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Butler56

Cyrus Ballard, 54th OVI

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Ozzy, I've been fortunate to live in a state where those who were here 150 years ago felt it necessary to preserve the record of the war. One such is Edwin B. Quiner. He published a wonderful huge book called The Military History of Wisconsin in the War for the Union. He called collected a scrapbook of newspaper articles that is in the possession of  the WI Historical Society and it's online:

http://content.wisconsinhistory.org/cdm/ref/collection/quiner/id/18666

 

I've also been through the local papers of 150 years ago,including the Janesville papers.They are entertaining, but usually weak in accuracy. I've also been thru Grant's Papers, but don't remember the item you referenced. I will go looking for it online, but can't seem to access it right now. Charter Internet has been having problems.

 

Jim

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Jim

 

I agree: Quiner's scrapbook collection and writings are most impressive. Iowa's best historians of the Civil War are, arguably, David W. Reed and Franc Bangs Wilkie. 

 

In regards to that Papers of U. S. Grant, volume 5 reference, the directive is recorded on page 422. The 'Special Muster' would have been conducted on August 18th (as it was with the 54th Ohio) or a few days later. Thought it might provide a time John Oates had definitely returned, or not, to the 16th WI.

 

Ozzy

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To all Shiloh Discussion Group Members:

 

Bruce departs soon on a visit to Ohio ancestral sites, and will stop at the Archives (called Ohio History Connection) in Columbus. He would appreciate any suggestion of records to request, in order to advance his search for Cyrus Ballard, or other family members.

 

We've all had that one breakthrough, when searching for 'lost' family members. What was the one search technique that worked for you?

 

Ozzy

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Much like the NARA records, my trip to the Ohio History Connection confirmed some of the things I knew, but nothing new.  I learned as much at the Grove City public library taught me almost as much in two hours as I learned in the State Archives in two days.   As Ozzy / Mike says "Still searching!"

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All SDG members:

 

Bruce is still looking for proof, regarding Cyrus Ballard's burial location. (I am still looking for a relative: John Clendenen, 6th Iowa Cavalry, died from wounds in 1864 in Dakota Territory.) Meanwhile, stumbled upon a site, run by the U.S. Department of Veteran's Affairs, that (supposedly) lists every known burial site, of every known U.S. war veteran. I've tried it, and had a few successes... though still looking for Cyrus and John. Site link is below:

 

http://gravelocator.cem.va.gov/index.html

 

Cheers

 

Ozzy

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It has neither my Grandfather's nor my Father's. Fortunately, It also doesn't have mine, although there are two with the first, last and middle initial as mine, I really am feeling fine and the report of my grave(s) having been found are greatly exaggerated!

Jim

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Spelling is important on the VA grave locator site. Although it provides an option for 'Starts with,' I tried seven different spellings of 'Thomas Clendenin' before a result came back. Since that success, I have received results for two-out-of-three attempts.

 

This is the site:  http://gravelocator.cem.va.gov/index.html

 

Ozzy

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For Jim

 

Did these men of the 16th Wisconsin get accepted for service aboard Foote's Gunboats?

 

http://digital.library.msstate.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/USG_volume/id/17403/rec/1  [Papers of US Grant, vol. 4, note 3]

 

[scroll up to 'Vol 4 - 115 - page 75']

 

Seems to be in answer to request [top of page 233 OR (Navy)]

 

http://ebooks.library.cornell.edu/cgi/t/text/pageviewer-idx?c=moawar&cc=moawar&idno=ofre0024&node=ofre0024%3A3&view=image&seq=255&size=100

 

 

 

Ozzy

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I have no idea if these men transferred Oz. I have found where 2 men transferred from the 16th to Munich's 1st MN Battery, which fought with or next to the 16th from Shiloh thru most of the war.

 

Jim

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While trying to find out whether members of the 16th Wisconsin transferred to 'Gunboat Service,' I ran across two other Wisconsin soldiers, confirmed as having made the switch: Private Ole Oleson, 2nd Wisconsin, Co. E, on gunboat service after February 1862 aboard USS Mound City; and Private John R. Burgoyne, 5th Wisconsin, Co. B, recorded as 'transferred to Western Gunboat Service.'

 

Another online reference lists all the known soldiers of Norwegian ancestry, who served during the Civil War: quite a few with Wisconsin, Illinois and Iowa regiments; and several switched to Gunboat Service.

 

http://vesterheim.org/CivilWar/db/o/ole/

 

 

Ozzy

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Bruce

 

Although I check every week for new information IRT Cyrus Ballard, I have uncovered nothing interesting... until now. Will attach link explaining Pentagon intention to 'identify all unknown soldiers in National Cemeteries.'  If Cyrus is buried at Mound City, this could be the way to confirm/disprove his presence. [Although this article focuses on Pearl Harbor, other reports I have read indicate 'this is just the start of a comprehensive program.']

 

Regards

 

Ozzy

 

http://www.military.com/daily-news/2015/04/15/pentagon-orders-exhumation-of-unknown-uss-oklahoma-remains.html     (Pearl Harbor dead to be identified)

 

 

N.B.  For general information: the British Commonwealth began exhuming and identifying war dead from the First World War over five years ago. A recent exhumation of a mass grave at Fromelles (fought in 1916) has resulted in identification of over 140 of 250 unknown soldiers, with DNA matching continuing.

 

http://www.theaustralian.com.au/in-depth/anzac-day/more-fromelles-diggers-named/story-e6frgdao-1226041391949     (Report from 2011)

 

http://www.army.gov.au/our-work/unrecovered-war-casualties-army/fromelles/the-fromelles-project     (The Australian Army Fromelles Project)

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Bruce

There has been recent activity (2016) on find-a-grave for Henrietta Willing (distant relatives making contact with Memorial Manager, Jeanne VM Borsani) with potential to find others with connection to Henrietta (and Cyrus?)

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=mr&MRid=47167187   Borsani contact at find-a-grave (scroll down the record of folks leaving messages, including Mr. Gregg)

All the best

Ozzy

 

 

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Just for the sake of the exercise, the attached link is the entry for Private Thomas Clendennen (my G-G-uncle) the eldest of three sons who fought for the Union during the War of the Rebellion. Captured with most of the 12th Iowa in Hell's Hollow (along with cousins Squire C. Fishel and George McKinnis) he endured captivity in Montgomery Cotton shed and Macon's Camp Oglethorpe; was returned north "on his Parole" in October 1862, and confined with 600 other Shiloh survivors at Camp Parole, Annapolis Maryland. The records I got from NARA indicate he died of typhoid fever on November 3rd 1862, and was buried in what became the National Cemetery at Annapolis.

I post the above to show others what is often required to find relatives on find-a-grave (or at cemeteries, in general): misspelling of last name; incorrect death date on headstone. Often, the entry begins "PVT" or Sergeant, and the search only is successful if PVT or Sergeant is included with the search terms. The Department of Veterans' Affairs created the find-a-grave entry for "Thos Clendenin" in the year 2000 but we only discovered it in 2013.

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSln=Clend&GSiman=1&GScid=109386&GRid=499339&  

Ozzy

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Bruce

Don't know if you found it yet, but here's Cyrus Ballard's son, Carl, at find-a-grave (with Ohio Death Certificate included.) Entry created by V. Blatherwick in 2014 (with significant additions made by Kuhn (Krumm) Family in 2016.)

All the best

Ozzy

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=123469389  Charles "Carl" Ballard at find-a-grave

 

 

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Bruce

Have recently been introduced to a document (or series of documents) that may hold the key to Cyrus Ballard's final resting place: Major E. B. Whitman's Final Report (1869). Likely held at the National Archives in Washington, D.C., the document records four years of effort after the end of the Civil War, to track down all Union soldier remains in the Southern States and relocate them to National Cemeteries.

According to those who have seen the document, Major Whitman kept meticulous notes in regard to original burial location, any identifying markers (such as wooden headboards), grave goods found with the remains (such as rings, watches and pocket knives). If the remains could be identified, they were; and a marker was provided with the soldier's identity at the National Cemetery. If the soldier's identity could not be verified, he was buried in the National Cemetery (with all possible clues indicating his identity recorded by Major Whitman) but with his headstone indicating "Unknown."

The good news: if Cyrus Ballard's remains were recovered, that circumstance (with date, original location of grave, and final resting place) are recorded in "Whitman's Final Report." The bad news: Cyrus Ballard was either recorded as one of tens of thousands of soldiers labelled as "Unknown" ...or his body still remains in the South, undiscovered by the Whitman Burial Team. (I am attempting to track access to this record via the Internet, but it may only be accessible at the National Archives in Washington.)

All the best

Ozzy

References:    http://www.cem.va.gov/cem/history/timeline/timeline-1869.asp  Cover Page of "Report of bvt-LtCol E.B. Whitman"

 http://www.archivesfoundation.org/documents/whitmans-report-cemeteries-shiloh-illustration/   Whitman's Final Report (1869)

http://www.cem.va.gov/cem/pdf/InterpretiveSigns/CorinthNationalCemetery.pdf  Major Whitman's involvement with Corinth

SDG topic "Shiloh Memorial Park" posts of 6 and 7 SEP 2018.

SDG topic "The Division that never Was" post of 6 SEP 2018 by Hank.

 

 

 

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