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Found 2 results

  1. It took a couple of days for word to reach the villages and farms in the North that a massive contest had taken place along the bank of the Tennessee River. And the initial reports seemed to indicate “another Union victory, with moderate casualties,” such as resulted for the Union at Fort Henry and Fort Donelson and Island No.10 …but after those initial reports, other stories began to appear, not just from embedded reporters, but letters and other eyewitness accounts from soldiers themselves, and these presented sensational details at odds with the initial rosy narrative. And these details grew progressively horrific: not hundreds of casualties, but thousands… maybe tens of thousands… Suddenly, Casualty Lists were in demand; but the Northern newspapers could not provide them. As occurred after Forts Henry and Donelson, the regional papers contacted Chicago for details… and were given only Chicago-specific lists of casualties. And the Horror of Shiloh continued, with full Casualty Lists never appearing in most Northern newspapers: the affected families were slowly and sporadically informed of the fate of their loved ones by mail: comrades of their sons and fathers who knew what happened (or thought they did); and official letters of condolence when facts could be positively determined. Meanwhile, the waiting, and not knowing, became almost intolerable… Unknown to the people in the North, one newspaper had taken extraordinary steps to compile a Master Casualty List of Wounded Men, and that paper was not in Chicago or Cincinnati, but St. Louis. Beginning with the April 15th edition, the Daily Missouri Republican published names of wounded men who arrived at St. Louis aboard the Hospital boat, D.A. January (two full columns on Page One.) And although Hospital boats Crescent City and City of Louisiana soon arrived at St. Louis, other boats pressed into service as floating Hospitals offloaded their human cargo at New Albany, Evansville, Cincinnati, Louisville, Paducah and Cairo; the Daily Missouri Republican “borrowed” reports from local papers of those river ports and repeated them on the pages of the St. Louis paper: • 17 APR page 3 Minnehaha wounded offloaded at Louisville (CSA and USA) • 18 APR page 1 John J. Roe casualties offloaded at Evansville • 19 APR page 1 War Eagle casualties arrived St. Louis • 19 APR page 2 Empress casualties arrived at St. Louis • 19 APR page 3 Magnolia casualties arrived Cincinnati • 20 APR page 1 Imperial casualties arrived St. Louis • 20 APR page 1 Black Hawk casualties arrived Cairo • 20 APR page 2 Tycoon casualties arrived 17 APR at Cincinnati • 20 APR page 2 Lancaster casualties arrived at Cincinnati • 20 APR page 2 B. J. Adams casualties arrived New Albany In addition, edition for 22 APR page 3 lists all of the Hospitals in St. Louis where the wounded men from Pittsburg Landing were housed. Shortly after his arrival at Pittsburg Landing, Henry Halleck sent a telegram to Brigadier General Strong at Cairo (15 APR 1862): “All the wounded have been sent to Hospital. Stop all sanitary commissions, nurses and citizens. We don’t want any more.” References: Daily Missouri Republican, issues 9 APR through 23 APR 1862 and available: https://digital.shsmo.org/digital/collection/dmr/id/15091/rec/3182 Missouri Daily Republican for 15 APR 1862 https://digital.shsmo.org/digital/collection/dmr/search/page/318 Access to all editions of Missouri Daily Republican at State Historical Society of Missouri Note: The first known reference published in the North referred to “an attack against our forces at Pittsburg Landing by Beauregard” went to print on 8 APR 1862 and was discredited as “a rumor from Paducah.” The second reference to the Battle of Pittsburg Landing was published 9 APR 1862 and was a telegram sent from Henry Halleck to SecWar Stanton on April 8, full contents of which: “The enemy attacked our forces at Pittsburg Tennessee yesterday (April 7) but was repulsed with heavy loss. No details given.” Further note: Beginning 15 APR 1862 the same editions of this newspaper contained names and details of Confederate prisoners captured at Battle of Pittsburg Landing and transported to St. Louis and elsewhere (initially aboard steamer, Woodfolk -- see page one, column 6.)
  2. Ozzy

    14th Iowa "diary"

    [from Clark County H.S.] Lewis Wells Sutton was born in Ohio in November 1839 and in about 1855 migrated with his Father Philip, Mother Elizabeth, and five brothers and sisters to Henry County, Iowa. The railroads at that time were advertising “cheap land,” the first bridge over the Mississippi River had been completed (with likelihood of a ribbon of steel soon reaching California), and the Sutton Family was certainly drawn to some of the richest farmland in America by the promise of a Golden Future. The eruption of War in 1861 put on hold the Dreams of the Future: Lewis (20) and his brother Jacob (18) enlisted in the 14th Iowa Volunteer Infantry, Company I, in October. Mustered in at Davenport, the 14th Iowa saw service at Fort Donelson with Lauman’s Brigade of C.F. Smith’s Second Division. And then moved on to Pittsburg Landing. And along the way, Lewis Sutton was promoted to Corporal. And the 14th Iowa (Colonel Shaw) was attached to Tuttle’s Brigade of C.F. Smith’s Second Division (but with General Smith away sick, the Division was under acting command of Brigadier General WHL Wallace, effective 2 April 1862.) And the under-strength 14th Iowa (Companies A and B were detached months earlier to fight Indians in Minnesota) recruited new members from the Union-supporting residents of Savannah. On Sunday morning, April 6th the 14th Iowa was marched south “toward the sound of the guns” and upon witnessing a distant hoard wearing butternut emerging from the trees below them, Colonel Tuttle directed the 14th Iowa to line along a trail to the ESE along the top of the slope. When fully deployed, the regiment almost connected with the 500 remaining men of General Prentiss’s Sixth Division (Prentiss soon to be reinforced by the 23rd Missouri in a position to become known as The Thicket.) And the 8th Iowa was detached from Sweeny’s Brigade to fill the gap between Prentiss and the 14th Iowa. After holding the position nearly eight hours, the 14th Iowa Infantry was surrendered by Colonel Shaw (with Corporal Sutton one of those captured.) In October 1862 Lewis Sutton (along with all the surviving Shiloh Prisoners) was released from confinement at Camp Oglethorpe (Macon, Georgia) and returned to Union lines; and in early 1863 the reformed 14th Iowa returned to duty. The loss of men due to battle and disease resulted in promotion of veteran soldiers: Lewis Sutton gained advancement to Sergeant Major. And for the remainder of his enlistment, Sergeant Major Sutton assisted the Regimental Adjutant with keeping the Ledger of the 14th Iowa: Muster rolls, casualty lists, record of significant occurrences… it reads like a diary. Lewis Sutton’s enlistment expired end of 1864 and he returned to Iowa, and eventually went into business at Mount Pleasant, and then at Ottumwa. In 1893 Mr. Sutton relocated his family to Vancouver Washington, established a business, and lived out the rest of his life (Lewis Sutton died July 1914 at the age of 75.) Fifty years later, Lewis Sutton’s granddaughter donated his Civil War materials to the local historical society (Clark County Washington Historical Society.) The brown leather satchel containing Sergeant Major Sutton’s materials was stored in the basement… and it appears no one bothered to investigate the contents until 2011. And even in 2011, they did not realize what they had in their possession (calling it “Lewis Sutton’s Diary.”) It is actually the Regimental Ledger for the 14th Iowa Infantry, and should have gone into the Official Records storage of the War Department after the Civil War ended. But, somehow, Sergeant Major Sutton ended up with it. And it is now in the possession of the Clark County Historical Society. Why is this important? Most researchers never see a Regimental Ledger, or what it contains (these Ledgers are now kept by NARA and are difficult for interested parties to access.) This particular 14th Iowa Ledger should contain the names of all the Savannah Tennessee men recruited into service before the Battle of Shiloh. And the Ledger provides an excellent example of how the Casualty List was maintained. References: https://www.columbian.com/news/2011/jul/19/donated-satchel-yields-writings-of-a-civil-war-sol/ Lewis Sutton's diary https://www.columbian.com/news/2014/apr/02/clark-county-historical-museum-civil-war-exhibit/ 2014 exhibition at Clark County H.S. of Vancouver Washington https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/139406853 Lewis Wells Sutton 14th Iowa Infantry Co.I
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