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Found 81 results

  1. Pictorial History

    Published in 1890 (and now available at hathitrust) this two-volume set of sketches contains images of Fort Donelson, Shiloh and Corinth you have probably never seen before: Pictorial History of The Soldier in our Civil War. In Volume one, the section on Fort Donelson begins page 235. Pittsburg Landing/Shiloh begins page 262 (with the image of "McClernand's Second Line on April 6th" of particular interest.) Also, a detailed diagram of Grant's Last Line, bottom of page 265. And on page 266, two-page sketch of Lew Wallace's advance April 7th. On page 268, an interesting sketch by Henri Lovie of "Hurlbut under attack at the Peach Orchard on April 6th." The section on Corinth: page 274- 280 (includes a sketch of the Female College at Corinth.) Links below... Ozzy http://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=mdp.39015020728781;view=2up;seq=272;size=300 Soldier in our Civil War, vol.1 http://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=mdp.39015046806710;view=2up;seq=10;size=125 Soldier in our Civil War, vol.2 N.B. There is also a sketch of Robert's Raid at Island No.10 (page 240) I had never seen anywhere else... Ozzy.
  2. Value of the POWs

    Sixteen hundred Federal prisoners commenced their slow march to Corinth on Monday morning, April 7th and soon began to realize things had not gone well militarily for their Southern captors. Many witnessed the body of General Albert Sidney Johnston (under escort of six officers) passing, enroute for the train to New Orleans via Memphis [Genoways p.56]. As the POWs trudged towards Corinth, there was no ignoring the makeshift hospitals -- one after another after another -- on both sides of the road, tending the Rebel wounded [Genoways p.96]. But the singular event that gave the captured men hope was the unexpected appearance of a squad of Confederate cavalry, obviously in a panic, that flew past -- heading South -- in the early afternoon [Genoways p.89 and 129]. Those mounted stragglers provided proof that their Federal comrades had reversed the tide of the battle; and offered hope that they would overtake the marching men before they reached Corinth, and re-capture them. Alas... not to be. Ozzy Reference: A Perfect Picture of Hell, Genoways & Genoways, University of Iowa Press (2001)
  3. Presented is an interesting telegram sent by Major George W. Brent (from the former Army of the Mississippi HQ at Jackson, Tennessee) to General Beauregard at Corinth on April 2nd 1862: http://civilwar.rosenbach.org/?p=5512 [from "Today in the Civil War: dispatches from the Rosenbach Collection"]. Ozzy
  4. Zollicoffer's Brigade

    As we all know, Felix Zollicoffer was killed (as result of an odd blunder) at Battle of Mill Springs in January 1862. However, his Brigade lived on to fight again... at the Battle of Shiloh. Who commanded Zollicoffer's Brigade at Shiloh? Ozzy
  5. From a jack to a King

    From W.S. Hillyer's letter of April 11th 1862 it is apparent U.S. Grant and his Staff officers believed they had the situation as they found it fully in hand within an hour or two of arriving at Pittsburg Landing on April 6th. Sherman was being pushed back, to be sure, but only gradually and grudgingly; Hurlbut, Prentiss and WHL Wallace were established in a naturally strong position; and orders had been sent for the 3rd Division to come up from Crump's, and the arrival of that strong, fresh force of reinforcements would be enough to tip the scales and assure Federal victory. Hillyer in his letter makes mention of Grant "sending staff officers flying across the battlefield, effecting orders" and Captain Hillyer, himself, was sent by General Grant on one occasion to direct a cavalry reconnaissance. At about 1pm Grant, Rowley (and possibly Hillyer) set out for another meeting with General Sherman; they were riding west along the Pittsburg-Purdy Road when they encountered the just-returned Cavalry officer, Frank Bennett, at the intersection with the Savannah-Hamburg Road (sometimes called the River Road.) And what Bennett reported -- Lew Wallace was not coming via the River Road -- must have hit General Grant like a hammer. Wallace's reinforcing division had been promised to Hurlbut/WHL Wallace; LtCol James McPherson had even identified the position where Lew Wallace would go... After sending Rowley and Bennett away back north (with orders to bring Lew Wallace via the River Road) General Grant aborted the intended meeting with Sherman: the priority now was to find out from Quartermaster Baxter what directions he'd delivered to Lew Wallace. Grant turned back east. And, as if the non-arrival of Lew Wallace wasn't enough bad news, when the General gained the bluff overlooking the Tennessee River, the steamers he'd sent hours earlier to ferry Nelson's men across from the east bank were still there, with no sign of activity in their vicinity. This had to be the low-water mark for Grant's fortunes (and outlook) on Day One: neither of his anticipated sources of reinforcements were coming. It is my belief that a readily-available staff officer (Captain Clark Lagow) was now pressed into service; given a hurriedly written order directed to "Commanding Officer, Advanced Forces" and verbal orders to "Hurry forward General Nelson." Lagow departed immediately on an available steamer (and at some stage during his transit down river put his verbal orders to General Nelson into written form, signed "C.B. Lagow ADC" [Papers of US Grant vol 5 pages 17-18]. General Grant entered the HQ building (where I believe John Rawlins acted as point-of-contact in Grant's absence) and probably confronted his Assistant Adjutant General in regard to what orders he'd authorized Baxter to deliver to Lew Wallace. While engaged in this conversation, word must have come that "the Tigress had just returned." Grant and Rawlins rode down to the Landing and boarded Tigress to confront Baxter. Present at this meeting in the Ladies' Cabin aboard the Headquarters boat were U.S. Grant, John Rawlins, W.S. Hillyer and A.S. Baxter. The time was just after 1:30 pm. Just an attempt to connect some dots... Ozzy References to be found in SDG posts "Buell meets Grant" ..."Letter of W.S. Hillyer" ... "Impression of Grant" ..."Where was Grant?" N.B. Apologies to Ned Miller for use of his 1957 song title, "From a Jack to a King."
  6. A Message sent by Steamer

    Sent from Pittsburg Landing on April 6th 1862 to: "Commanding Officer Advance Forces near Pittsburg, Ten -- General: The attack on my forces has been very spirited from early this morning. The appearance of fresh troops on the field now would have a powerful effect both by inspiring our men and disheartening the enemy. If you will get upon the field leaving all your baggage on the East bank of the river it will be a move to our advantage and possibly save the day to us. The rebel forces is estimated at over 100,000 men. My head quarters will be in the log building on top of the hill where you will be furnished a staff officer to guide you to your place on the field. Respectfully & etc. U.S. Grant, Major General" Our full understanding and appreciation of the above message suffers because it does not carry the clock time of its sending, leaving many to believe it was sent by General Grant within an hour or two of his arrival on the Battlefield. Some even believe Captain W.S. Hillyer was the courier who took the above message to Savannah. But the message is actually a politely-worded order which contains many interesting elements: sent from Pittsburg Landing sent by MGen Grant (not Rawlins, or another aide) sent to "the Commanding Officer" [because U.S. Grant did not yet know General Buell had already arrived in vicinity of Savannah] "fresh troops now would have an inspiring effect" "leave all your baggage behind" [This direction had unintended consequences.] "the rebel forces is estimated at over 100,000 men" [Did Grant believe this estimate; or merely sent for effect?] "My HQ are the log building on top of the hill" [Identifies General Grant's desired point-of-contact.] The above message was sent by courier, and intercepted by Don Carlos Buell before 2pm as he steamed up the Tennessee River (and is recorded in Buell's 1887 Century article, "Shiloh Reviewed.") Ozzy
  7. Buell meets Grant

    Depending on the reference, General Buell is reported to have arrived at Pittsburg Landing by steamer from Savannah early afternoon of April 6th and met General Grant: a) at the house near the river, or b] aboard Grant's dispatch boat (floating HQ) the Tigress. Upon review of primary sources, the only man who infers Buell met Grant at the house is John Rawlins, Grant's AAG [OR 10 page 185]. Every other primary source (including Grant, himself) indicates the initial meeting took place aboard the Tigress [Memoirs vol.1 page 283.] General Buell goes into more detail, and reports "that he arrived at Pittsburg Landing and enquired for General Grant, and was directed to the nearly adjacent dispatch boat. Buell went aboard and met General Grant at the door of the Ladies' Cabin. Several of Grant's Staff officers were also in that cabin [Century article of 1887, pages 492-493]. Also worth noting: General Buell was accompanied by at least one Staff officer, his Chief of Staff, James Barnet Fry. Why is this meeting and its location important? In the early afternoon, Grant's messengers returned from delivering their orders to MGen Lew Wallace. The first messenger encountered by Grant, Lieutenant Frank Bennett, was met by Grant and Captain Rowley (ADC) as the pair were riding west to meet with General Sherman. Cavalry Officer Bennett reported that he'd met Wallace and his 3rd Division while they were having dinner (between 1130 and noon) and that Wallace intended on taking the route that his written orders (delivered by Baxter) directed; Lew Wallace was not coming via the River Road. General Grant immediately sent Rowley and Bennett back north up the River Road with orders for Lew Wallace to "Bring your division to Pittsburg Landing via the River Road" and, in addition, gave Captain Rowley authority to put those orders in writing if Lew Wallace demanded. Grant watched the messengers depart; then aborted his meeting with Sherman, reversed course, and returned to Pittsburg Landing... to find the Tigress (carrying Captain A.S. Baxter, AQM) had returned from Crump's Landing. The "conversation" between John Rawlins, A.S. Baxter and U.S. Grant would have been most interesting... and may have been interrupted by the arrival of General Buell. Timing is everything... Ozzy N.B. The above meeting between Grant, Rawlins and Baxter is conjecture, based on timing of significant events -- Ozzy.
  8. 38th Tennessee diary

    The 8th Tennessee (Looney's) had a convoluted beginning: initiated in September 1861, the infantry regiment was ineptly utilized by High Command (somehow failed to get significant assignments, i.e., "fell through the cracks.") Following loss of the substantial Confederate force at Fort Donelson, there arrived an urgency to "get men from any- and every-where" and the 38th Tennessee was organized from the core of the 8th Tennessee... and the unit's first significant action was Shiloh. This diary was written by John D. Thomas of Memphis, recruited to the 38th Tennessee on March 6th 1862. Written over the course of three days in July 1862, while he was camped near Tupelo, this work could better be described as a "thoughtful memory," or "a letter never sent." Detailed and descriptive, the diary is noteworthy for: description of Memphis & Charleston Railroad in March 1862 (required three days to travel by rail from Memphis to Jackson, Tennessee) impression of General PGT Beauregard by men-in-ranks; "We were transported to the most miserable town of Corinth" [page 6] "After helping build fortifications at Corinth, our orders arrived..." pages 10-12 describe Thomas' experience at Shiloh Day 1, including 38th Tennessee involvement in capture of General Prentiss; pages 12-13 discuss Day 2, and the two-day slog back to Corinth through knee-deep mud; page 14 mentions the evacuation of Corinth on May 28th, and Thomas' elevation to Brigade Ordnance Sergeant. Only 15 pages long, this diary contains detail not found anywhere else. (Another gem introduced by David "Ole Miss") Ozzy References: http://clio.lib.olemiss.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/civil_war/id/2803/rec/1 John D. Thomas' diary http://familysearch.org/wiki/en/38th_Regiment,_Tennessee_Infantry_(Looney's)_(8th_Infantry) History of 38th Tennessee http://tngenweb.org/civilwar/38th-tennessee-infantry-regiment/ 38th Tennessee (accurate except regiment organized March vice May 1862)
  9. Bragg's Memoirs

    Along with George H. Thomas and Henry Halleck, Braxton Bragg is one of the Civil War leaders whose memoirs -- and raisons d'Etat -- I would most like to read. Many are the reasons given why General Bragg never got around to those musings; and this post suggests one more possibility, and it involves a man named Kinloch Falconer. An 1860 graduate of the University of Mississippi, Kinloch Falconer joined the 9th Mississippi as a Private and accompanied his regiment to Pensacola, Florida in March 1861, and became part of Braxton Bragg's force there, occupying the former U.S. Navy Yard and all the pre-war fortifications... except Fort Pickens. The key to control of access to Pensacola Bay, Fort Pickens was a thorn in the side of General Bragg (who ordered Colonel Chalmers to attempt a night raid against that facility 8/9 October 1861.) A month later, on November 22nd a gunnery duel erupted, pitting Confederate batteries at Fort Barrancas and Fort McRee against Union-held Fort Pickens and a squadron of Federal warships in the Gulf of Mexico. Because the guns at Pickens and Barrancas were not designed to fire all the way across at each other -- about three miles -- neither of these forts suffered much damage. Fort McRee (sometimes spelled Fort McRae) was another matter: only one mile from fort Pickens, on the opposite spit of land controlling the entrance to Pensacola Bay, Fort McRee was the most exposed of the Confederate positions. And it was just outside that wing-shaped fort that the 9th Mississippi was dug in, assigned to guns designed to prevent a landing by Federal troops. (The 10th Mississippi, under command of Colonel J.B. Villepigue, operated the big guns inside Fort McRee.) Over the course of 36 hours, the entire vicinity of Fort McRee was blasted by guns from Fort Pickens and warships USS Richmond and USS Niagara. Fort McRee was reduced to a smoldering ruin; but Colonel Villepigue's spirited defense of the position won acclaim from Braxton Bragg, and he was promoted to Brigadier General. Kinloch Falconer -- who had spent time clerking for General Bragg -- came to the notice of newly-minted General Villepigue, and was assigned as his Assistant Adjutant General. The 9th Mississippi left Florida in early 1862, and went on to fight alongside the 10th Mississippi at Shiloh. But Kinloch Falconer did not accompany his regiment; instead, he was promoted to Captain and followed General Villepigue to his new assignment: defense of Fort Pillow, on the Mississippi River. That position was evacuated just before the fall of Memphis (in June 1862) and John B. Villepigue (alumnus of The Citadel and 1854 graduate of West Point) next found himself assigned as Brigade commander (in Lovell's Division) Earl Van Dorn's Army of West Tennessee. Wounded during the October 3-5 Battle of Second Corinth, Villepigue succumbed to his wounds in November. And Captain Falconer found himself re-assigned to General Braxton Bragg, for whom he worked as AAG until early 1865... when he was again re-assigned, this time to the Staff of General Joseph E. Johnston. (When Johnston accepted terms offered by William Tecumseh Sherman on April 26th 1865 it was Major Falconer's signature that appeared on the Surrender Document.) Kinloch Falconer's war was over, but his usefulness was not. It was known that the AAG to several general officers had kept meticulous records -- and a diary -- during his years of service to the Confederacy. (One element of his diary, for the year 1865, is on file at Vanderbilt University at Nashville.) In the years after the war, General J.E. Johnston frequently contacted Falconer for precise details IRT Operations conducted during the War of the Rebellion. Braxton Bragg, too, contacted Falconer in 1870 with many questions IRT Bragg's military operations (which may indicate that Bragg was contemplating writing his memoirs, before his untimely death in 1876.) Kinloch Falconer, himself, met an untimely death in 1878. Then serving as Secretary of State for Mississippi, while on a visit to seriously ill relatives at Holly Springs he succumbed to the Yellow Fever epidemic then raging. His papers are now on file with the University of Mississippi. Ozzy References: http://clio.lib.olemiss.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/civil_war/id/2108/rec/8 Bragg's 1870 query to Falconer http://ufdcimages.uflib.ufl.edu/UF/00/08/56/93/00002/00067jc.pdf Falconer's involvement with Johnston's surrender 1865 http://clio.lib.olemiss.edu/cdm/search/searchterm/Kinloch Falconer Collection/mode/exact/page/1 Kinloch Falconer Collection http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Bordenave_Villepigue General J. B. Villepigue at wikipedia N.B. Thanks to David (Ole Miss) for providing access to the Kinloch Falconer Collection.
  10. On page 435 of MOLLUS (Ohio) volume 5 of 1903 is a detailed, informative letter written by Andrew Hickenlooper on April 11th 1862 to his family back in Ohio. In the letter, mention is made of the 5th Ohio Battery losing two guns and over fifty horses in the action on Sunday; and recall of 10,000 shirkers observed huddled along the left bank of the Tennessee River; and mention is made of being assigned early on Sunday morning to act as bodyguard to General Grant, and subsequently riding all along the Battlefield in company with the Federal commander... Wait a minute; what's going on here? As we know, Andrew Hickenlooper presents as one of the remarkable leaders at the Battle of Shiloh. In command of the 5th Independent Battery Ohio Volunteer Light Artillery (usually referred to as 5th Ohio Battery) Captain Hickenlooper began the morning of April 6th in defense of Prentiss' 6th Division, somewhat in advance of the camps; he fell back with Prentiss (leaving two of his 6-pounders behind) and redeployed in support of the area later known as the Hornet's Nest (the 5th Ohio Battery itself supported by Colonel Geddes 8th Iowa Infantry), and was there in action from just after 9am until about 4:30pm. Ordered to withdraw to the north, Hickenlooper successfully evacuated four artillery pieces north... and somehow became attached to Sherman's 5th Division (and in support of Sherman became involved in some of the final actions on Day 1 before night put an end to Sunday's fighting.) For such gallant actions, Hickenlooper and his 5th Ohio Battery were Mentioned in Despatches by two Division Commanders in their Shiloh After-action reports [OR 10 p.250 (Sherman) and page 280 (Prentiss)]. Andrew Hickenlooper. One of those iconic names (in company with Wallace, Prentiss, Peabody and Johnston), always to find association with the Battle of Shiloh. So imagine my surprise to discover there was another Andrew Hickenlooper at Shiloh. This other Andrew even came to the attention of Artillery Captain Andrew, just after 10am while the 5th Ohio Battery was readying itself for its next action in the Hornet's Nest. Captain Hickenlooper reports: "It was during one of these temporary lulls (after the first attack) that General Grant and staff, surrounded by a detachment of 5th Ohio Cavalry as his bodyguard, approached our position. His presence was interesting to me, but incomparably less so than the unexpected appearance in his escort of Andrew Hickenlooper, whom I supposed was back at home in Ohio. We had time for a moment's recognition before they rode away, and I turned again to join in the serious business of the day." [MOLLUS (Ohio) page 431.] This other Andrew Hickenlooper was 65 years old and joined the 5th Ohio Cavalry as a Saddler, merely for the opportunity to be close to his son, who commanded the 5th Ohio Battery. [To find out what happened to Andrew Hickenlooper, Sr., you can read the article for yourself, from Page 432.] Ozzy References: http://suvcw.org/mollus/war/OHv5.htm MOLLUS (Ohio) Volume 5, Sketches of War History guide http://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=mdp.39015042015092;view=2up;seq=500;size=300 Capt Hickenlooper (p.479) http://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=uiug.30112047586075;view=1up;seq=290 Saddler Hickenlooper, Co. G (p.277) [note age] http://archive.org/stream/sketcheswarhist01unkngoog#page/n4/mode/2up Sketches, MOLLUS (Ohio) vol.5 pages 402-483 (Battle of Shiloh parts 1 and 2 by Brevet BGen Andrew Hickenlooper published 1903) Sketches of War History. Letter of Andrew Hickenlooper (April 11th 1862) at above link: MOLLUS (Ohio) vol.5 page 435-6.
  11. On the morning of the 6th of April, Sergeant Seymour Thompson was a twenty-year old member of 3rd Iowa, Company F, eating breakfast with his messmates, when the growing sound and increasing frequency of musket fire to the south and southwest became concerning. But with the booming of not-so-distant artillery, there was no mistake: the Federal camp at Pittsburg Landing was under attack. The long roll trilled and SGT Thompson joined his fellows in ranks for the march south to aid General Prentiss' 6th Division... but General Stephen Hurlbut halted his men well short of Prentiss' camps -- made aware of that Division's disintegration by the swelling stream of wide-eyed skeddadlers racing north -- and Sergeant Thompson and the rest of the 3rd Iowa found themselves arranged in a line of blue, stretching roughly east-west across a cotton field. And not long after the stragglers thinned out a bit, Thompson caught his first sight of the enemy: "The Rebel regiments with their red banners flashing in the morning sun marched proudly and all undisturbed through the abandoned camps of Prentiss. To the enemy's surprise, suddenly appeared our line of blue, widely deployed upon the open field, the ground sloping towards him, and not a brush to conceal us from his view: a single blue line, compact and firm, crowned with a hedge of sparkling bayonets, our flags and banners flapping in the breeze. And in our center a battery of six guns, whose dark mouths scowled defiance at him. "The enemy's infantry fronted towards us and stood. Ours kneeled and brought their pieces to the ready... Thus for some moments, the antagonists surveyed each other... until a regiment on our left opened fire, and the other regiments got caught up, and the fire was carried along the entire line..." Thus relates Seymour Thompson his initiation into the Battle of Shiloh in his 1864 book, Recollections with the 3rd Iowa Regiment. Nearly forty pages of this 400-page history are devoted to arrival at Pittsburg Landing and subsequent battle. The first hundred pages relate the forming of the regiment (and trouble arising from the political "selection" of Colonel from outside the regiment, in opposition to the usual practice of vote of members); and everything one could ever want to know about guarding railroads in northern Missouri. The book concludes with Thompson's discussion of 3rd Iowa's disastrous participation in the Battle of Jackson, Mississippi in July 1863. Because only two years passed between Battle of Shiloh and publication of the book, many unexpected insights and revelations are included IRT how that battle was fought; what chance the Confederates had of winning; and observations of early-career U.S. Grant, W.T. Sherman and John Pope. And Stephen Hurlbut comes in for criticism early on (during operations in Missouri); but over the course of Days 1 and 2 at Shiloh, Hurlbut experiences a transcendence in the view of the author, and most of the men of the 4th Division. Available at archive.org (free site for out-of-copyright books). Ozzy http://archive.org/stream/recollectionswit00thomp#page/n3/mode/2up N.B. SDG member, Hank, first made mention of this work by Lieutenant Thompson several months ago... but I only just got around to it.
  12. Diary from the 3rd Iowa

    Available online from the University of Iowa Library are these three diaries (for years 1861, 1862 and 1863) written by 20-year-old schoolteacher, Turner S. Bailey. Working in Epworth, Iowa (about three miles west of Dubuque) at the start of 1861, his diary for that year focuses on teaching classes, the weather, and local issues... until April 15th. "Considerable excitement about war. Fort Sumter taken by the South." Beginning with that entry, Turner indicates growing preoccupation with "war fever" until enlisting in the 3rd Iowa Co. A at Dubuque on May 22nd; travelling with the regiment to Keokuk in June; and duty in Missouri (guarding railroads) beginning in July. In March 1862, it was decided to add the 3rd Iowa to the growing Federal force on the Tennessee River; Private Bailey arrived opposite Pittsburg Landing on the 15th. On the 17th the 3rd Iowa went ashore at Pittsburg Landing and went into camp near "their friends in the 12th Iowa." Each subsequent day is faithfully recorded -- the weather, the skirmish on April 4th -- and of course, the Battle of April 6/7. On the attached link, click on the desired diary... a new page will open... click on the diary again for access to every page. [University of Iowa adds another diary, or collection of Civil War letters, about every 3-6 months, so worthwhile to check back every once in a while to see what's been made available.] http://www.iowaheritage.org/items/browse?advanced[0][element_id]=49&advanced[0][type]=is+exactly&advanced[0][terms]=Infantry Cheers Ozzy
  13. There are some exceptional "tall tales" to be found in the Official Records of the Civil War, and we all have our favourites... But I would be hard-pressed to find a more bare-faced contrived furphy than the one expressed by General William Tecumseh Sherman on April 10th 1862 in his after-action report IRT the Battle of Shiloh. Included at the bottom of page 253 of OR 10, Sherman asserts: "The enemy captured seven of our guns on Sunday, but on Monday we recovered seven guns -- not the identical guns we had lost, but enough in numbers to balance the account." Confirmed by examination of the record, Sherman's Fifth Division had been assigned the following artillery (lost guns in parenthesis): Waterhouse (3) Taylor (0) Behr (5) On its face, this is a minor mistake: total of 8 artillery pieces actually lost, as against seven reported by Sherman as lost. However, it must be remembered that Waterhouse was forced to abandon a gun during one of his northerly movements. So the total becomes... 9. And allowance must be given for the combined operations that commenced with MGen McClernand's offer of assistance before 8am. Initially, BGen Sherman requested only a squadron of cavalry with which to conduct surveillance; but that quickly expanded into a request for support from the First Division. And McClernand provided that support, initially via separately directed troop movements and actions; but following on the assembly (and collapse) of the 2nd Line along the Hamburg-Purdy Road at about 10:30am the operations of the 5th Division and 1st Division become practically indistinguishable. And this "incorporation" of two distinct Army divisions into the "Sherman & McClernand Joint operation" is cemented further through the employment of Major Ezra Taylor, who began the day as Sherman's Chief of Artillery; but who assumed control of the employment of artillery of the 1st Division after 10:30am. That said, Taylor cannot be given blame for the disaster that befell Jerome Burrows and his 14th Ohio Battery (all six guns lost about 10:30 due to concerted effort of SAM Woods' Brigade.) But Major Taylor admits (OR 10 page 274) "taking responsibility for ordering two guns of Schwartz into position" (one gun lost.) And on page 275: "Dresser's Battery (Captain Timony) was put in battery under my direction on Sunday... in front of General McClernand's HQ" (four guns lost.) [General McClernand admits to maintaining control of McAllister's Battery; so its loss of one gun, captured by the 4th Tennessee, is attributable to him.] Therefore, the total number of guns lost by Sherman (or agents of Sherman) on April 6th stands at 14. Ozzy References: OR pages as sited DW Reed's Battle of Shiloh and the Organizations Engaged (1903) pages 91-101.
  14. The full quote: "A kind of wild excitement seized me and my comrades, and we would rush forward, thinking of ourselves as Invincible." This is how Private Thomas Keen described being in battle, in company with his fellows and with bullets flying all around. Found in I thought it my Duty to Go: the Civil War Letters of Thomas Keen (1838-1908) of the 1st Nebraska Infantry, edited by James E. Potter, and made available by the Nebraska Historical Society. Twenty-three letters from August 1861 (one month after the 1st Nebraska was mustered into service at Omaha) until 1864 (when Keen was mustered out at Hickory Street Hospital in St Louis), covering duty in Missouri, Tennessee, Mississippi, Arkansas, and back to Missouri. Of interest, because Keen vividly describes the action of Colonel Thayer's Nebraska Regiment at Fort Donelson; and the role of the 1st Nebraska in overcoming the Confederate break-out attempt (pages 138-141, in a letter to his parents; and another letter to his sister.) There is also a Letter of 25 March 1862 from Crump's Landing (of interest because Keen indicates the Army is under command of General C.F. Smith: shows how the word failed to trickle down to the troops.) Two letters from May 1862 reporting the action of the 1st Nebraska during Day 2 at Shiloh. And a surprising series of letters sent from Paducah and Corinth (late May to early June 1862), wherein Keen describes his 'detached duty at Paducah for Signals training.' (However, after he and his fellows were trained for duty with the Signal Corps, and reported for duty at Corinth, General Halleck ordered the Corps disbanded; and the men were returned to their former units...) Available here: http://www.nebraskahistory.org/publish/publicat/history/full-text/NH2000MyDuty.pdf (Letters of Private Thomas Keen, 1st Nebraska Infantry) Ozzy
  15. Tardy Earl?

    In The Life of Albert Sidney Johnston, page 525, it is recorded: 'After the Battle of Pea Ridge, General Van Dorn was ordered to Corinth.' Bentonville, Arkansas is about 300 miles from Helena (on the Mississippi River), and the battle concluded on March 8, 1862. Calculating an easy pace of fifteen miles per day, Van Dorn's force could have reached Helena by March 28... taken steamers to Memphis, arriving by March 31st... then train ride on the Memphis & Charleston, arriving at Corinth April 2-4. So, why didn't they? Apparently, much of the 'Van Dorn was ordered to Corinth' (the claim appears in Beauregard's Military Biography, page 346, too)... is a sham. But, let's start at the beginning: the first letter sent to General Earl Van Dorn, requesting he 'join his force with General Beauregard's on the Mississippi River, if possible,' was sent via Governor Isham Harris on March 7, 1862 (while the Battle of Pea Ridge was underway.) [OR Serial 8, page 771] Van Dorn replied on March 16: 'Your letter did not reach me until just a few days ago, on my return from the battlefield. I will start in a day or two for Pocahontas, Arkansas.' (OR Serial 8, page 784) [No obvious sense of urgency, because no haste was requested -- Ozzy.] On March 25, Albert Sidney Johnston reported to President Davis: 'Van Dorn has offered to send his force north to assist in the defense of Island No. 10, but I ordered him to Memphis.' [OR Serial 11, page 361] Meanwhile, Van Dorn directed his Army of the West to assemble at Pocahontas... then Jacksonport... then Des Arc, Arkansas (a port on the White River.) By early April, the gathering of Van Dorn's force was underway; Earl Van Dorn issued 'Special Orders No. 41' on April 7, directing that Sterling Price's Division commence the steamboat ride to Memphis on the morning of April 8 (and Van Dorn made the trip to Memphis, himself, and arrived about April 8... in time to receive the first message that expressed any urgency: 'General Beauregard requests that you hurry forward your command.' [OR Serial 11, page 398: message from Captain John Adams, post of Memphis, dated April 8, 1862.] On April 9, General Beauregard telegraphed to General Cooper at Richmond: 'Van Dorn may join us in Corinth in a few days with 15.000 more troops.' [OR Serial 11, page 403] On April 12, Sterling Price told Van Dorn: 'I have sent Colonel Little's Brigade to Corinth, and General Rust's command to Fort Pillow, by order of General Beauregard.' [OR Serial 11, page 414] [What this indicates to me, is the effort to defend the Mississippi River was as important to General Beauregard as the assembly of Rebels at Corinth. And the 'slow movement' of Van Dorn east allowed an opportunity to re-direct Van Dorn north... but the opportunity for Van Dorn to join the build-up at Corinth in a timely manner (before the Battle of Shiloh) was lost -- Ozzy.] In effect, Van Dorn had no opportunity to join the Army of the Mississippi, prior to the Battle of Shiloh: he was not tardy; he was never told to hurry, until it was too late. Ozzy References: Life of Albert Sidney Johnston, by Preston Johnston The Military Operations of General Beauregard, by Alfred Roman OR Serials 8 and 11
  16. A Tale of Two Maps

    Just for the sake of comparison, here is the Map used by Confederate Generals at the Battle of Shiloh (found in The Life of Albert Sidney Johnston, by William Preston Johnston (1878) page 558: And here is the map constructed for Henry Halleck, during the April/May 1862 advance on Corinth (found at the Library of Congress, and attributed to Colonel George Thom, Topographical Engineer): Obviously, someone had a lot more time on his hands... Regards Ozzy
  17. Still to ponder...

    Greetings from Down Under I'll start by wishing everyone a memorable visit to Shiloh NMP this 150th Anniversary of the 'Turnover at Liverpool' ...the completion of the Voyage of CSS Shenandoah, in November 1865. I was thinking of starting a discussion on a topic of interest, perhaps in a week or two, once the dust settles on the debrief of events from this latest Park Visit. Some of my ideas: US Grant and migraines: did he get them? If so, is it possible that he was suffering from a 'sick headache' at Shiloh?The movements of the 58th Illinois Infantry, April 6th 1862: just where were they, really?'Parole Camps: necessary, or evil?Oh, and a new historical novel will be out this month: Book Cover.pdf All the best Ozzy
  18. Ancestor Veterans (CSA)

    Let's start with Texas... There were three units from the Lone Star State, engaged at the Battle of Shiloh. The best sites I have uncovered, for beginning research on ancestors: http://www.nps.gov/civilwar/soldiers-and-sailors-database.htm (For all Texas soldiers, but especially those from the 2nd Texas Infantry Regiment: NPS Soldier and Sailor System. Input your ancestor's last name, along with his regiment number, and select <Show Results> ) http://gen.1starnet.com/civilwar/9thmain.htm (For 9th Texas Infantry, Scroll down to roster. Website provided by Ron Brothers and Tim Bell.) http://www.keathleywebs.com/terrysrangers/ (For 8th Texas Cavalry, aka 'Terry's Texas Rangers.' Website provided by keathleywebs.com) Ozzy
  19. The Hero of Shiloh

    Let's start with a question, IRT... tornadoes. Is the apparent increase in the number of tornadoes photographed, from one year to the next, mostly the result of an increase in the number of tornadoes; or are there more cameras in the hands of everyday citizens, which are then more readily available to be used to capture images, that would have been missed years ago? I begin this post with a weather question, because I believe a similar query can be posed IRT 'the heroes' of Shiloh. Does the difficulty in determining a 'Hero of Shiloh' lie in the fact that 1) all of the potential selectees possess un-hero-like qualities (flaws) that detract from/negate their positive achievements, or 2) we have over-examined potential heroes, and dug up flaws that would have been ignored/remained hidden in years past? Two examples: one of my Civil War heroes is Joshua Chamberlain. Another is Adam Slemmer. I am comfortable with their hero-status, and am hesitant to dig deeper into their stories, because I do not want to find out their hidden flaws. So... what about the Hero of Shiloh? Ozzy
  20. The Smoke of Battle

    One of the aspects of Civil War conflict, that must be seen to be believed: all those black powder weapons, letting loose... with their lingering effects, shrouding real-time developments on the battlefield. [Thanks to the 5th Ohio Lt Artillery re-enactors.] http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9bciquvOROU (Created by Robert Clements; posted on YouTube April 2nd, 2012) Ozzy
  21. While helping a friend on another website search for information about their ancestor (and Shiloh veteran), I ran across the following online site, run by the State of Illinois. It lists 'descriptive features' (age, height, hair color, eye color, occupation, etc) of all the Civil War soldiers enlisted in Illinois. Start by pressing [search]. In new window, in the 'Search Box,' place the soldier's name as such [Gregg, Patrick] or [Grant, U ] with 'comma' and 'space' separating last name from first name... and ignore boxes for 'Company' and 'Unit' as the search works fine without those entries. For those with ancestors from Illinois regiments... Cheers Ozzy http://www.cyberdriveillinois.com/departments/archives/databases/datcivil.html (Illinois Civil War soldiers)
  22. In case you have not seen it before, the following link registers the belief of the Confederate Secretary of State that the Battle of Shiloh was a Confederate victory. Contained in diplomatic message sent to London (from the book The Messages and Papers of Jefferson Davis and the Confederacy, published by James D. Richardson (in two volumes), by U. S. Publishing Co., Nashville, 1904, pages 233- 235.) Cheers Ozzy http://archive.org/stream/messagespapersof02conf#page/232/mode/2up
  23. Anyone attempting to research events on the far left of the Union line during April 6th, knows it is relatively easy to find references IRT the 55th Illinois. But, the activities of the other major player, the 54th Ohio (2nd Ohio Zouaves) are less abundantly documented. The Life and Letters of Thomas Kilby Smith, by his son, Walter George Smith, published by G. P. Putnam of New York, (1898), goes some way to addressing that deficiency. The book consists of two parts: a 'Memoir' (more of a biography) that discusses T. Kilby Smith's career during the Civil War, pages 10- 167; and 'Letters' that Smith wrote to his wife, mother and sister, usually within days of the event described (pages 167- 463). Because Smith was Colonel of the 54th Ohio, his experience is theirs, until they part company in July 1863, due to his promotion to Brigadier General. The following pages are of most interest: pp. 12- 22 arrival at Pittsburg Landing, thru to the Battle of Shiloh; p. 186 discussion of Zouave ideals; pp. 191- 2 'We are as safe here, as if we were in New York City' -- March 31st, 1862; pp. 193- 9 April 11th letters to wife, sister and mother, describing aspects of 54th OVI involvement; pp. 228- 9 July 1862 letter to mother with more details of Battle of Shiloh/ Flag of 54th OVI.After Shiloh, the Siege of Corinth, Occupation of Memphis, Arkansas Post, and Vicksburg Campaign are discussed. After parting company with the 54th OVI, the Red River Campaign, and Brigadier General Smith's assignment to Fort Gaines, near Mobile Alabama, are described. (In this latter segment of the book, the most interesting aspect, for me, was the description of 'land mines' encountered by Union forces under General Canby during the Assault on Spanish Fort, page 383- 4; I'd heard of the use of this weapon during the Civil War, but did not know at what battle it was employed.) The major strength of the book: the above indicated pages can be accessed online (free) at the below website, and read in about fifteen minutes. The major weakness: in a book of 460 pages, that is all there is IRT Battle of Shiloh. http://archive.org/stream/kilbysmiththomas00smitrich#page/n9/mode/2up Ozzy
  24. Shiloh on YouTube

    Over on YouTube, the 'Shelby Foote Fan Club' has finally gotten around to adding eight segments on the Battle of Shiloh, beginning with a discussion of the 'personality clash' between Halleck and Grant, Chapter 4, Part 12. Worth a look... created from the works of Shelby Foote. Ozzy
  25. Libby Prison, second only to Andersonville in the North for notoriety, was dismantled, brick by brick; and in a program emulated eighty years later at Lake Havasu, Arizona (involving London Bridge), the pieces were hauled halfway across the country by rail, and re-assembled in Chicago, in time for the Columbian Exposition of 1893, where it may have drawn more visitors than the Ferris Wheel. Maybe you already knew that... Unknown to most, is the connection to the Battle of Shiloh. Very few, if any, Federal prisoners taken during April 1862 at Shiloh were interred at Libby. However, in October 1862, the remaining Shiloh prisoners, two hundred officers and eight hundred enlisted men, on their way north 'on parole,' were halted at Libby for a day or two, to compare and confirm their 'descriptions' in the Prisoner Roll against their physical presence. Libby seems to have functioned as a 'clearing house,' the final check before Union men were permitted to complete the final hike: thirteen miles to the 'flag-of-truce' boat, John A. Warner, waiting for its precious cargo at Aiken's Landing. (It is believed tens of thousands of Federal prisoners passed through Libby during its years of operation.) For an informative, engaging four-minute video about Libby in Chicago, see <interactive.wttw.com/timemachine/libby-prison-and-coliseum> (found on the internet at 'Chicago Time Machine Libby') Other information from Wikipedia and A Perfect Picture of Hell (Genoways) 2001. Ozzy
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