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Ron

John Rea Farm

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The farmer John Rea and his family do not appear in the 1860 US census for Civil District 10 or 15. This is the farm that was involved in the early fighting. Sherman was wounded in this field. Colonel Appler and the 54th Ohio did very poorly here and rushed from the field. Who owned the farm or was living on the land at the time of the battle? Actually I knew that John Rhea (Rea) died in 1848 and his wife Jincy (Joicy) continued living on the property until she died in 1854. Two of the Rea daughters married before the 1860 census, Joanna to Levi Howell and Elizabeth M to John A Campbell. It is said that the couples lived on and worked the farm. The first mystery is that the census shows only John A Campbell, his wife Emily (Elizabeth) and a son L G, together with one male slave age 12, living on the property. No mention is made of Levi Howell and his wife Johanna. My first thought was that Lvi and Johanna left the farm or left the area. But the note in Larry Daniel's book on page 352, note 49 tends to indicate that the Levi and Johanna was still in the area at time of 1860 census and the battle, since Johanna died in 1895 and was buried in the Shiloh Church Cemetary. Since this info gives no proof, it can be assumed that the Campbells lived on the Rea farm and the Howells may have still been in the area but not counted in the 1860 census. Anybody have info about the Rea's, Campbells or the Howells?

Ron

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one book i cant remember which may have been Swords said he had two daughters living there at the time with their husbands and that Mr. Rhea died while going to the spring for water in 1848

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Ron, try this link for some information on Levi and Joannah (more on him than her): https://familysearch...M9.2.1/S1WQ-KV3

I'm not sure how reliable the information is, but check out the "Notes" section near the bottom of the page for a few interesting tidbits, including:

1. "L.J." and "Joannah" are in the 15th district in the 1880 census.

2. "[Levi] [f]ought with the Confederate Army with his brother, David in Newson's (sic) 18th Tennessee Cavalry."

3. "During the battle of Shiloh, Grant burned one of Levi's farms. A few years later the Government bought the Howell land as well as the Rhea land. Rhea Springs on the park is named for Rhea's farm. The Widow Howell Field is Levi's old home place which is also on the Federal Park. Most of Levi's children moved to McNairy County around 1898."

Hope this helps,

John

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Hello John,

Another piece of the puzzle falls in place. Thank you again, very much. More information and this shows (or proves) Levi and Johanna were in the area when the 1860 census was taken. Don't know exactly where they were. I have added this information to my list of Shiloh civilians.

Ron

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Apparently several of the local men were in Newsom's regiment. My great grandfather, W.P. Wood, who lived at the 'Two Cabins' site, was also in Newsom's 18th Tennessee cavalry.

Was down in McNairy county last Saturday. I drove the length of Sulphur Springs Rd. between hwy 57 and hwy 64. This road is supposedly the road where Fielding Hurst hanged Confederates every mile along the road. It's a nice drive through pretty countryside, if you can forget what happened there.

Grandpa

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Hello Grandpa,

Thanks for your post but what you mention is so sad. Its hard to believe. This civil war generated hard feelings between both sides with no one to control it. In reading about the local civilians, my eyes were opened to the dangers and difficulties they suffered and went through. This new found understanding makes me even more curious about who they were, what they did, what happened to them and where did they go. A hard life on the Shiloh Hill became even worse.

Time heals.

Ron

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Yes, Ron. We've spent much of our lives studying the operations of the formal military only to discover that the armies were just a small part of all that went on during the war. The civilians are at least as interesting as anything else.

And yes, Grandpa, Newsom's cavalry must have included a lot of local men. At least a couple of my relatives were in it. Also, (I hope Jim doesn't see this...) but I had relatives on both sides of the local goings on. Three of my g-g-g-uncles rode with Fielding Hurst. It's a miracle that my grandparents married each other.

John

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Ron, Here's another tidbit. Could Levi Howell have been listed in the 1860 census as "Lee Jordan Howell"? Again, I'm not sure of the quality of the information, but I found it at this link: http://archiver.root...0-02/0950898454

Brothers living in Hardin Co. Tenn 1860

Benjamin Franklin Howell - 154th Tenn. Inf. ; Polks Corps; KIA middle tenn;

Lee Jordan Howell - Co. F, Newsom's Regt, 18th Tenn Cav; Bells Brig.

N.B. Forrests Cav. Corps

Doctor Raney Howell- Newsom's 18th Tenn Cav as above

David Howell - 38th Tenn Inf

John

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Jim, just don't start putting "damnyankee" in front of my name. In my family, Confederates soldiers out-numbered Yankees about 8 to 1. Although, I will have to say the Yankees were pretty colorful.

John

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John and Jim,

Your exchange of notes about the Damnyankees and the Webels prompts me to put in my one cent worth. I stated earlier that if a war broke out again (Heaven forbid) that I would remain north in Battery M, 1st Michigan Light Artillery. This despite my strong feeling for the confederacy during the civil war. I now have to amend that statement by now deciding that I would not go south, not go north but instead, would volunteer my services as a neutral mediator. Failing that, then I would join the civilian medical services.

Now, I ask you, "How is that for straddling the fence"?

Ron

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Oh JIm: Your comment did bring forth a chuckle! :rolleyes:

I would wish that this country or no other would ever feel the need to travel down the path toward civil war again where the suffering and privation of all had to be unspeakable and incomprehensible - to me at least. I do not think any of us who have not been there can understand the unspeakable horror of the battle field and the battle aftermath to soldiers and civilians alike. It is a sorry statement of reality that some soldiers on both sides acted in a manner unbecoming to either an officer or a gentlemen.

I was Antietam last friday - my day working at the bookstore - and walked out behind the Visitors Center before going inside. Some how there is a presence of others on battlefields even though no one else seems to be around in the flesh anyway - which brings to mind one of my favoritest (good word) quotes by a man named Lawrence Joshua Chamberlain:

"In great deeds something abides. On great fields something stays. Forms change and pass; bodies disappear, but spirits linger, to consecrate ground for the vision-place of souls. And reverent men and women from afar, and generations that know us not and that we know not of, heart-drawn to see where and by whom great things were suffered and done for them, shall come to this deathless field to ponder and dream; And lo! the shadow of a mighty presence shall wrap them in its bosom, and the power of the vision pass into their souls."

Speaking at the dedication of the Monument to the 20th Maine

October 3, 1889, Gettysburg, PA

PS: To the uninitiated, as we say here at Antietam, Gettysburg is that little crossroads town in Pennsylvania where there was a small skirmish in early July 1863 - nothing of major significance however. :P

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I asked a question concerning who lived on the Rea farm at the time of the Battle of Shiloh and here is my best guess answer. This is based on all of the helpful info provided in the post plus a little other info. I believe that John A Campbell, his wife Elizabeth M and their son L G lived on the Rea farm with one male slave. See residence number 166-05 on page 160 of the 1860 census of District 10 of Hardin county TN. I further believe that Levi Howell and his wife Joanna lived on the Howell farm on the Purdy road. Joanna Howell and Elizabeth M Campbell were Rea sisters. I also believe that the Rea farm buildings as well as the Howell farm building were destroyed in the battle. I'm going with this as a best possible answer but I would still like further info. If I wrong, set me strait (Believe me, need all the help I can get). Ron

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My 2nd great-grandfather obituary stated, "Mr. Matthews was born March 15, 1847, on what is known as the John Rea farm, 
near Bagnell". Is this the same place mention in the obituary statement?

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My 2nd great-grandfather obituary stated, "Mr. Matthews was born March 15, 1847, on what is known as the John Rea farm, near Bagnell". Is this the same place mention in the obituary statement?

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i dont know..have not ever heard of a location in shiloh area  know as bagwell...but will ask around.

 

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