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Richard

Sgt. Rudolph Ulrich Heimberger 9th Illinois Infantry Co. E & F

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Hello all,

I am the gg grandson of Color Sgt. Rudolph U. Heimberger, 9th Illinois Infantry Co. E & F. He was born 1838 in Mascoutah, Illinois. He served under Lt. Loren Webb. The city of Mascoutah had around 450 men join the Union Army. Rudolph was mustered out 20 August, 1864 after serving under Gen. Sherman in the Battle of Atlanta as his last action. He survived 63 actions in total, 17 listed as severe, with no known wounds. The early picture is at age 23. The color treatment begs the question, what and how to me? The later picture is at age 77. I am here to research men from Mascoutah, Illinois that served in the 9th Illinois Infantry. Rudolphs participation at Shilo is of great interest to me. It is my pleasure to meet you all.

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Welcome Richard. The colored one looks as if it might be a painting. There was a Lt. James Oates that fought with the 9th IL that I've always suspected I'm related to, but I can't prove it. The 9th was pretty active at Shiloh. That's probably why I've tried to claim him.

Jim

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Hey Jim,

Thank you kindly. I appreciate the input on the color picture. I am here to learn. I did not know what to make of a color image from this time period. I thought it might be a treatment, of the day, to enhance a photograph. Rudolph was raised by his grandfather who was a doctor. I imagine grandfather could have had a painting done.

The men in Mascoutah were all Germans. There were German shops and "English" shops. This did not change until WW1. Officers in the 9th Illinois were not necessarily Germans. I will check on this gentleman and see what I can find for you.

I noticed the images I posted were downloaded quite a few times. Is it a common practice here to collect photographhs? Typically, Rudolph would write on the white stripes; One God-One Flag-One Country and then his full name. I invite anyone who may have one like this to contact me.

As I look at accounts of the Battle of Shilo I see no specific information about the 9th Illinois Infantry. Could you suggest a good read? Thanks for your time.

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Welcome to the group, Richard.

On the downloads, that simply indicates how many times the images have been clicked on and opened. They're good pictures. The colorized version looks to me like it might be a painting or a sketch of a photograph. I'd lean toward it being a sketch, but it's hard to be sure.

The 9th Illinois was located on the east side of the Peach Orchard for most of the day on April 6th, over in the ravines. (To the left of the Peach Orchard as you're facing toward the south.) They took a tremendous hit during the large-scale Confederate assault around 2:00 in the afternoon, and suffered a higher casualty rate than any other Union regiment in the battle. But they also helped to stave off the southerners on that side of the field for several hours prior to that attack. Had that line collapsed sooner than it did, it could have been disastrous for Grant's army.

Here's a link to an overview of their brigade's action at Shiloh -

http://shilohbattlefield.org/commission/Pages/Tennessee/WHLWallace/mcarthur.htm

At the bottom of the page you'll see links to the different regiments comprising the brigade, including the 9th. That link will take you to a page where you can view each position marker & monument related to the 9th. Just click the link to see each marker/monument. Clicking on the link that says, "View Picture Here" will also give you a close-up of the marker/monument, and let you read the text that goes with it.

Also, you'll notice map coordinates on the description for each marker. If you do a copy-and-paste of those coordinates into an online map program, it will show you the approximate location inside the park.

Also, here's a picture I happened to take of the 9th Illinois monument a few years ago, on the anniversary of the battle. Note the small flag that someone left in front of the monument -

9th Illinois Monument, Shiloh

And here's an impressive Keith Rocco painting about the 9th Illinois at Shiloh -

"Plenty of Fighting Today": The 9th Illinois at Shiloh by Keith Rocco

That should get you started some. ;)

Perry

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Hey Perry,

Thank you kindly. I appreciate the information on the 9th Illinois. The photograph of the monument is the first time I have seen it. I most likely will visit the park at some point. My first priority is to see Fort Defiance in Cairo, Illinois. The painting by Keith Rocco is known to me. I found it moving to see a smaller man depicted as the Color Sergeant. Rudolph was 5' 4 1/2. The German community in Mascoutah was vehemently opposed to slavery. The 9th Illinois fought well, in part, due to the fact they were neighbors & friends. I believe this is true of many units, on both sides. Where is the exact location of the "hornets nest" where Gen. Prentiss was in command? Thanks for your time.

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You're welcome, Richard. I'd highly recommend a visit to the park, if and when you get the chance. It's a worthwhile visit.

On the location of the Hornet's Nest, basically speaking, it's the wooded area between Duncan Field and the Peach Orchard. Prentiss's men were located about in the center of those woods, along the Sunken Road.

We've had some debates on here about exactly what area constitutes the Hornet's Nest. Some of us (me!) tend to apply a broader definition that includes Duncan Field. Others think it should properly be applied only to a certain area inside those woods.

But, on the map below, if you located Duncan Field and Sarah Bell's Cotton Field, the thin line you see connecting the two fields represents the Sunken Road, where it runs through the Hornet's Nest. Prentiss's men would have been located about where you see the small creek intersecting that road, above the Davis Wheatfield. Here's the map, courtesy of CivilWarLandscapes. You'll need to scroll down some to find the right area....

http://civilwarlands...ay1/camps_r.htm

Here's another page from that same site, with some pictures along the Sunken Road, and some information about the Hornet's Nest....

http://civilwarlands.../ftour/1hnf.htm

You can also zoom in pretty close on this area using Bing maps or Google maps, and get a pretty decent look at things, even though the woods do obscure a lot. But those maps are a great way to "visit" the park online.

Incidentally, on the first map above, if you locate Perry Field toward the top of the map and look just to the right of it, you'll find the campsite for the 9th Illinois. Click on the little blue icon for their regiment, and it will pull up a picture of the marker and a little bit of the area behind it, to the west.

Perry

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Good job Perry. You always find the best maps. Richard, when looking for Prentiss, look for Peabody (1st Brigade) and Miller (2nd Brigade). What these maps don't show is that the 16th WI (Peabody's Brig., Prentiss Div.) were in the Hornets Nest during the 1st attack. They were where the Eastern Corinth Rd. intersects the Sunken Rd./Hornets Nest. When Tuttle's Brig./Wallace's Div. came up, they replaced the 16th, which was out of ammo.

Jim

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Hey Jim,

Thanks for the search tips.

I looked at James Oates on the Illinois C.W. records search. James was a resident of Spingfield, Illinois and 25 years old. It shows he was 5'5", auburn hair, hazel eyes, light complexion. It further states he was a blacksmith from Yorkshire, Halifax, England. His rank was Sergeant. Promoted to 2nd, then 1st Lieutenant. James Oates was mustered out 20 August, 1864 in Springfield, Illinois, same day as Rudolph. His marital status is listed as single for the duration of the war.

The Illinois Statewide Marriage Index shows one James Oates. He married Alice Payne 1897-11-16 licence number 270066 in Cook County. There are three other Oates, James listed. James E., James R., and James W.. This may/may not be of help.

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Thanks Richard. Popped my bubble. My grandfather, Co. I, 16th WI, came from St. Clair, County Cornwall. Not the same family. Darn.

I'm pretty sure I'm not related to Col. William Oates of Gettysburg fame, also.

Jim

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Hi Richard,

I share your interest in the 9th Illinois. Most of the regiment did have a German backround and many did not speak fluent English. My focus has been on Lt. Colonel Jesse J. Phillips. He started as Captain of Co. H, was made Major, Lt. Colonel and sometimes brigade commander.

 

He was a non-German lawyer from Hillsboro, IL. Later, after the war, he became a judge and was then elected to the Illinois Supreme Court on which he served as chief justice. His career as a soldier is well told by regimental Chaplain Marion Morrison, who wrote the history of the 9th Illinois. Morrison was also the grandfather of the late actor, John Wayne. Also see "Peter Cozzens, "My Poor Little Ninth: The Ninth Illinois at Shiloh," Illinois Historical Journal, 1990." Tom Doyle

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Hello Idaho Native,

Thank you kindly for the link and reply.

Hello Tom Doyle,

Thanks for your reply. I saw Phillips mentioned in an online book in reference to my g grandfather Herman R. Heimberger. This is from Courts and Lawyers of Illinois page 1007.

HoN HERMAN R HE1MBERGER St Clair County esteemed Herman R Heimberger as one of its ablest lawyers a man of sound learning and measuring up to the best traditions of the profession During a practice of twenty years at Belleville Mr Heimberger was frequently honored by public office and has represented his district in the State Legislature Herman R Heimberger was born in St Clair County at Belleville November 2 1870 a son of RU and Anna Herman Heimberger His father was born in Illinois and his mother in Germany coming to America in childhood and reared and educated in Illinois where she married RU Heimberger The latter was for many years engaged in the mercantile business at Belleville and was also a popular traveling salesman During the Civil war he saw thirtynine months of service as color bearer in Companies E and F of the Ninth Illinois Regiment His first colonel was Judge Jesse J Phillips and later Augustus Mersey commanded the regiment R U Heimberger is still a resident of Illinois at Fayetteville in St Clair County at the age of seventy five and the mother is now sixty nine years old They were the parents of four children

I think I may have seen your name before too. I read a lot. Thank you, nice to meet you.

Hello Pumpkinslinger,

Thanks for your reply. As a student of history, I am not aware of the hats worn by the 9th Illinois Infantry. Could not say if you are right or wrong, sir. Please enlighten me. Thanks.

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I think it was the 9th Illinois that was portrayed at Shiloh in "Fiery Trial" as wearing either Balmorals or Glengarrys, can't remember which. Might have been the 55th though.

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Hello all,

I just found Marion Morrison's book available at Barnes & Noble in paperback (1st edition). I called my local Barnes & Noble and ordered a copy. It will be here in 4-6 days. I expect to pay around $20 when I pick it up. It is available online as well.

In my search for information on Rudolph U. Heimberger, I found my 4th cousin. They are in possession of Rudolph's personal mementos intended for his first grandson. This would have been my grandfather. Somehow, this never happened. I am told it includes his Civil War diary. Once I review this material, I may be able to share some of it here. Included is a tintype image of my ggg grandfather Gustavus Heimberger from the Mexican War. He was a 2nd Lt. in the One Regiment of Foot Louisiana and Gen. James Sheild's personal interpreter. Gustavus is pictured in uniform, wearing his sword and holding a Colt Walker revolver. Quite the find for someone who has no clue of what they are doing. I found this stuff by accident.

Pumpkinslinger,

The 9th Illinois complained their commanding officer could not speak English, so he was replaced. My personal thought is German's would not willingly wear Balmorals or Glengarrys. I'm still looking into this.

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Hey Jim,

I will have to travel over 1,000 miles to see my gg grandfathers mementos. They are going into a museum in Illinois if all goes well. Once I get there, I will know more.

Hey Grandpa,

What really strikes me is that Rudolph's things were kept intact from the time he died (1920) to the time they were rediscovered (around 1980). The fact that they survived at all is amazing unto itself.

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Hi Jim,

The Illinois State Museum in Springfield, Illinois would be a likely condidate. My ggg grandmothers (Maria LaFontaine) piano & sewing machine are already there on display. They were donated by my great aunt Ethelyn Boyd. Ethelyn passed at age 102 not too long ago. She was a teacher & world traveler. Ethelyn knew Rudolph, I only spoke to Ms. Boyd once when she was 9damn5. I got family history from her in the oral tradition. That got me started.

The Heritage Museum in Mascoutah, Illinois would be another possibility. They were of great help to me. They are doing a Civil War tribute, in 2014, to the men of Mascoutah & the 9th Illinois Infantry. Since Rudolph was the first child born in Mascoutah, lived in the area, and part of a founding family they are very interested. The town of Mascoutah, is right next to Scott Air Force Base.

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I found these at the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library & Museum in Springfield Illinois. The origin of the color sketch I have, seems to be this photograph. The reverse side reads;

Front: R.U. Heimberger, Color Sergt. 9 Ill. Inf [lower right corner missing]; Back: Mascoutah, Ill, I was born in Mascoutah Ills. from noble parentage (Germans) Dec. 29th 1838. My father was also a patriot for this country & served in the 3rd. La. Regiment and lost the use of his left arm near Tampico in Mexican War by gun shot wound. I enlisted in the 9th Ills Regt Inf. under old Abrahams call & served in [?] 3 years & 3 months & the latter 3 years as bearer of said Regtl. banner of said Regiments. History will show the balance. Yours. R.U. Heimberger [lower right corner missing]

My book arrived last week. It was less than $20. Thanks again for all the help and information.post-340-0-13788900-1366846385_thumb.jpgpost-340-0-81005200-1366846424_thumb.jpg

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Hi Jim,

The Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum has a searchable database called "Boys in Blue". I see they have 3 photographs of James Oates, 9th Illinois Infantry, Co. K on file. These photographs came to the library in the 1950's from the Gen. John A. Logan collection. He was going to put his Civil War veteran photographs in a Memorial Hall. The hall never got built so they wound up in Springfield, Illinois.

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