and Grant's forces occupied Clarksville; and it appears Reporter Reid got to Fort Donelson just after the W.H.B. departed, with General Grant aboard, bound for Clarksville, and then Nashville. But it appears Reid attempted to follow Grant, and took the next available steamer to Clarksville... only to miss Grant again. From reports that later appeared in Cincinnati and Chicago newspapers, it is likely Whitelaw Reid rode in company with General C.F. Smith to Nashville at the end of February. And he finally met U.S. Grant upon return to Fort Donelson (but was not over-awed.) At this time, it is believed Agate accompanied Grant or Smith up the Tennessee River; and it is known that Whitelaw Reid was at Pittsburg Landing and Crump's Landing by the 16th of March. Making frequent reports from the field, and staying with Lew Wallace at Crump's and LtCol Barton Kyle (71st Ohio of Stuart's Brigade) at Pittsburg Campground, Agate was at Crump's Landing on the morning of 6 APR 1862 and could hear the sound of battle emanating from the direction of Pittsburg Landing... so stole a ride aboard the steamer, Tigress, when Grant stopped briefly to speak with Lew Wallace. Because Whitelaw Reid left his horse behind at Crump's he was reliant on stragglers -- and his previous visits to the Pittsburg Campground -- to generate copy that burst onto the wires April 9th ...22000 words that generated such a public outcry that many called for General Grant to be removed from command. John McClernand is likely to have accompanied Grant to Clarksville to meet with Cave Johnson and other important residents and smooth the way for Union occupation of that Cumberland river port. When the flotilla bearing Bull Nelson arrived near Clarksville, General Grant was faced with a dilemma: leave McClernand at Clarksville; return him to Fort Donelson; or bring him along to Nashville. It was decided to take BGen McClernand along to Nashville. Following the visit to Nashville, "word got out" about that visit, with details only members of the party aboard W.H.B. would know. And Grant may have suspected John McClernand of leaking information. And that suspicion (true or not) would further sour the already tainted relationship between the two officers. Ulysses Grant put in place an elaborate Shell Game at Pittsburg Landing (involving the injured C.F. Smith, W.T. Sherman, William McMichael, and John Rawlins) to deny recently-promoted Major General McClernand (promotion with effect from 21 March 1862) enjoyment of lawful seniority. And subsequent "absence" of an Acting-commander on Sunday morning 6 April 1862, with MGen Grant at Savannah; MGen Smith sick-in-bed at Savannah; and BGen Sherman "acting commander of Pittsburg campground in Smith's absence" (and McClernand specifically NOT recognized as Acting-commander) ...almost resulted in fatal consequences for the Union. [Similar to what occurred at Fort Donelson during Grant's absence to visit Flag-Officer Foote.] In addition, while reviewing the Papers of US Grant recently, in Volume 4 pages 212 - 213 is a Letter dated 15 FEB 1862 from Grant to General G. W. Cullum at Cairo that could ONLY have been written prior to General Grant having knowledge of that morning's breakout attempt. Near the end of the letter Grant admits: "Colonel Webster is now making a reconnaissance with a view of sending a force above the town of Dover to occupy the river bank." [This indicates what Grant intended McArthur's brigade to accomplish.] At the bottom of page 213 Note 3 is to be found a Direction from Captain W.S. Hillyer (Grant's Staff) to BGen McClernand dated 15 FEB 1862 (and obviously sent before knowledge of the breakout attempt): "You will if practicable push on a portion of your column to the river, otherwise remain in statu quo til further orders -- maintaining your present position. You will direct that each regimental quartermaster proceed to our transports on the river and draw rations..." Unintended consequences have potential to be disastrous.
  19. Ozzy

    See you in Memphis

    Gallop Part Four (Lew Wallace in Memphis) On 18 June General Wallace, having heard no reply from Corinth, sent a repeat of his 17 June report, with request that it be forwarded to MGen McClernand (Wallace's direct commander, with HQ at Bethel). McClernand had meanwhile relocated his HQ to Jackson Tennessee; upon receipt of Wallace's report (via Corinth) on 20/ 21 June, he sent a copy of Wallace's report to Halleck and requested guidance IRT whether to allow General Wallace to remain in Memphis. On 22 June McClernand sent a reply which directed General Wallace to 1) remain in Memphis, or at any point along the line of the Memphis & Ohio Railroad 2) continue to prevent railroads within your reach from being injured, and 3) continue with your duties until you receive further instructions. General McClernand further advised that a copy of his 18 June telegram had been forwarded to General Halleck. But McClernand also informed Wallace that “a detachment of General Sherman's division had just returned from Holly Springs (50 miles southeast of Memphis), and found no Rebel troops there.” Wallace was also advised that General Grant was on his way to Memphis and would establish his HQ there; and McClernand suggested, “Might it not be better to establish your own HQ at Bolivar or Grand Junction?” Lew Wallace remained in Memphis, and as commander of the Occupation Force settled into his new role of defending the city and dealing with complaints from citizens; and enforcing restrictions on the unfriendly Press (one newspaper left Memphis and set up operation in Mississippi instead of bending to Federal guidelines.) Another, The Memphis Daily Argus, was put under control of two northern editors to operate (and one of these, A. D. Richardson, was subject of the book, Junius and Albert's Adventures in the Confederacy.) References: Cumberland Maryland Civilian & Telegraph 19 June 1862 page 2 col.6 bottom “An advance guard of General Wallace has arrived at Memphis; he will arrive himself (tomorrow) and take command of the city...” Cumberland Maryland Civilian & Telegraph 26 June 1862 page 2 col.1 bottom “MGen Lew Wallace in command at Memphis.” Cumberland Maryland Civilian & Telegraph 3 July 1862 page 1 col.4 “A special communication from Memphis dated June 22 reports over 300 shopkeepers in Memphis have taken the Oath of Allegiance in order to resume trade under Union occupation.” OR 17 (part 2) pages 14 - 15; 17 - 19; 21 (Halleck to "Commanding Officer at Memphis" on 21 June 1862 -- "You will employ all your available force to repairing the railroad to Grand Junction. This is a repeat of my order sent some time ago via Columbus.")
  20. Andreas Shiloh Map of 1884 (Completed to assist with construction of the Shiloh Cyclorama on display at Chicago.) The below Shiloh map gets the placement of Tilghman Creek correct; includes the locations of Snake Creek (Wallace) Bridge and Owl Creek Bridge; and attempts to more accurately depict the location of Union artillery [notice the three positions of Munch and Hickenlooper, of Prentiss's Sixth Division. When some argue that "Prentiss only had an insignificant fraction of his division remaining after withdrawal to the Hornet's Nest," they fail to consider the valuable contribution of these batteries, both of which fought ALL Day and ended up in Grant's Last Line.]
  21. Joe Excellent points, and I accept your stated concerns... The implication was made that John McClernand may have been the man who informed on particulars of General Grant's trip to Nashville as result of current lack of other possibilities (and Henry Coppee's statement that information “from someone” was sent to St. Louis and to Washington.) At the moment, McClernand's involvement is merely supposition. But, what makes John McClernand a suspect? He was a former friend of Ulysses S. Grant, in 1861 likely both men were of the same political party; and assuming McClernand's earlier commission as Colonel of Volunteers, Colonel McClernand was senior to Colonel Grant until both gained promotion to Brigadier General (at which time BGen Grant became senior to BGen McClernand.) John McClernand was known to correspond regularly with President Lincoln (so the line of communication with Washington pre-existed.) U.S. Grant appeared to mentor the neophyte General McClernand in “the ways of the Army” while both were assigned to Cairo Illinois after August 1861: Grant left McClernand in acting command of the post during absences; and McClernand was assigned senior positions during the raid on Belmont, and the Operation against Fort Henry. [It is my belief that Grant was attempting to develop the same relationship with McClernand that he later successfully cultivated with William T. Sherman.] The Fort Henry operation did not flow as planned: heavy rain turned roads into slippery slop and the Navy was able to rush forward and subjugate the fort before McClernand's men were in position to offer assistance. In particular, there was no timely pursuit of fleeing Rebels (and McClernand refused to take the blame for this lack of timely pursuit, instead calling attention to General Grant's failure to order an earlier start time for marching infantry involved in the Fort Henry operation.) In Grant's world, one did not question the decisions of the commanding general... especially NOT in public. Following Fort Henry, General Grant called a Council of War during which BGen McClernand presented an elaborate proposal on how the operation against Fort Donelson should be conducted. [Some say this public show-boating mortified Grant; Lew Wallace suggests that “the notorious unpleasantness that developed between Grant and McClernand was initiated with McClernand's reading of that paper.”] Ignoring the published orders, BGen McClernand surreptitiously moved his Division further to the east by several miles, and then commenced his march towards Fort Donelson several hours earlier than ordered [and then admitted he did so in his Fort Donelson report.] The Confederate breakout attempted at Fort Donelson was largely due to opportunity: it was found that the right end of McClernand's line was not properly anchored. [John McArthur occupied that position, on the orders of General Grant. And Grant assigned blame for the faulty siting of McArthur/ responsibility for the breakout (and near defeat of the Union plan at Fort Donelson) to McArthur and McClernand. Following the Surrender of Buckner on 16 FEB, McArthur and McClernand were both ordered to remain outside the captured fort (while pride of place, inside, went to Smith's Second Division) and McClernand's men were tasked with all the onerous fatigue duties to be performed (to such an extent that BGen McClernand wrote a Letter of Complaint to Grant on 17 FEB 1862).] References: SDG topic “We meet again” SDG topic “Grant and McClernand” posts of 16 July and 20 July 2018. Lew Wallace Autobiography page 377 (and note at bottom of page). SDG topic “McArthur (part two)” OR 7 pages 170 – 186 Fort Donelson reports (McClernand's) and the CSA breakout. OR 7 page 625 “General Field Orders No.13: the Second Division is to occupy Fort Donelson for comfort and security; the First Division is to be positioned outside the south end by General McClernand.” OR 7 page 633 “General Orders No.4 of 18 FEB 1862: All the outer guard will be performed by the First and Second Divisions, and Colonel McArthur will remain attached to the Second Division for orders. The First Division is responsible for placing guards on all roads and passes into the entrenchments from above Dover to out along the road west to Fort Henry.” Papers of US Grant vol.4 page 242 details McClernand's Letter of Complaint of 17FEB and Grant's response of 18 FEB 1862. Papers of US Grant vol.4 page 243 note at bottom: McClernand on 18 FEB suggests to Grant “the use of “captured Black men” to conduct fatigue duties (and thus replace the use of men [of his Division] in execution of those duties.)” Adam Badeau's Military History of U.S. Grant vol.1 page 43 details the role of McArthur and McClernand in the Confederate breakout attempt of 15 FEB 1862. [The passage is written in such a way that one assumes McArthur was placed in his position by McClernand; but Grant had sited McArthur (without attached artillery support) late on 14 FEB, after dark, and McArthur had no way of surveying his position, or its proximity to swampy ground, until daylight. In Papers of US Grant vol.4 page 213 Note 3 Captain W. S. Hillyer on 15 FEB directs McClernand “to extend your line to the river,” but McClernand did not have sufficient troops. So McArthur's Brigade was taken from Smith's Second Division (by Grant, who had authority to do so) and sent south to McClernand... but too late in the day to be correctly deployed. And the breakout attempt occurred just a few hours later ...and then someone had to get the blame for McArthur's poor siting, which permitted the breakout to be attempted. OR 7 page 218 Pugh's report of “McArthur's Brigade was moved into position on the extreme right of our forces too late to form any correct idea of the ground.” OR 7 page 215 McArthur's Fort Donelson report: “We were under arms awaiting orders on 14 FEB until 5 pm, when we were ordered to occupy ground on the extreme right of our lines. Arrived at our new position a little after dark (about 7 pm) having been hotly shelled by the enemy's batteries on the way. Encamped for the night without instructions, and, as I regret to add, without knowledge of the nature of the ground in front and on our right.” To conclude: Sometimes it is not REALITY that matters, but the PERCEPTION of reality. As regards Grant and McClernand, I believe Grant perceived McClernand as a rival, a glory hound, a gifted (but unscrupulous) politician able to shunt blame elsewhere, and a dangerous spy against Grant for President Lincoln. Whether or not John McClernand sent the unfriendly reports detailing Grant's visit to Nashville, General Grant likely believed McClernand was responsible: EVERYONE else that rode in company with General Grant aboard the W.H.B. was a man Grant could trust. [Following the return from Nashville, and continuing through the occupation of Pittsburg Landing, the friction between Grant and McClernand only increased...]
  22. Even during the bloody Civil War there were attempts at humor. The following parody of the Real Story of the Capture of Fort Donelson appeared in the Cumberland Maryland newspaper, Civilian & Telegraph of 3 July 1862 on the front page, center column:
  23. Ozzy

    See you in Memphis

    Gallop Part Three (Lew Wallace in Memphis) General Wallace had sent a telegram from Union Station, just outside Memphis, advising General Halleck of the movement of his Third Division to the west, and why that movement was undertaken . He then met with Colonel Slack; and the available Federal force (a total of about 5000 men) was distributed and positioned in such a way to provide a formidable counter to Forrest's anticipated thrust. But that cavalry raid did not eventuate. On June 17th a telegram arrived at Memphis: Henry Halleck demanded to know “Why was I in Memphis?” Wallace copied Colonel Slack's request for assistance, verbatum, and sent it in response... and heard nothing more from Corinth [Lew Wallace Autobiography page 586]. Believing it better to be on offence than defense, after four days of waiting MGen Wallace took a cavalry battalion assigned to Colonel Slack (6th Illinois Cavalry, Companies G, H, I, K and L , about 400 men under command of Colonel Benjamin Grierson) and sent it south to Hernando Mississippi (25 miles south of Memphis) with task of “engaging any Rebel cavalry; and destroying the Rebel-controlled railway depot.” Colonel Grierson departed with his force late on June 20th.
  24. Coppee Map of Shiloh (1866) One of the early maps of the Battle of Shiloh (published in Grant and his Campaigns in 1866 by Henry Coppee) this map suffers from a typical failure of the early map creators: attempting to place TWO days of troop movements on ONE map. AND it does not show REBEL troop positions... at all. Some of the other failings: Owl Creek Bridge not shown Shunpike not shown The map does not continue far enough west to site elements of McDowell's Brigade Grant's Last Line not shown Sherman's Final position on Day One not shown. With the above listing the failures, there are some positive attributes to this early Shiloh map: Tilghman Branch is sited, but not accurately (joined Owl Creek further west) Accurate siting of the River Road (used by Lew Wallace to reach the battlefield) Accurate depiction of the flooded Snake Creek and siting of Wallace Bridge Ownership of Second Division attributed to Smith (WHL Wallace was acting-commander) Good depiction of the jumbled road network at Pittsburg Campground Accurate siting of “the other” Pittsburg Landing (on east bank of Tennessee River, used by Nelson to board transports for the battle taking place on the west bank of the Tennessee) Upper Landing at Pittsburg also sited accurately (where many steamers tied up when Pittsburg Landing was full) Involvement of USS Tyler and USS Lexington indicated Good depiction of woods, scrubland and clearings.
  25. Joe Upon investigation it is apparent three journalists were in theatre with General Grant (Whitelaw Reid at Fort Donelson; Henri Villard with Brigadier General Nelson; and Franc Bangs Wilkie who arrived at Nashville just prior to General Nelson) and NONE of these were in company with General Grant during his voyage aboard W.H.B. bound for Nashville... so newspaper reports of the day were all hear-say and extrapolation. However, ONE man went in company with General Grant on the voyage from Fort Donelson (when it was believed the W.H.B. was going only as far as Clarksville): Brigadier General John McClernand. Of the travellers aboard the W.H.B, McClernand was the odd man out, a former-friend of Grant who found himself out of favor due to disloyalty... PERSONAL disloyalty exhibited before witnesses against Ulysses S. Grant (during a Council of War that occurred just after the capture of Fort Henry.) John McClernand appears to have been taken along on the trip to Clarksville because 1) he had friendly political connections with powerful men based at Clarksville, and could smooth capitulation to Union occupation, and 2) McClernand WITH Grant was McClernand NOT at Fort Donelson (where as senior ranking officer, he might have become Acting-commander in Grant's absence.) The above is noteworthy, because on page 81 (Note at bottom of page) of Henry Coppee's Grant and his Campaigns (1866) is revealed, "Some malignant person revealed Grant's trip to Nashville to Halleck and to Washington..." https://archive.org/details/granthiscampaign01lccopp/page/81/mode/1up/search/Nashville TWO Letters out there, somewhere, that may hold clues to Grant's celebration after Victory at Fort Donelson...
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