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Found 2 results

  1. Libby Prison, second only to Andersonville in the North for notoriety, was dismantled, brick by brick; and in a program emulated eighty years later at Lake Havasu, Arizona (involving London Bridge), the pieces were hauled halfway across the country by rail, and re-assembled in Chicago, in time for the Columbian Exposition of 1893, where it may have drawn more visitors than the Ferris Wheel. Maybe you already knew that... Unknown to most, is the connection to the Battle of Shiloh. Very few, if any, Federal prisoners taken during April 1862 at Shiloh were interred at Libby. However, in October 1862, the remaining Shiloh prisoners, two hundred officers and eight hundred enlisted men, on their way north 'on parole,' were halted at Libby for a day or two, to compare and confirm their 'descriptions' in the Prisoner Roll against their physical presence. Libby seems to have functioned as a 'clearing house,' the final check before Union men were permitted to complete the final hike: thirteen miles to the 'flag-of-truce' boat, John A. Warner, waiting for its precious cargo at Aiken's Landing. (It is believed tens of thousands of Federal prisoners passed through Libby during its years of operation.) For an informative, engaging four-minute video about Libby in Chicago, see <interactive.wttw.com/timemachine/libby-prison-and-coliseum> (found on the internet at 'Chicago Time Machine Libby') Other information from Wikipedia and A Perfect Picture of Hell (Genoways) 2001. Ozzy
  2. For many men, the Battle of Shiloh did not end when the shooting stopped, and General Beauregard returned his forces to Corinth. Many thousands of soldiers on both sides were wounded; they required care and convalescence that took months and years for recovery. Some never recovered completely, making Shiloh their last direct involvement with the war. Others were taken as prisoners. For the 2200 Federals captured at the Hornet's Nest and Hell's Hollow, (and hundreds more taken across the battlefield), their incarceration began with a march to Corinth. At Corinth, they were packed onto trains and carried to locations throughout the South, including Memphis; Columbus, MS; Mobile; Cahaba; Tuscaloosa (several sites); Montgomery (several sites); Talladega; Madison; Atlanta; and Macon's Camp Oglethorpe. For hundreds of Confederates taken prisoner by the Union, the majority appear to have been shipped north on steamboats, transferred to the railroad at Cairo, and hauled to confinement at Camp Douglas, Chicago. Located just south of the city on land rumored to have been owned by Stephen Douglas (of the Lincoln-Douglas Debates), Camp Douglas began as a mustering-in center in 1861: at least eleven Illinois regiments began their existence at the site. After the massive number of POWs taken as a result of Fort Donelson, 'suitable' locations were required, and quickly, to house over 12000 men: primarily, these sites were Camp Morton; Camp Chase; and Camp Douglas (which took the majority.) Before the end of February 1862, the first prisoners arrived at Camp Douglas; before the end of the year, it had reached full capacity of nearly 9000 men. By the time it closed in mid-1865, Camp Douglas recorded 26000 prisoners as having 'passed through.' Available for viewing, via <familysearch.org> is the complete list of Confederate prisoners held at Camp Douglas after the Battle of Shiloh. The Mormon Church offers this family history information for free; in order to gain access, follow the following steps: on your favorite search engine, type 'Confederate Prisoner of War Records' [enter] [select] 'Confederate Prisoner of War Records - Family Search' [enter] in the light-blue box, labelled as 'Contents' select '2.1 Confederate Prisoners of War, 1861-1865' [enter] under 'Records of the National Archives - Confederate Prisoners' select the first dot-point 'United States, Records of Confederate Prisoners of War, 1861-1865 (familysearch)' [enter] under 'United States -- Records of Confederate Prisoners of War, 1861-1865' sub heading 'View images in this collection,' select 'Browse through 51,108 images' [enter] under 'Prisoner or Prison/Station Records' select from the second column 'IL, Camp Douglas, Military Prison' [enter] under 'Document type,' in the second column, the fourth item: 'Prisoner Registers, 1862, v. 192-194' [enter] Finally having opened the document, you will discover over 248 pages, 8800 names, listed alphabetically, and recording rank, regiment and company, where captured, when captured, and 'notes.' There appear to be several hundred prisoners from Shiloh; the others are from Fort Donelson and Island No. 10. Also on this site are records from other northern prisons. Familysearch.org also allows free searching of your family history, so it's a site worth spending time investigating. Cheers Ozzy Update: See Post No. 3, below, for easier access to prisoner records.
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