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Perry Cuskey

2015 Fall Hike Ideas

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Photography is all about light.  The best ambient light for taking images is at sunrise and sunset and I am pretty sure that's why Mike T (Grand Prize Winner of the CWPT Photography Contest) chose those times for his photo shoots.  Some photographers will tell you that mid-day light is just too harsh.  That doesn't mean we can not take photographs during that time, but they may not be of the quality required for serious juried competition. 

 

I have always been interest in artillery.  I wonder if we have any folks in the SDG who are also members of the North-South Skirmish Association (N-SSA).  It was organized in 1950 to promote the shooting of Civil War firearms and artillery.   Last I heard they had 4,000 members and 200 member teams.  Their home base is near Winchester, Virginia, but they have members as far away as Texas and California.  I've attended a number of their competitions and it is really something to see......especially target practice with the big guns.  Perhaps we couldn't have a 6-man team come fire a canon for us, but it would be nice to have someone from the N-SSA talk to us about the guns, as YEKCIM suggests.  Failing that, we can all watch the N-SSA videos on   http://www.n-ssa.org/index.php

 

 

THE MANASSAS BELLE

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The reason it is believed the eaglets have landed is that the eagles have been observed bringing in food. An alternate explanation may be that one eagle is bringing food to the other eagle sitting on the eggs. I've seen this on some eagle cams.

Jim

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yesterday i watched the change out and hiram began busily feeding --as fast as he was tearing off pieces and feeding it would seem there were 2 but might have been one very hungery eaglet.we will know in a few weeks when they get a little bigger and pop their heads up.

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Mike......

 

I volunteer for a group called "Find A Grave" and they have a remarkable database for those looking for burial sites for the famous and not so famous in this country and around the world.  Ideally, there is a brief bio, photo of the gravesite and photo of the deceased on the person's profile.  If the gravesite photo is not there, you can request a local volunteer to photograph one for you, if the grave is marked.  Since you are basically looking for civil war generals, there's a good chance you will find them on Find A Grave.  It is also a good resource for family history enthusiasts.  I've found information on that site for many of the 12,000+ members of my direct and collateral family tree lines.   http://www.findagrave.com

 

THE MANASSAS BELLE

 

One of my favorite websites! :-)

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One aspect of the battle that I have not sorted out is the location of the Union  regimental camps.  I have a pretty good idea of the location of the camps of Peabody and Miller of Prentiss's Division and Hildebrand and Stuart of Sherman's Division.  I've seen the camp markers on the north side of Cloud Field and at other locations, but, off the top of my head, can only guess as to which brigades they represent.

 

Certainly, I can go to the Battlefield America map (or other maps) to find the camp locations, but finding them on a map is different than actually visiting them.  Maybe a hike making the circuit of the Union regimental camps might be worthwhile.  I'm not sure that the topic is worthy of an Epic Hike but I thought it might spark some other ideas, especially since I heard some grousing last November that a future Epic Hike should cover a "Union" aspect.

 

On a related note, I did visit some of the Trabue brigade markers earlier this month and have scoped out a route for my not-so-epic hike on the Sunday following the Epic Hike.  We should be able to cover Trabue's actions on both days.

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Belle: "I know some public places frown on tripods as a matter of safety." If you'll notice, the dapper gent in your avatar is carrying a cleverly camouflaged tripod, which I've been using as a steadying balance for years:  

post-24-0-82156800-1431621203_thumb.jpg

 

Jim

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Ha ha ha, Jim!   You are way too funny!  Love your photo!  Are you sure you're not Irish and posed for that Boston Celtics avatar?  :)

 

I've used a hiking stick since my early days of civil war battlefield exploration.  The one I use now is made from a walnut tree harvested (legally) from the Cordori-Trostle Thicket of Gettysburg Battlefield.  Sure makes it easier fording streams and getting up and down ravines.  I suppose I could also use it as a monopod or tripod!!!  :D

 

THE MANASSAS BELLE

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Actually, Belle, I'm 1/2 Irish (my mother's parents were from Ireland) and 1/2 Cornish (Dad's parents from St. Claire, County Cornwall). 100% Celtic and only a second generation American. Three generations have served in the US military (Grandpa in the CW, my dad in the Army in the 1920's and me in the USAF in the 70's) , so we're assimilating. I will admit your avatar reminds me of an old drinking buddy.

 

Jim

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Jim,

 

I'm third generation American on Dad's side and second generation on Mom's.  My paternal 2nd great grandfather, from County Cork, Ireland, fought in Co. A, 56th Massachusetts Vols,, 1st Brigade, 1st Division, IX Corps and was wounded in Petersburg, VA during the civil war. My other foreign paternal 2nd great grandparents came from Nova Scotia, Canada.  My maternal grandparents came from County Louth, Ireland and Kilcardenshire, Scotland.  (Guess I'm what is known as a Heinz 57 variety!!!)  All generations mentioned above served in the U.S. military.  I didn't serve in the military but served as a U.S. Federal government civilian employee for several decades.

 

By the way......What do you know about the 8th Wisconsin?  I'm researching a interesting Maine native (lumberjack) who happened to be in Eau Claire, Wisconsin when the civil war began and enlisted with the 8th Wisconsin.

 

(Guess we should move all this to another place (maybe Campfire), since it really doesn't have anything to do with the 2015 Fall Shiloh hikes!)  :)

 

THE MANASSAS BELLE

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Belle: "I know some public places frown on tripods as a matter of safety." If you'll notice, the dapper gent in your avatar is carrying a cleverly camouflaged tripod, which I've been using as a steadying balance for years:  

attachicon.gifCane Tripod.JPG

 

Jim

Hmmm. Based on the shadows, the nature of the terrain, the length of the grass, and the type of bark on the trees, I would guess that this image was taken in Woolf Field, near Water Oaks Pond. The fact that the Tennessee monument is visible in the background is totally beside the point. :)

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Really like the history-of-the-park, artillery, and photography ideas.  I wonder if the themes of artillery and photography could be combined into one hike.  Something I learned from having hiked the Boy Scout artillery trails in years past is that there was a wide variety of artillery used at Shiloh, particularly on the Confederate side.  It might be interesting to discuss the different types, what types of rounds might be used in different situations, and so on, while visiting examples of the different rifled and smoothbore pieces and to visit those places where artillery was decisive (I'm thinking of Grant's Last Line and Ruggles Battery, primarily).  Battlefield photography very often includes a cannon or two, and an artillery-focused (pardon the pun) hike would be a good opportunity to improve our skills. 

I like this idea quite a bit. Thanks Ed.

Alan, I hadn't thought about something involving the Union camps, but it's an interesting idea. The main feature of the camps was the rather haphazard way they were arranged, as well as two totally inexperienced divisions being located along the outer perimeter. It's a pretty clear sign that they expected no trouble, and were far more focused on drill than staying on the alert.

This might be a good hike idea either this year or on a future gathering. It has some very definite possibilities. Thanks!

Perry

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