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Butler56

Cyrus Ballard, 54th OVI

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Ozzy, the WI web sites are great. What is even better is to go up Madison to the 3rd floor of the Vet's museum and the 4th floor of the Historical Society's buildings to their archives room. I've held the hand written Shiloh report of Col. Allen, 16th WI. Thanks for the links.

 

Jim

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I'm too new to have too many favorite web sites.  I have found find a grave to be helpful, but right now I am always looking for more, especially in Ohio and Pennsylvania.

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In reply to Ozzy's question about the difference between a Form 85 report and a Form 86, I ordered both for my GG, I can share my findings (or the actual reports) when I get them.

 

Before you start thinking I won the lottery, I already ordered the 'wrong' and more expensive form, but the stuff I think I really want, Civil War wise, is on the cheaper form.  And unlike Cyrus Ballard, this is not an uncle or cousin, but my GG.

 

Bruce

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For the rookies out there like me, I obviously made a mistake on another relative that came up with a negative search.  I am virtually 100 positive he served as I wrote.  What did I do wrong?

 

Bruce

 

 

 

 

post-122-0-07385100-1406906186_thumb.png

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Bruce

 

I had a quick look at your application, and I think I see the problem...

 

First, an explanation: the National Archives makes use of the NPS 'Soldier and Sailor System' records to commence a search. I do not see the microfilm number or roll number on your Form 86 request. (It is to be entered in the 'Comments' section: I know... they don't tell you on the form...)

 

The good news: there is not supposed to be any charge for a search that produces NO RESULT. The better news: John Glossinger is listed on the NPS.gov database, his name is spelled correctly, according to NARA, and he was in the 74th OVI Co. B. His film number is 'M552 Roll 39'

 

Adding this information should produce a result. (Also, what is it that expires '3-31-2014' in the 'Order Details: Compiled Military Service File' box?)

 

Ozzy

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Bruce

 

Just to bring you up to date on my quest for Cyrus Ballard. (Still no luck with a cemetery record.)

 

I've gone back and had another look at the U.S. Civil War Draft Registration Records, 1863-1865, available through ancestry.com. Cyrus Ballard is recorded on page 36/725 in volume 4/4 (erroneously listed as a member of 58th OVI.) The important aspect of this book: it did not list dead men. And, since we know the records of serving residents of Ohio were completed by March 3rd, 1863, and assuming two months were required to gather and collate the data, it can be reasonably assumed that Cyrus Ballard was alive in December 1862. Coupled with Henrietta's remarriage in August 1864, I would suggest Cyrus died between 25 Dec 1862 and 1 Sep 1863. Not much, I know, but it does provide a window of time, with which to search other records: newspaper obituaries, letters, diaries...

 

Continuing with the Draft Registration records, in vol. 2/4 on page 535 are recorded Frederick Willing, and his brother, Christian. In vol. 1/4 on page 85 is recorded John M. Ballard. Still in vol. 1/4 on page 82 is Cyrus' half-brother, Thomas H. Ballard.

 

I decided to track Thomas Ballard, to see how far I'd get: he became a Private in the 133rd OVI, a 100-day regiment, and was enlisted 6 May 1864, at Camp Chase, Ohio. His regiment was sent east, and saw service at Petersburg and the outskirts of Richmond, Virginia, before returning to Ohio. Thomas was mustered out on August 20th, 1864. Thomas survived the war (he was already married before he enlisted in the 133rd OVI) and he lived until 8 July 1910. He is buried in Oak Grove Cemetery, Georgesville, Franklin county, Ohio (Find-a-grave record # 18189383.)

 

His headstone resembles what I expect will eventually turn up for Cyrus. (I'm still looking for the cemeteries where Fountain, Elizabeth and Susannah Ballard are buried. And I wonder what Fountain Ballard thought about his second son being called up, having all ready lost Cyrus? I know, in my family, with three sons involved, and two of them dead by 1864, the effects were devastating. As I'm sure was the case in other families...)

 

All for now

 

Ozzy 

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Bruce

 

I had a bit of spare time, so thought I'd make use of the 'time window' discussed in my last post. Went on to 'Chronicling America,' a joint project of Library of Congress and Endowment for the Humanities: over 7 million pages of American newspapers, covering the period 1836-1922.  <chroniclingamerica.loc.gov>

 

On the Home Page, under 'Search pages' I scroll down to 'Ohio,' so I only get Ohio newspapers. I then select 'from 1862' and 'to 1863.' In the 'Search word' box, I place a single word (or 2-word phrase) that summarizes my search intent. Let's try 'Memphis Hospital.' Hit 'GO.'

 

I receive 31 results. Several are different dates of the Daily Ohio Statesman, which is good because it is a Columbus newspaper, and will contain local Franklin County news. I click on the Daily Ohio Statesman for September 4th, 1863. The image looks blurred, but you can zoom in, and it improves the clarity. The words 'hospital,' 'Memphis,' and 'Memphis Hospital' are highlighted for you, so you don't waste time searching the entire paper for the information you're after.

 

On page 3 of 4, in the first column, about halfway down, a report titled 'Deaths of Ohio Soldiers in Memphis Hospitals.' Unfortunately, Cyrus Ballard is not listed, but of the men who are, 'A. J. Braner of the 54th OVI, Co. E' is listed. I will check the Ohio Adjutant General's Directory (1888) to see how the information compares... In the meantime, just below that report, another one: 'Deaths of Ohio Soldiers at St Louis.' Again, no mention of Cyrus, but that's okay: I've eliminated this edition of the newspaper, as potentially containing useful information.

 

I go back to the 31 results, and try another newspaper... 

 

And, once I've finished checking 'Memphis Hospital,' I intend to try William Wallace, 54th Ohio, and 'smallpox' in separate searches.

 

Just thought I'd show you what is available at Chronicling America, and one of the ways I search.

 

Ozzy

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This is amazing Ozzy.  I received the information on the Form 86? (the $80 one) and received about 85 pages on DVD from NARA.  This is for Charles Butler, my GG.  It is primarily pension requests and some CW stuff.  I do know that he arrived in Petersburg sometime in the winter of 65 and was mustered out in late June.  He went to Appomattox CH and was in the Grand Review.  The 149 PVI on his head stone is also apparently wrong.  No records of him serving in that except his headstone.  Can't wait to get his other form and Cyrus'.

 

Bruce

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Bruce

 

Congratulations on receiving such a vast collection of NARA documents; appears they handled your request expeditiously, too. (And, yes, headstones are notorious for mispellings, omissions, and other errors.)

 

With my recent investigation, I decided to look more closely at Private A. J. Braner, 54th OVI, Co. E, to see where he was buried, and look at that cemetery as a possibility for the location of Cyrus Ballard's grave... But, there is no 'A. J. Braner' listed in Company E; nor any other companies, or staff, of the 54th Ohio. Either the name 'Braner' is a misspelling, (I checked Brawner, Brainer, Branard: no luck in the 54th OVI) or Private Braner was a member of some other infantry regiment, and not necessarily from Ohio, listed incorrectly by the newspaper reporter.

 

Because I was scrutinizing 54th OVI records anyway, I jotted down a few names of men who 'died in Hospital' in Tennessee,and Missouri, to see if I could track them to their final resting place (often members of the same regiment can be found in the same cemetery.) For the exercise:

  •      Corp. Felix Monroe        Co E     died Memphis   Dec 5, 1862
  •      Pvt. Samuel Glunt          Co B     died Memphis   Jul 6,  1863
  •      Pvt. Reuben Mitchell      Co E     died Jefferson Barracks  Apr 28, 1863
  •      Pvt. Thomas M. Cooper Co B     died St Louis    Jun 26, 1863   

With fifteen hospitals scattered around Memphis, you can be sure the dead were buried in the closest cemetery. But, after the war, a new cemetery was established, 'Mississippi River National Cemetery,' and all the Union dead from around Memphis (and many from Arkansas) were re-interred there. The name was changed to Memphis National Cemetery sometime later. Over 36,000 burials to date.

 

Corporal Felix Monroe: Find-a-grave record #17440974, listed as 'Felix Monroe, Corp, US Army' (no regiment or company details on headstone.)

 

Private Glunt: Find-a-grave #3156142, listed as 'S. Glunt July 6, 1863' (no regiment or company details on headstone.)

 

Of course, while searching Memphis National Cemetery, I looked for 'Ballard,' and all the misspellings, with no luck.

 

I then turned my attention to Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery,  with over 180,000 recorded burials (Arlington, Virginia has 400,000 burials.) Same story as Memphis: there was an effort to re-locate all Civil War burials from around St Louis, to this one facility.

 

Pvt Reuben Mitchell: Find-a-grave #81379956, listed as 'Ruben Mitchell  US Army  Civil War'

 

Pvt Cooper: Find-a-grave #106351025, listed as 'Thomas Cooper  54th OVI  Co B  died June 26th, 1863'  and an interesting story... It appears Thomas Cooper had smallpox. He was initially sent to Hospital in St Louis, but either died there, or on the 'Smallpox Island' to which he was sent. There were three 'Smallpox Islands' in use around St Louis: Pelican Island (used by Confederate POWs); Ellis Island (still to be officially confirmed, although records exist); and Arsenal Island (also called Quarantine Island). At least 470 Union soldiers succumbed to smallpox, and were buried in Arsenal Island Cemetery, their graves marked by wooden boards.

 

A flood on the Mississippi River in 1876 washed all the wooden boards away. When the cemetery was closed, and all the bodies re-interred at Jefferson Barracks, only eighty could be identified. (Private Cooper is one of those.) The rest are buried in individual graves, marked 'Unknown.'

 

Could Cyrus Ballard be in one of those? The records you get from NARA should help sort it out.

 

Ozzy

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Ozzy,

 

This is really interesting in that my son lives less than a mile from Jefferson Barracks National Cemetary.  I checked NARA today for my other requests and noticed that my other requests were still processing.  I'll let you know when I get it. 

 

Bruce

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Bruce

 

If your son could enquire 'Where the Arsenal Island Cemetery records ended up...' Every cemetery keeps records of burials. Even when the cemetery is closed, the records have to be filed somewhere. (The Administrator of Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery should have them, or know where they are.)

 

Speaking of cemetery records... Ran across something when I was doing a 'misspelled name check' for Cyrus Balard: Find-a-grave record #105223449 for Anderson Balard, in Thomas Adams Cemetery, of Grove City, Franklin county, Ohio. The reason I find it interesting:

  •      Thomas Adams Cemetery appears to be a childrens' cemetery: over half the burials are of children or infants
  •      A & S Ballard also have a child buried here: Margaret A. Ballard (1846-1851)
  •      'Anderson' is a name used at least twice before by the Ballard Family: not a common first name
  •      I can find only two other Balards in Ohio: both in Dayton
  •      Anderson Balard is recorded as 'One year, seven months old, passed away 1855, with parents C & H. E. Balard'

 

Is this a son of Cyrus and Henrietta Ballard?

 

Ozzy

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Very interesting find on the "Balards" in Dayton.  I'll look around a little more on that lead tonight.

 

I called Jefferson Barracks and asked about the 470 moved from Arsenal Island.  The person I talked to, Mike, was not aware that they were known but he knows a volunteer who has researched this.  He took my number and is going to call me back.

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Jim, this has been very interesting and frustrating.  Hopefully by November 8 the mystery of Cyrus Ballard will be solved, especially if he was at Shiloh.  Hopefully all the 54th Ohio did their job.

 

Bruce

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According to one family tree in Ancestry, Cyrus and Henriertta had three children, Anderson Ballard 1853-1855, Caroline Ballard 1855-1936, and Charles 1861-1947.  Two other sources said they only had Charles.

 

The 1860 census had Fountain living in Cyrus' birthplace of Scioto Twp, Pickaway County, Ohio.  SW section of the Columbus area.

 

Still working on this.

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Bruce

 

Speaking of Scioto Township, Pickaway County... I was trying to find Fountain Ballard's grave, and ran across his father's grave: William Ballard (1760-1841) in Press Peters Farm Cemetery. Find-a-grave record #127270745

 

In the same cemetery is Catherine Troxell Ballard (approx 1760- approx 1850). Find-a-grave record #127270717. (These records were only added in April 2014, so thought you might not have uncovered them yet.)

 

Also, an excellent map of Pickaway County, showing the location of every cemetery, by township: click on 'Scioto,' and 'Peters Farm (Press)' is location number 109

<maps.pchgl.org>

 

By the way... have you discovered anything worthwhile on the DVD?

 

Ozzy

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Jim

 

I've been looking at a few 16th Wisconsin records, while waiting for the three officer's names... Does Private Harrison C. Howard tie in with your story at all? (Died April 28th, 1862 at Hazel Green, of wounds sustained at Shiloh.) Find-a-grave #76438612

 

Ozzy

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Ozzy,

 

Not a ton on the DVD to my eyes, but I found out Charles Butler did serve twice, but the first time he had measles during a 6 month tour.  The second time, with Company C, 57th PVI, and was in Petersburg right before the breakthrough and stayed with the 57th through June and appears to be in the Grand Review.  I also know the names of his Captain and Lt.  Over the course of the war the unit did not see much action based on the causualty list.  No mention of the 149th PVI, the unit on his head stone.

 

Most of it was pension adjustments.  Curious to see what the form 86 turns up.

 

Thanks for the heads up on the Fountain's parents.  I just found the parents on a google search...

 

Bruce

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Ozzy,  The name Howard doesn't ring any bells, but over 40 men from Hazel Green were part of forming up Co. I, 16th WI and others joined throughout the war.

 

Jim

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Bruce

 

Just thought I'd bring you up to date on the two Sergeant Bennetts of the 54th OVI, and Private Charles Bennett of the 95th OVI.

 

SGT Charles K. Bennett (1833-1897) lived in Cincinnati before joining the 54th Ohio. No known immediate connection to the Bennetts of Pickaway or Franklin counties, therefore not a direct member of the family, (Buried Dayton National Cemetery, Find-a-grave record #354652

 

SGT Thomas C. Bennett (1840-1902) born in Camden, Preble, Ohio to Nelson and Margaret Musgrove Bennett. After service with the 54th Ohio, married Lizzy Chadwick in 1870 and moved to Kansas. Died on his farm near Delphos, Kansas and was buried in Delphos Cemetery, Find-a-grave #9907497. Tracked him to his grandfather, William Bennett. At best, a third cousin, and not a direct member of the family.

 

PVT Charles Bennett (1828-1873) was born in Pickaway County, and married Sarah (Geddes?) there about 1849. Had children John, Franklin, Mary and Lena before joining the 95th Ohio, Co. C in 1862. Wounded at Richmond, Kentucky, Discharged at completion of service, October 1864. Although I can find nothing concrete, the compelling coincidences are these:

  •      resided in Pickaway County, three houses away from Thornton and Susannah Ballard, at time of 1860 census
  •      moved to Jackson Township, Franklin County and lived near Cyrus and Henrietta Ballard
  •      In the Ohio Draft Registration, 1863, his name appears on page 36 of 725: the same page as Cyrus Ballard, four lines away

I believe Charles Bennett to be a brother, or nephew, of Elizabeth and Susannah Bennett. He is buried in Concord Cemetery, Grove City, Franklin, Ohio. Find-a-grave record #13265668

 

For the purpose of finding Cyrus Ballard's grave, the Bennett trail has reached a dead end. Will be concentrating on other records.

 

Ozzy

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Jim

 

I found Harrison Howard of interest because it appears he was sent home to Hazel Green, and subsequently died. Most likely, he took the train from Cairo (although I am not knowledgeable of train service north of Illinois in 1862); or he was transported on a steamboat, possibly to Galena. (Understanding how PVT Howard got home, helps me understand how John Oates got home.)

 

A few other men of the 16th Wisconsin...

 

PVT William C. Young,    Co. H     died of disease at St Louis on 16 May 1862. Buried Jefferson Barracks (Find-a-grave #81431673)

PVT John Solomon          Co. I      died of wounds at St Louis on 30 Apr 1862. Buried Jefferson Bks (Find-a-grave #81219967 as 'John Soloman')

PVT Edwin Bliss              Co. I      died of disease at St Louis on 16 Apr 1862. Buried Jefferson Bks (Find-a-grave #133822325) 

PVT George Burchill       Co. I      died of wounds at Keokuk on 12 May 1862.

CORP John C. Long        Co. I      died of wounds from Shiloh, at Keokuk on 15 Oct 1862. Keokuk Natl. Cemetery (Find-a-grave #68859907)

PVT Orville Hall               Co. I      died of disease at Davenport on 10 Jun 1862.

 

Are any of the patients at St Louis coincident with John Oates? They may have arrived there on the same paddle steamer.

 

Ozzy

 

 

 

 

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Bruce

 

Just happened upon a most amazing set of two documents (while researching information for my previous post to WI16thJim.) The obituaries for the entire State of Ohio, in brief abstract form, covering Dec 1861-31 Dec 1862 and 1 Jan 1863-20 June 1863. At sites hosted by USGenWeb Archives.

 

Disappointingly, I did not happen upon Cyrus Ballard during my first run through, but I will look more closely, next time.

 

Collected from the newspaper The Religious Telescope of Dayton, Ohio.

 

<files.usgwarchives.net/oh/newspapers/telescope/1862/ob-locale.txt>

 

<files.usgwarchives.net/oh/newspapers/telescope/1863/obits.txt>

 

Hope your eyesight is better than mine...

 

Ozzy

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