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Ozzy

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While helping a friend on another website search for information about their ancestor (and Shiloh veteran), I ran across the following online site, run by the State of Illinois. It lists 'descriptive features' (age, height, hair color, eye color, occupation, etc) of all the Civil War soldiers enlisted in Illinois. Start by pressing [search]. In new window, in the 'Search Box,' place the soldier's name as such [Gregg, Patrick]  or  [Grant, U ] with 'comma' and 'space' separating last name from first name... and ignore boxes for 'Company' and 'Unit'  as the search works fine without those entries.

 

For those with ancestors from Illinois regiments...

 

Cheers

 

Ozzy

 

 

http://www.cyberdriveillinois.com/departments/archives/databases/datcivil.html     (Illinois Civil War soldiers)

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Again for Illinois...

 

In conjunction with the 'cyberdrive' website finding aid, mentioned above, is the one below, provided by <illinoisgenweb.org>  Every one of the eight volumes produced by the Illinois Adjutant General, after the Civil War, has been re-entered in an easy-to-read format, and can be searched by Regiment; or County of Organization. General Officers from the state are listed (of interest, when reviewing the promotion to Brigadier General of U.S. Grant, Stephen Hurlbut, John McClernand and Benjamin Prentiss: all four promotions date from 17 May 1861.)

 

A valuable tool for Illinois ancestor researchers, with links to Dyer's Compendium. Available at: http://civilwar.illinoisgenweb.org/index.html

 

 

Ozzy

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This time, for Iowa:

 

This State has benefited from years of research and comprehensive record-keeping. A primary online tool for investigating the contributions of Civil War ancestors is: http://www.iagenweb.org/     (Home page of Iowa genealogical research).  To access ancestor data, click on [special Projects], and in the new window, click on [iowa in the Civil War].  In the new window are three possible paths of interest:

  1. Union Regimental Histories: a link to Dyer's Compendium
  2. Roster and Record of Iowa Troops in the Rebellion, Vols. 1-6
  3. Remain on 'Iowa in the Civil War: Regiments' page, and scroll down for information (and access to County records).

Item #2 provides comprehensive roster information (by regiment); exhaustive regimental histories (compiled by Guy Logan); Army correspondence...

 

Still in Item #2, below 'Letters to Headquarters,' continue to scroll down to the Regiment of interest: Infantry, Cavalry or Artillery. Towards the bottom, "Iowa men who served in military organizations of other States"  is the final offering.

 

Item #3 offers access to diaries, letters and newspaper articles.

 

Cheers

 

Ozzy

 

 

To go directly to Guy Logan's Historical Sketches, click this link: http://iagenweb.org/civilwar/books/logan.htm     (Iowa Civil War Soldiers)

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Indiana... The complete works of the Indiana Adjutant General have been scanned onto the Internet: http://archive.org/details/reportindiana04dougrich   (Vol.4  Begin 6th Indiana Inf Regt)

 

http://archive.org/stream/reportofadjutant02indi#page/n5/mode/2up    (Vol.2  Officers)

 

http://archive.org/details/reportofadjutant03indi     (Vol.3  Officers and Regt histories, begin 75th Indiana Inf)

 

http://archive.org/stream/indianainwarofre7122indi#page/n5/mode/2up   (Vol.1  Overall history of Indiana involvement)

 

http://archive.org/stream/reportindiana05dougrich#page/n5/mode/2up   (Vol.5  Begin 30th Indiana Inf Regt)

 

http://archive.org/stream/reportindiana06dougrich#page/n3/mode/2up   (Vol.6  Begin 60th Indiana Inf Regt)

 

http://archive.org/stream/reportofadjutant07indi#page/n5/mode/2up   (Vol.7  Begin 111th Indiana, includes Cav and Artillery)

 

http://archive.org/stream/reportindiana08dougrich#page/n5/mode/2up   (Vol.8  Supplemental, mostly Regt details corrections)

 

 

Ozzy

 

 

N.B.  Pardon the lack of sequence... Entered as I found them.

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Agreed... Wisconsin has done an outstanding job, providing online access to Civil War materials. And the museums are excellent.

 

Thanks for posting, Jim.

 

Ozzy

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Michigan: at first glance, does not appear to have contributed much to the Battle of Shiloh, and yet...

  • everyone knows about the 15th Michigan: arrived morning of 6th April, and sent to the front without ammunition;
  • the 12th Michigan was at the front, with Prentiss, and got caught up in 'those patrols,' and early contact with the enemy;
  • Colonel Francis Quinn, 12th Michigan, wrote the Shiloh 'After-action report,' on behalf of the 6th Division (in Prentiss' absence);
  • and there is the little-known, but important story of Lieutenant William Bliss, of Ross' Battery (1st Michigan Lt Artillery) -- while in captivity.

The full record, all 46 volumes, of the Michigan Adjutant General's Civil War Report has been made available online by HathiTrust. Although consisting of so many volumes, there is logic to the arrangement: Volumes 2-30 directly represent the Infantry Regiment bearing that number, i.e., Vol. 12 is where you find the 12th Michigan; Vol. 15 is where you find the 15th Michigan. Cavalry regiments run Volumes 31-40, and artillery from Volume 41-43. (The 1st Michigan Light Artillery Regiment is to be found in Vol. 42.)

 

Go to this link, scroll down, and follow the cues:  http://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/003931700     (Michigan Civil War Soldiers)

 

 

Ozzy

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Michigan: at first glance, does not appear to have contributed much to the Battle of Shiloh, and yet...

  • everyone knows about the 15th Michigan: arrived morning of 6th April, and sent to the front without ammunition;
  • the 12th Michigan was at the front, with Prentiss, and got caught up in 'those patrols,' and early contact with the enemy;
  • Colonel Francis Quinn, 12th Michigan, wrote the Shiloh 'After-action report,' on behalf of the 6th Division (in Prentiss' absence);
  • and there is the little-known, but important story of Lieutenant William Bliss, of Ross' Battery (1st Michigan Lt Artillery) -- while in captivity.

The full record, all 46 volumes, of the Michigan Adjutant General's Civil War Report has been made available online by HathiTrust. Although consisting of so many volumes, there is logic to the arrangement: Volumes 2-30 directly represent the Infantry Regiment bearing that number, i.e., Vol. 12 is where you find the 12th Michigan; Vol. 15 is where you find the 15th Michigan. Cavalry regiments run Volumes 31-40, and artillery from Volume 41-43. (The 1st Michigan Light Artillery Regiment is to be found in Vol. 42.)

 

Go to this link, scroll down, and follow the cues:  http://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/003931700     (Michigan Civil War Soldiers)

 

 

Ozzy

 

Always pride for my fellow Michiganders! I still to this day believe the majority of the Michigan soldiers flew under the radar, due to having to cover for any and all those Ohio regimental soldiers turning and running towards Pittsburg Landing...but that's just me ;)

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Paul

 

Hope you found the Michigan resources of use. Feel free to add anything you've run across...

 

Regards

 

Ozzy

 

 

Minnesota  had a very valuable artillery regiment at Shiloh, that accompanied the 12th Iowa to Pittsburg Landing... was assigned to Sherman... then re-assigned to Prentiss on April 4th. They shifted their campsite on April 5th, and were preparing for inspection in the wee hours of the morning of Sunday, April 6th:  Munch's 1st Battery of Light Artillery.  http://archive.org/details/minnesotacivil01minnrich

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Missouri... takes a bit of searching, but most of the Shiloh-involved units are available online.

 

First, there are two State-run sites that offer massive amounts of information (just no rosters.) However, newspapers and diaries and letters are available; well worth a browse:  http://shs.umsystem.edu/research/guides/civilwar/index.html     (State Historical Society of Missouri)

http://www.sos.mo.gov/mdh/CivilWar/Resources.asp#coll     (Missouri Digital Heritage -- Civil War)

 

All of the Missouri units have regimental histories and rosters available at the NPS site:  http://www.nps.gov/civilwar/search-battle-units.htm

 

EXCEPT... Birge's Western Sharpshooters aka 14th Missouri Infantry. NPS Soldiers and Sailors must be searched, via 66th Illinois Infantry Regiment.

 

Jessie Scouts...  Not listed at NPS (although 2nd Rhode Island Infantry may contain some members, such as Major Henry H. Young.)  I have uncovered names of individuals via OR reports. Captain Charles C. Carpenter provided information to MGen Lew Wallace at Crump's Landing (as did three other Jessie Scouts.) Carpenter was caught up in the Halleck/Grant Purge (wrongful possession of a horse.) A book, published 2014, is available... but I do not have a copy. No idea how many of the sixty Jessie Scouts are mentioned.  Civil War Special Forces: the Elite and Distinct Fighting Units of the Union, by Robert P. Broadwater (2014). And http://www.jessiescouts.com/Jessie%20Scouts%20Home.html    (Another book on the Jesse Scouts.)

 

Artillery at Shiloh:  Mann's Independent Battery of Light Artillery; and 1st Missouri Light Artillery, Battery D, K and L.  All have rosters and unit histories via NPS Soldier and Sailors site:  http://www.nps.gov/civilwar/soldiers-and-sailors-database.htm

 

Infantry at Shiloh:

 

Only Federal forces from Missouri listed here.

 

 

Ozzy

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Nebraska contributed to the Army of the Tennessee:  Colonel John Thayer's 1st Nebraska Infantry was engaged at Fort Donelson, and again at Shiloh. There are several good research sites available, online:

 

Ozzy

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Ohio has arguably the best-looking websites on the Internet, at Ohio GenWeb   http://www.ohgenweb.org/

and Ohio History Connection  http://www.ohiohistory.org   [scroll down to 'Civil War']

 

 

Many counties have put together impressive collections, via Ohio Genealogy Express:  http://www.ohiogenealogyexpress.com/military/prebleco_chaptXIV_war_rebellion_54thOI.htm   (Records shown are for for Preble County. Most other Ohio counties available.)

 

 

The Adjutant General Civil War records of all Ohio Regiments (including detailed rosters) are available online here:  http://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/000454243    (Provided free by HathiTrust)

 

 

And at Chronicling America, free access is provided to select Ohio newspapers, such as 'Urbana Union'   http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/   [uS Newspaper directory 1690-present, under 'U' go to page 24, and click on Urbana Union 1862-1872. Use 'Calendar tool' to select particular newspaper date.]

 

 

Ozzy

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Pennsylvania contributed one regiment to the Battle of Shiloh: the 77th Volunteer Infantry. For the research of family history information, the best place to begin is The Guide to Civil War Holdings: Pennsylvania State Archives. Although nothing links directly online, this reference provides a complete listing of all documents held by the State of Pennsylvania:  http://pacivilwar150.com/ResourcesFor/cmp-media/inthenews/guide_to_civil_war_records.pdf

 

There are two main online listings of Civil War soldiers from Pennsylvania: the holdings at pa-roots.com  http://www.pa-roots.com/pacw/infantry/paregimentsnew3.html  (click the link, and follow the cues);

and the Veteran's Card File (listing compiled by Samuel Bates in 1871 on 3 x 5 cards, copied for internet access. All soldiers listed alphabetically, by last name.)  http://www.pacivilwar.com/cardfile.html

 

The history of the 77th Pennsylvania can be found at pa-roots.com and here:  https://archive.org/details/seventyseventhpe03penn  (The 77th at Shiloh, available at archives.com).

 

And there is the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission, with its listings of additional resources:  http://www.portal.state.pa.us/portal/server.pt/community/militia_resource_guide/21498/militia_resource_guide_1815-1870/1609676

 

All of the above make Pennsylvania one of the easiest State record collections to search.

 

 

Cheers

 

Ozzy

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Ozzy.......

 

I can't say enough about Samuel P. Bates', History of Pennsylvania Volunteers 1861-5.  It's a great resource.  I've used it many times in my research projects on Gettysburg.

 

THE MANASSAS BELLE

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Belle

 

Pennsylvania State Archives also maintain an impressive collection of Revolutionary War documents. (Like the Civil War, many participants served in a State organization, as opposed to a National one. And when the National records all burned up in Washington D.C. during the War of 1812, the State records survived.)

 

The only real difficulty when searching Pennsylvania Archives, is when faced with the need to determine the County your ancestor was from: the boundaries have changed unceasingly, and without resorting to logic. Scroll down to the 'Interactive Map,' and hit <Play> to see what I mean:  http://www.mapofus.org/pennsylvania/

 

 

Regards

 

Ozzy

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I'm glad to see all of these listings for the northern states involved in the Battle of Shiloh.  They reflect much work involved to find and read them.  But I have a problem in understanding who they fought.  There is no other army mentioned at all.  Does that mean there was no opponent?

Ron  

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For those interested in "what Civil War records are held at the National Archives?" the Guide to Civil War Records (1962) provides over 600 pages of detail. Some records (such as individual soldier CMSR -- combined military service records) are readily available (for a fee, ranging from $35 - $100). Others are only accessible by patrons and researchers fronting up to the National Archives at Washington D.C. Recommend begin pages 250 - 266 and expand enquiries from that explanatory segment.

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=z8XhAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA490&lpg=PA490&dq=naval+historical+center+william+w.+McKean&source=bl&ots=famnoNNACR&sig=ACfU3U3sQ0wmtWOcWmHdqD8ISZe2fmmKLA&hl=en&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwiC0cuWmp3mAhVo6nMBHZruCtsQ6AEwBnoECAcQAQ#v=onepage&q=fishing&f=false  

 

 

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