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lelliott19

Wood's Brigade - What Artillery Battalion?

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Thanks Ozzy. When I look at the thumbnails he certainly stands like the known of General Wood. 

 

The id of the General was from the original source of the picture Alabama Dept of Archive and History Digital Collection http://digital.archives.alabama.gov/cdm/singleitem/collection/photo/id/7538/rec/207  

 

I agree that it certainly would not be the first time a photo has been mislabeled. 

 

I see what you are saying about the body type and you are right about that. 

 

Ill try to post a comparison of the William Wood (known) and the 2 woods from the staff photo later today so we can take a look at them side by side. 

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Laura and Ozzy......

 

OK.  Let's approach this from another direction.  If you go by the placement of the buttons on a Brig. General's coat (16 buttons, 4 sets of 2), it appears the seated man on the right IS the General.

 

WOW, who would have thought a single photograph could cause so much research frenzy!!!   It's been lots of fun, though!  I've learned a lot!!!

 

The lesson to be learned.......Be sure to label your family photographs, identifying everyone in them!!!!  :)  I know my cousins and I still have difficulty distinguishing my grandfather from his male siblings in old photographs.

 

THE MANASSAS BELLE

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Laura

 

In lieu of other evidence, the line of four photographs, for me, do not disprove my feeling that the two on the left are of SAM Wood; the two on the right are of his older brother, William Basil Wood. But, perhaps I am talking myself into seeing similarities... (For William Wood, I see similarities in nose, mouth, ears, hair, shape of head, lack-of-neck, and stout build.)

 

Ozzy

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Belle and Laura

 

Briefly investigated Confederate Army Uniforms and Insignia, and discovered the following:

  • The CSA uniform was prescribed according to General Orders No.9, at City of Richmond, Virginia, dated June 6th, 1861;
  • The standard uniform was to be 'double-breasted, of cadet-gray colour'
  • Officers were to have 'markings on their lower sleeves, comprising one, two, three or four strands of braid, depending on status: more status, more braid;
  • Officers were to have collar insignia, with markings as prescribed: see attached link;

With the above in mind, Captain James Smith, 16th Alabama (see earlier post no.45) obviously has a single braid strand in his sleeve chevron; does the seated officer in Staff Officer Photo have three, or four braid strands, in his sleeve chevron?

 

What insignia does the dark-coated officer, seated, wear on his collar?

 

What insignia does the standing officer, center, wear on his collar?

 

Does the standing officer have any sleeve insignia/braids?

 

 

Just a few details to consider...

 

Ozzy

 

 

http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/world/csa/army-uniform.htm     (CSA Uniform regulations)

 

http://www.alibris.com/booksearch?browse=1&qwork=7418813&mtype=B     (Don Troiani's Uniforms of the Civil War)

 

http://www.acwtoysoldiers.com/Confederate%20Sets/CSA_CS_GenANV19pc.html     (Confederate General Officer action figures, illustrating various ideas of 'cadet-gray')

 

N.B.  The CSA Uniform Regulations also suggest black collars for Medical Department...

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Laura.....

 

One thing I've learned in my study of the civil war.......no one is an expert about everything!  We are constantly learning from one another.  The research is fun and helps us put together the pieces to our own jigsaw puzzles!

 

Ozzy........

 

Civil war uniforms are a study in themselves.  Colors, button placement, types of buttons, sleeve and collar adornments, braiding, hats, corps badges, etc. all lend themselves to make an individual stand out and be identifiable.   Then, again, there are those soldiers who did not make it easy for future generations to identify them in photographs by not adorning themselves with such things.  :)   And so it goes......

 

THE MANASSAS BELLE

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Belle

 

Too right... Differences 'from the norm' is why I included the display of toy soldiers in a previous post: model makers strive for historical accuracy; the colours shown in the various uniforms are true-to-life as possible.

 

 

Laura and Belle

 

Ran across the following link at Alabama Department of Archives and History: http://digital.archives.alabama.gov/cdm/singleitem/collection/photo/id/18184/rec/2

(Who does it look like: seated man, or standing man?)

 

Ozzy

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"Then, again, there are those soldiers who did not make it easy for future generations to identify them in photographs by not adorning themselves with such things. :) And so it goes......"

It can often be a challenge to find rank on Grant's uniform in his pictures.

Jim

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Here is an enlargement of the insignia/braid on the sleeves of the seated man. Looks to be at least four rows of braid. 

 

post-562-0-47419000-1427670583_thumb.png

 

Heres a comparison of the "middle man" along with the known of SAM Wood in later years. (Old SAM sure is a lot better looking in his older age than his brother William.) 

 

post-562-0-23665000-1427671235_thumb.png

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Just received the scanned image below from my cousin. We had speculated about a friendship between the Wood brothers and Dr Cross prior to their service. I believe this verifies that indeed a relationship existed. 

 

The letter is from William Basil Wood who was at the time, Colonel of the 16th AL Infantry. (I have no idea why it says 15th unless perhaps the designation was changed after Sept 21 1861?) It is addressed to my gggrandfather Dr. Wm C Cross who would indeed answer in the affirmative and become the Surgeon of the 16th AL and later Brigade Surgeon for Wood's Brigade. Unfortunately, I only have a scanned copy. The original letter was donated to the Alabama Department of Archives and History many years ago.

 

Head Quarters 15 Regt Ala Vols
Knoxville Sept 21, 1861

Dr. Wm C Cross
Dear Sir.

Some of our regiment are very anxious to have you for surgeon of the regiment. And I need not say that there is no man living that I would prefer to you. If you will accept of it I will have you appointed.

I am aware that it is a hard berth. And for a man who loves home and its endearment as well as you; and who has so large a family it will be a considerable sacrifice. But if you can leave your business & family, it will be a great pleasure to us to have you. I leave it however for your determination, if you can consistently go with us, I know you will do it.

Please write to me at Florence 
(Wood's home town Florence, AL) I will be there next Sunday and let me know if you can accept. Give my best regards to your family and believe me 
Very Truly
Yr frd &c
W. B. Wood

Col+Wood+to+Dr+Cross.pdf

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Laura

 

Congratulations on an impressive discovery!

 

Doesn't matter who holds the original: copies these days are nearly as good (and it is best to have copies spread among family members, in case of fire or flood.)

 

 

Ozzy

 

N.B.  Nothing new to add on the Staff Officer Photo. The number of braids in the seated officer's chevron is inconclusive. Will require another photo or two, to positively determine identities of two members [i am confident we know the identities of three of them.]

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Greetings to everyone who previously weighed in on this one and to those who havent yet seen it. I know its been a while, but I think I finally ID'd the standing man in the middle of this image ID'd as "Sterling Alexander Martin (SAM) Wood and staff"

BrigGen_SAM Wood and staff 1.jpg

So just to catch up everyone who hasnt seen this before, all but one of the men has been ID'd - some more certain than others. The one remaining unidentified was the middle man standing. 

Seated L-R
1) Brig Genl Sterling Alexander Martin Wood 
2) Henry Clay Wood, Aide-de-camp (and brother of BG SAM Wood)
Standing L-R
1) Martin Vanburen Walt AQM (? I'm still not 100% sure on this one. On Apr 24, 1863, Walt was promoted to QM with a rank of Maj, to rank Oct 14, 1862)
2) middle man - unknown
3) Dr William Cordwell Cross, Brigade Surgeon (my 2xg grandfather)

So here's the NEW information. 
That middle standing man, the unknown one? I think this is him:
Rev Alexander Lockett Hamilton.JPG 
Left image cropped from original; right image cropped from http://vault.georgiaarchives.org/cdm/ref/collection/vg2/id/13469 

Rev. Alexander Lockett Hamilton, originally enlisted as Chaplain of the 16th Alabama Infantry.
He was one staff officer I had not previously searched for. I only started looking because I found a notation that he had served as the Quartermaster and "had kept a diary of the movement of the Sixteenth." From "Early Settlers of Alabama, Part 1," James Edmonds Saunders and ‎Elizabeth Saunders Blair Stubbs, published 1899, p. 176, I also learned that Hamilton had served as "president of a female academy at Cuthbert, Georgia" and so was able to locate the 1875 (?) image herehttp://vault.georgiaarchives.org/cdm/ref/collection/vg2/id/13469 entitled "Cuthbert, 1875. Students at Andrew College pose for a photograph with the president of the college, Doctor A.L. Hamilton. The college was founded in 1854 as Andrew Female College."

Born Sep. 13, 1827 Rockbridge County VA
Graduated Washington University (now Washington and Lee University) in 1845 or 46.
Enlisted as the chaplain of the 16th Alabama, supposedly acted as aide to Brig Gen Sterling Alexander Martin (S.A.M.) Wood, and was made the Quartermaster with a rank of Major.
Died March 7, 1881 while serving as the President of Andrew Female College (Cuthbert, GA) 1866-1871 and 1887-1881.
 

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Laura

Greetings... and thanks for the update on your quest to put names to faces in that 16th Alabama photograph. I've had a look at the A.L. Hamilton photograph, and although I admit it is "close-ish" (and would not discard the possibility, pending further information) my own "estimation" of the gentlemen assembled for that photographic image (as presented, above post):

  • William Basil Wood (seated in dark uniform, 3 braids in sleeve chevron denoting Colonel)
  • Henry Clay Wood (seated beside his brother; collar seems to indicate Captain)
  • man with triangular face and broad forehead, standing at left is most likely Martin Walt or Linus A. McClung (the drawing used as reference for Walt is not perfect match; never yet seen another image of McClung to prove/disprove; collar same as Henry Clay Wood)
  • man standing in center is Colonel SAM Wood (based on two later images used for comparison; and hand on shoulder of his brother, William)
  • older man with dark collar and cuffs (Medical Corps) is Dr. William C. Cross.

I will also go out on a limb and suggest this CDV was taken at Knoxville, Tennessee in November 1861.

Cheers

Ozzy

 

References:  62 posts in this topic

http://digital.archives.alabama.gov/cdm/singleitem/collection/photo/id/18184/rec/2   post-war image of SAM Wood

http://www.civilwarhome.com/16alainf.html   16th Alabama movements: see Knoxville reference.

 

N.B.  Just want to acknowledge Manassas Belle as the first one to provide a post-war photo of William Basil Wood (which so closely resembles the seated officer in dark uniform); and first to suggest (in post of 28 March 2015) SAM Wood may be the officer standing in center, to rear. Post-war photos of SAM Wood do not closely resemble the seated officer; however, if SAM Wood is indeed  one of the five men in the Civil War CDV, he can only be the center man in rear of the group.  - Ozzy

 

 

 

 

Edited by Ozzy
Correct the record...
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I ran across this group in looking for information about my family history. I am a descendent of Captain Linus Anderson Mcclung. He died from wounds from Perryville days after being injured. He also had two brothers that served. Col Francis Barclay Mcclung and William Mcclung. They both survivedthe war. Do you know of any pictures of them? They were my grandfather's great uncles. Francis is buried in the Reynolds Cemetery in Glen Wilton, Va. Will died in San Francisco defending Lillian Coit from a attacker. His wife and her were friends. I am vert interested in anything about them and their service. 

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Katherine

Welcome! Wishing you every success in finding the information you seek.

This particular topic was an attempt to identify five Confederate officers in a photograph, possibly taken at Knoxville Tennessee about November 1861. Linus A. McClung may be one of the officers in the image, but that remains merely conjecture. As far as I know, none of us have uncovered a certified image of Linus McClung (or any other member of the McClung family, circa 1860, to use as comparison.)

All I am able to provide is the following link, to The McClung Genealogy: 

http://archive.org/stream/mcclunggenealog00mcclgoog#page/n143/mode/2up/search/Linus  McClung Genealogy at archive.org

All the best

Ozzy

 

 

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