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rwaller

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rwaller last won the day on July 8

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About rwaller

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    Civil War history - travel - wine

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  1. Civil War Weekend Cancelled in Manassas

    The street scum trying to erase our history here in the United States are our own homegrown Jihad. They are one small degree away from the barbarians of the middle east that would destroy Roman ruins or blow up the Buddhist carvings, but probably could not give you a coherent reason why.
  2. Baseball, anyone?

    In the opening scenes of Glory they show northern soldiers playing baseball in their camp.
  3. July 4th 1862

    Excellent thoughts Ozzy.
  4. Reporters at Shiloh

    Fascinating Ozzy. I actually have that book, can't remember where I got it, I think I paid a buck for it. It seemed to be heavily weighted toward the eastern theater of war. I will revisit it. Thomas Nast had an interesting career. Winslow Homer, I was just thinking about one of his paintings, 'the veteran in a new field ' 1865, shows a veteran back home after the war working with a sythe harvesting a field of grain.
  5. Not just pictures...

    So Lovie rode the Hanibal to Pittsburgh Landing arriving around 3:00 on the afternoon of April 6th? You wrote before that Reid was present at Pittsburgh Landing at the time of the battle. I have a description of two Chicago 'newspaper men' on the deck of a steamer interviewing wounded men as they were being brought on board and getting fantastic and exaggerated accounts of the battle. Did Reid stay at the landing or immediately set off downriver to file his 'story '?
  6. "On the Cover of the Rolling Stone..."

    Harrison report sounds like the report of someone relaying what he heard from others but did not actually see himself. I'm not in front of my main computer so don't have access to my eyewitness accounts from the 8th Texas. This man supplies precious few details for someone who supposedly just led a grand cavalry charge that should have been the highlight of his military career. I'm skeptical.
  7. "On the Cover of the Rolling Stone..."

    Don't ask me how this reposted my previous comments. This report from Harrison is very strange almost to the point of asking if he was actually at the battle. It runs counter to all of the eyewitness accounts I have, including members of the 8th Texas Cavalry.
  8. "On the Cover of the Rolling Stone..."

    Thank you Ozzy, Forrest was placed in command of all of the confederate rearguard cavalry but had only a company sized command of his own. Is that correct? It was the 8th Texas Cavalry that brought around 225 men into the fight at and their description of the battle downplayed Forrest role. Timothy Smith has a letter written by a Mississippi cavalry man from yet another command in his book on Shiloh. On the Union side all of the casualties were from the 77th Ohio, and one man from the 53rd Ohio was hit by a pistol ball undoubtedly fired by Forrest himself as he rode through the 77th Ohio ' line, but not before being shot point blank by a member of the 77th who shoved his rifle into Forrests side, just above the hip, and pulled the trigger. How a man shot point blank by a .69 caliber ball could stay in the saddle and not pass out or fall off his horse, defys belief. The 53rd were in line of battle and were closing up on the 77th from behind when Forrest broke through their line but could not fire because of the 77th in front.
  9. "On the Cover of the Rolling Stone..."

    Thank you Ozzy, Forrest was placed in command of all of the confederate rearguard cavalry but had only a company sized command of his own. Is that correct? It was the 8th Texas Cavalry that brought around 225 men into the fight at and their description of the battle downplayed Forrest role. Timothy Smith has a letter written by a Mississippi cavalry man from yet another command in his book on Shiloh. On the Union side all of the casualties were from the 77th Ohio, and one man from the 53rd Ohio was hit by a pistol ball undoubtedly fired by Forrest himself as he rode through the 77th Ohio ' line, but not before being shot point blank by a member of the 77th who shoved his rifle into Forrests side, just above the hip, and pulled the trigger. How a man shot point blank by a .69 caliber ball could stay in the saddle and not pass out or fall off his horse, defys belief. The 53rd were in line of battle and were closing up on the 77th from behind when Forrest broke through their line but could not fire because of the 77th in front.
  10. "On the Cover of the Rolling Stone..."

    Thank you Mona. I don't have my book on Morgan in front of me now, the volume I have was written by Dee Brown who wrote Bury my heart at Wounded Knee, I believe. I think he describes Ellsworth as an Englishman. His description of him was extremely interesting of how he would climb the pole and attach his wires and listen in on the Yankees and send them false orders and so forth.
  11. "On the Cover of the Rolling Stone..."

    John Hunt Morgan had quite an interesting career. I have a question, was he at Fallen Timbers along with Nathan Bedford Forrest? Was he under the command of Forrest or independent? In response to your other post, Morgan had a man with him who could tap the Telegraph lines and also send false telegraph messages up the line. Very interesting indeed. Thanks Ozzy.
  12. Surgeon Samuel Everett - "E" Tree?

    I have an account saying that in the weeks following the battle numerous civilians could be seen on the battlefield searching for the graves of their loved ones in an attempt at recovering their bodies to take home for a proper burial. Not to be too graphic but it was noted how gruesome it was for family members to exhume a body that had been buried for a couple of weeks, wrap it up, and take it home. There must have been an embalmer somewhere at Pittsburgh Landing or Savanah. In the 77th Ohio, Mr. Porterfield from Marietta, Ohio, traveled out to the Fallen Timbers battlefield and retrieved the body of his son William whose grave had been carefully marked by his comrades and took him home.
  13. It would be kind of crazy to picture soldiers in the federal ranks in homespun. There should definitely have been enough time to get them uniforms before the battle. The account I mentioned earlier implied that the new volunteers were formed into their own company. It also said that people came from far and wide to see the Yankees at Savanah and that federal cavalry patrols had been out into the surrounding countryside and were bringing in scores of prisoners each day.
  14. Hello Ozzy and Rbn3, I have an account of a newspaper correspondent from Monroe County Ohio who was riding upriver on a steamer with company A, 77th Ohio, who were from Monroe County, letting the folks back home know how they were getting along. He mentions the southern Union volunteers were already being drilled when they arrived at Savanah, Tennessee, and that were still wearing their butternut homespun clothing. He mentions that the sutlers were already set up and selling their wares. Barrels labeled 'eggs' were a hot item, actually whiskey. He was concerned that the boys were developing too strong a liking for it , this being their first time away from home.
  15. Shiloh Feature Film

    Ozzy, same with The Last Full Measure sequel to Gettysburg ever being made. Too costly to do it right.
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