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legislation that would expand the boundary of Shiloh National Military Park to include three Civil War b

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I would like to keep the Shiloh National Battlefield Park as the Shiloh National battlefield park.  I believe that including these three small battles within the present park and its responsibilities would place too much work on the limited staff and resources.  the attentions of the staff and management would be deluded and spread thin.  I question how can they do this?  Further, the goal of improving these three small sites can be accomplished in an other manner.  An example would be to create a new separate management unit for these three sites.  My thoughts so chop away.

Ron 

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Without reading the entire bill, I cannot comment intelligently on its merits or problems.  Do you have a reference on-line where the bill is posted?

 

THE MANASSAS BELLE

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Here is the answer to my own question above:

 

 

H.R. 87 -- Shiloh National Military Park Boundary Adjustment and Parker's Crossroads Battlefield Designation Act (Introduced in House - IH)

114th Congress, 1st Session

 

To modify the boundary of the Shiloh National Military Park located in Tennessee and Mississippi, to establish Parker's Crossroads Battlefield as an affiliated area of the National Park System, and for other purposes.

 

IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

January 6, 2015

 

Mrs. BLACKBURN introduced the following bill; which was referred to the Committee on Natural Resources

 

A BILL

 

To modify the boundary of the Shiloh National Military Park located in Tennessee and Mississippi, to establish Parker's Crossroads Battlefield as an affiliated area of the National Park System, and for other purposes.

 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,

 

SECTION 1.  SHORT TITLE.

 

This Act may be cited as the 'Shiloh National Military Park Boundary Adjustment and Parker's Crossroads Battlefield Designation Act'.

 

SEC. 2.  DEFINITIONS

 

In this Act, the following definitions apply:

 

   (1)  AFFILIATED AREA - The term 'affiliated area' means the Parker's Crossroads Battlefield established as an affiliated area of the National Park System under section 4.

 

   (2)  PARK - The term 'Park' means Shiloh National Military Park, a unit of the National Park System.

 

   (3)  SECRETARY - The term 'Secretary' means the Secretary of the Interior.

 

SEC. 3.  AREAS TO BE ADDED TO SHILOH NATIONAL MILITARY PARK.

 

   (a)  Additional Areas - The boundary of Shiloh National Military Park is modified to include the area that are generally depicted on the map entitled 'Shiloh National Military Park, Proposed Boundary Adjustment', numbered 304/80,011, and dated April 2012 as follows:

 

         (1)  Fallen Timbers Battlefield.

 

         (2)  Russell House Battlefield.

 

         (3)  Davis Bridge Battlefield.

 

  ( b )  Acquisition Authority - The Secretary may acquire lands described in subsection (a) by donation, purchase from willing sellers with donated or appropriated funds, or exchange.

 

  ( c )  Administration - Any lands acquired under this section shall be administered as part of the Park.

 

SEC. 4.  ESTABLISHMENT OF AFFILIATED AREA.

 

  (a)  In General - Parker's Crossroads Battlefield in the State of Tennessee is hereby established as an affiliated area of the National Park System.

 

  ( b )  Description - The affiliated area shall consist of the area generally depicted within the 'Proposed Boundary' on the map entitled 'Parker's Crossroads Battlefield, Proposed Boundary', numbered 903/80,073, dated April 2012.

 

  ©  Administration - The affiliated area shall be managed in accordance with this Act and all laws generally applicable to units of the National Park System.

 

  (d)  Management Entity - The City of Parkers Crossroads and the Tennessee Historical Commission shall jointly be the management entity for the affiliated area.

 

  (e)  Cooperative Agreements - The Secretary may provide technical assistance and enter into cooperative agreements with the management entity for the purpose of providing financial assistance with marketing, marking, interpretation, and preservation of the affiliated area.

 

  (f)  Limited Role of the Secretary - Nothing in this Act authorizes the Secretary to acquire property at the affiliated area or to assume overall financial responsibility for the operation, maintenance, or management of the affiliated area.

 

  (g)  General Management Plan -

 

         (1)  IN GENERAL - The Secretary, in consultation with the management entity, shall develop a general management plan for the affiliated area.  The plan shall be prepared in accordance with section 12( b ) of Public Law 91-383 (16 U.S. C. 1a-1 et seq.; commonly known as the National Park System General Authorities Act).

 

         (2)  TRANSMITTAL - Not later than 3 years after the date that funds are made available for this Act, the Secretary shall provide a copy of the completed general management to the Committee on Natural Resources of the House of Representatives and the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources of the Senate.

 

 

 

Note:  I have not yet located copies of the maps mentioned in the above Bill.  The above Bill was introduced  in the Senate on August 5, 2015 as S.1943.

 

THE MANASSAS BELLE 

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What is the significance of the Russell House?

 

The Wikipedia (from whence all knowledge flows) doesn't mention it, and a Google search came up empty.

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I don't see how the addition of the Corinth Interpretive Center has diminished the mission at Shiloh, so I would question if further new units would do so. Of course, it would most likely have to include an expanded budget, which would be the rub.

Jim

PS I took the liberty of removing the other two posts.

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Transylvania and other SDG Members

 

I found the following, which might explain it more thoroughly than the Bill up above:

 

STATEMENT OF CHRISTINA GOLDFUSS, DEPUTY DIRECTOR, CONGRESSIONAL AND EXTERNAL RELATIONS, NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, BEFORE THE SENATE SUBCOMMITTEE ON NATIONAL PARKS, COMMITTEE ON ENERGY AND NATURAL RESOURCES, CONCERNING S.1785 (113TH CONGRESS) TO MODIFY THE BOUNDARY OF SHILOH NATIONAL MILITARY PARK LOCATED IN THE STATES OF TENNESSEE AND MISSISSIPPI, TO ESTABLISH PARKER'S CROSSROADS BATTLEFIELD AS AN AFFILIATED AREA OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM, AND FOR OTHER PURPOSES

 

JULY 23, 2014

_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

Mr. Chairman and members of the Subcommittee, thank you for the opportunity to present the views of the Department of the Interior on S. 1785, a bill to modify the boundary of Shiloh National Military Park in the States of Tennessee and Mississippi, to establish Parker's Crossroads Battlefield in the state of Tennessee as an affiliated area of the National Park System, and for other purposes.

 

The Department supports S.1785.

 

S. 1785 would add three sites related to the Siege and Battle of Corinth to the boundary of Shiloh National Military Park.  In 1991, the "Siege and Battle of Corinth Sites" was designated a National Historic Landmark.  The Corinth Battlefield Protection Act of 2000 (Public Law 106-271) authorized the creation of the Corinth Unit, as part of Shiloh National Military Park, to "interpret the Siege and Battle of Corinth and other Civil War actions in the area in and around the city of Corinth, Mississippi."  The legislation defined a large partnership role with state, local, and private park partners in the planning, development and interpretation of the unit.  The law also authorized a special resource study to identify and determine any other areas that would be appropriate for inclusion in the unit.

 

The "Corinth Special Resource Study and Boundary Adjustment Environmental Assessment," completed in 2004, identified 18 sites that have a high degree of integrity and significant resources that would provide opportunities for public enjoyment, and recommended that these be included in the boundary of the Corinth Unit of Shiloh National Military Park.  In 2007, Congress amended the Corinth Battlefield Protection Act of 2000 (Public Law 110-161, Section 127) to expand the boundary of the Corinth Unit of Shiloh National Military Park to include 12 of those sites.

 

S. 1785 would further modify the boundary of Shiloh National Military Park to include three of the six remaining sites identified in the 2004 special resource study.  These three sites--the battlefields of Fallen Timbers, Russell House, and Davis Bridge--would contribute significantly to telling the remarkable story of the Union Army's Mississippi Valley Campaign during the Civil War, especially the Battle of Shiloh, Tennessee and the Siege of Corinth, Mississippi.  The Mississippi Valley Campaign was a major milestone on the road that led to the final success of the Union Army in the war and the ultimate reunification of the nation.

 

The first battlefield that S.1785 would include in Shiloh's authorized boundary is Fallen Timbers.  On April 8, 1862, after two days of fierce fighting at Shiloh, Major General Ulysses S. Grant dispatched Brigadier General William T. Sherman on a reconnaissance to investigate Confederate intentions.  Sherman encountered a large Confederate field hospital protected by a force of Southern cavalry under Lieutenant Colonel Nathan Bedford Forrest in an area called Fallen Timbers.  Sherman advanced against the Confederate force and captured the field hospital with its surgeons and about 250 wounded Southern soldiers and about 50 wounded Union soldiers that had been previously captured by the Confederates.  After this engagement, the Confederates retreated to Corinth and Sherman returned to Shiloh Church.  Thus, the final shots of the Battle of Shiloh were fired at Fallen Timbers.  A cautious and methodical Union advance would now mark the beginning of the advance upon, and siege of Corinth.

 

The Fallen Timbers Battlefield site consists of 468 acres of agricultural and forested land, a small portion of which is developed.  The Civil War Trust has acquired approximately 270 acres of this land with the intention of donating it to the federal government.  The remaining 198 acres that would be included in the boundary are in private ownership.

 

The second battlefield that S. 1785 would include in Shiloh's authorized boundary is the Russell House.  On May 17, 1862, during the advance upon Corinth, Union Forces led by Major General Sherman, fought a Confederate brigade and compelled the southern force to abandon its strong outpost at the Russell House situated on the Tennessee-Mississippi state line.  Because the position possessed a great natural strength, Sherman's men lost no time fortifying it and driving the enemy further south toward Corinth.

 

The pastoral setting of the Russell House Battlefield retains a high degree of integrity, contains the extant remains of field fortifications, and has high potential for archeological survey and research.  The approximately 666-acre tract that would be included in the boundary is in private ownership.

 

The third battlefield that S. 1785 would include in Shiloh's authorized boundary is Davis Bridge.  On October 5, 1862, Union troops attacked a retreating Confederate force at Davis Bridge on the Hatchie River.  The Federals drove the Confederates back across the river, seized the bridge, and charged into a thicket east of the river.  Confederates defending the heights overlooking the crossing to the east inflicted heavy casualties on the Federals and checked their further advance, thereby permitting the defeated Confederate force to retreat south into Mississippi.  The engagement at Davis Bridge was the last Confederate offensive in Mississippi.

 

In 1998, a 598-acre portion of the Davis Bridge Battlefield was listed in the National Register of Historic Places.  The bridge across the Hatchie River has long since washed away and the banks of the river have undergone erosion, but the 1,090 acres proposed to be included in the park boundary retain a high degree of integrity with much of the acreage remaining agricultural cultivation or woodlands.  The State of Tennessee owns approximately 845 of these acres.  An approximately five-acre plot, which is a contributing property to the Siege and Battle of Corinth National Historic Landmark, has been donated to the National Park Service by the Davis Bridge Memorial Foundation.

 

If this legislation is enacted, we anticipate that we would acquire the majority of land by donation and that we would not develop visitor services or facilities at the three sites for the foreseeable future.  Therefore, land acquisition and development costs would be minimal.  Our current estimate for administrative costs associated with land donation at the three sites is $60,000 to cover title searches, environmental site assessments, and closing actions.

 

S. 1785 would also establish Parker's Crossroads Battlefield in the State of Tennessee as an affiliated area of the National Park System.  The bill designates the city of Parkers Crossroads and the Tennessee Historical Commission as the management entity for the affiliated area and authorizes the Secretary of the Interior to provide technical assistance and enter into cooperative agreements with the management entity for the purpose of providing financial assistance for the marketing, marking, interpretation, and preservation of the affiliated area.  As an affiliated area, Parker's Crossroads Battlefield would continue under non-federal ownership and management, but the owner would be required to administer the site consistent with laws applicable to units of the National Park System.

 

Affiliated areas comprise a variety of locations in the United States that preserve significant properties outside of the National Park System.  Some of these have been designated by Acts of Congress and others have been designated administratively.  All draw on technical assistance or financial aid from the National Park Service.

 

The Parker's Crossroads Battlefield is listed in the National Register of Historic Places and is significant for its role in the military history of the Civil War and its archeological potential to yield information concerning the battle.  The Parker's Crossroads Battlefield was the final engagement of Confederate now-Brigadier General Nathan Bedford Forrest's West Tennessee raid of December 1862 which resulted in the disruption of Major General Ulysses S. Grant's supply lines as his army advanced towards Vicksburg.  Forrest's raid and the simultaneous destruction of Grant's supply depot at Holly Spring, Mississippi, caused Grant to end his overland campaign against Vicksburg.

 

Since the battle, the area has remained largely in agricultural fields and forests consistent with its appearance in 1862, and the site retains a high degree of integrity.  It is likely that the site contains physical remnants of the battle which can provide information concerning troop movements and areas where primary fighting occurred.  The site is known to contain the remains of soldiers who were killed during the fighting and other burials may have also occurred there.

 

We recommend amending both of the map references in S. 1785 to allow for more current maps to be substituted.  We would be happy to provide the committee with recommended language and updated maps.  We may also suggest some technical amendments.

 

Mr. Chairman, this concludes my statement.  I would be pleased to answer any questions you or any members of the subcommittee may have.

 

_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

 

Provided to the Shiloh Discussion Group by

 

THE MANASSAS BELLE

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Thanks for posting Ms Goldfuss's statement.

 

On the surface, it seems to me that the inclusion of Fallen Timbers in the SNMP is a good acquisition.  It is the site of the last action of the Battle of Shiloh.

 

I haven't taken the opportunity to visit the Corinth Interpretative Center, but it certainly seems that the Russell House is part of the Siege of Corinth and should be included in the NPS lands.  Similarly, Davis Bridge was an important part of the Corinth-Iuka imbroglio.

 

I have no idea what the meaning of "affiliated area" of the NPS means or how it would affect Parker's Crossroads.

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Transylvania and other SDG Members.....

 

Time will tell. 

 

If the Bill passes, the Draft General Management Plan, when developed, should be the document that gives the details, mission goals of the SNMP, issues related to the interpretation and visitor experience, partnerships, framework for management and maintenance, etc. and, eventually, will be the guide for the SNMP in the final version. 

 

(I remember pouring over the 329 page Draft General Management Plan and Environmental Impact Statement for the Gettysburg National Military Park in 1998 when they proposed building their new Visitors Center.  I provided my written comments to the NPS along with  3,200 other respondents.  I, also, attended Congressional hearings regarding its funding.   It was a long process.)

 

I'm not sure when the last SNMP General Management Plan was published.  (Anyone know?)  Perhaps the process to include these three sites within the SNMP will be simpler than Gettysburg's Visitors Center, but, it won't happen any time soon.  It will be interesting to see how it all evolves.

 

THE MANASSAS BELLE

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Hello all,

 

As some of you may know I used to have a regular column in the Daily Corinthian and my stories would be about Corinth during the war. Most of these can be found on the park website as "Parson's Ponderings." I am posting the piece about the Russell House (which my ancestor in the 54th Ohio had a small part in).

All the best, Tom.

 

“The Prettiest Little Fight of the War”

Daily Corinthian December 22, 2013

On the 10th of December, 2013, Senator Lamar Alexander ®, Tennessee, introduced S. 1785, “A bill to modify the boundary of the Shiloh National Military Park located in Tennessee and Mississippi.” If this bill is signed into law it means four battle sites could someday be added to, or affiliated with the park.

The bill itself does not transfer any property to the Park Service. No, all it does is change the authorized boundary of the park which would allow more acreage to be added at some later date. That’s the way it works, even if someone wanted to give us a big chunk of land, we are not allowed to take it unless it lies within the boundary approved by congress.

What is great about this bill is it includes two sites which, though located in Tennessee, are associated with Corinth; Davis Bridge on the Hatchie River and the Russell House.

You say you’ve never heard of the Russell House? Well warm up that cup of coffee and I’ll tell you a story.

This tale takes place mid-way through the Siege of Corinth in May, 1862. There were three Union armies working together to capture Corinth and the all-important railroad junction. On the right of the Union line was the Army of the Tennessee and on the far right of this army was Gen. William T. Sherman’s Fifth Division.

Sherman wanted a piece of real estate not far in front of his lines. It was on a low ridge overlooking the headwaters of Phillips Creek, a spot close to where the Purdy, Ridge and State Line roads came together. If you want to see the site, head north on Polk Street, (Old 45), to the Tennessee Line and there you are.

The Russell family owned a house and several out-buildings on the property which was occupied by a brigade of Mississippi infantry under the command of Gen. James R. Chalmers, a Holly Springs lawyer. Chalmers was not inclined to give the property to Sherman just because he wanted it.

On the 17th of May Sherman moved his troops like so many pieces on a chessboard. Two regiments were sent off to keep an eye on the road to the right while two more headed off to the left. On the main road, or Purdy Road, the 55th Illinois and 8th Missouri moved up to a bridge over Phillips Creek and waited for the word to move forward. The Russell House was ¾’s of a mile away.

When the word came the two Federal regiments crossed the bridge, ran along a “causeway” that spanned the bottom land, and up to a hill that overlooked the house. The Northerners moved forward slowly and fought with the Southern pickets who grudgingly fell back toward their main line at the house. General Morgan Smith, whose troops were making the attack, wrote, “The enemy retired sullenly, obstinately contesting the ground.”

As the Confederates fell back, “with great reluctance,” General Chalmers extended his reserve which came close to flanking Sherman’s line and threatened to undo everything the Union had accomplished. The Federal reserves on the right were brought up to counter this move and the fighting moved closer to the house. The boys in blue began cheering loudly to psych themselves up for the final effort.

Before the charge was sounded a Confederate bullet pierced the heart of Pvt. Andrew Jones. He dropped his gun, threw up his hands and yelled, “Hurrah for the Fifty-fifth!” and immediately fell dead on the ground.

Jones had miraculously survived an earlier wound at Shiloh when a small piece of buckshot hit him square in the forehead and came out the back of his head without breaking the skull. The small projectile had travelled right through his brain with no outward effect. He had cheated Death but Death found him at the Russell House.

Nearby were Sgt. Fred Ebersol and Pvt. Littlefield of the same regiment who were doing their best to take cover behind a small tree some fifty yards from the house. They made a tempting target but came out of the fight without a scratch. The tree, however, was later found to have been hit by thirty bullets.

Another casualty was William Dwyer of the 8th Missouri who had been promoted from sergeant to lieutenant that very morning, and three hours later he was dead in the Tennessee dust.

From their positions some one hundred yards from the house they could hear “some of the officers entreating and ordering their men to hold their ground and not run from the damned Yankees.”

The Southerners were taking casualties too. An officer was hit as he came out of the front door, the door frame covered with gore. Another officer was hit as he was using an upstairs window to peer out at the Federals. He mistook one of the movements he observed for a retreat and yelled out that the, “damned cowardly Yankees are running!” A moment later a bullet fired by Private Snyder of the 8th Missouri ended his life.

The skirmishing came to an end when a few pieces of Union artillery were hauled across the causeway and onto the hill. When the shells began to fall among his men General Chalmers wisely called on them to fall back and relenquish the house to the Federals.

At last the attackers rushed forward and took possession of the grounds. Inevitably, the men of the two regiments began to quarrel over claims of who had been the first to take the house. The 8th Missouri seemed to be winning the shouting match but Sgt. Ebersol of the 55th was having none of it. When Smith came up to see what the ruckus was about, Ebersol handed the general a Confederate canteen filled with whisky he had found in the house.

Smith took a swig and turned to the crowd. “Dry up, for if that [Missouri] regiment had gotten into the house first, nobody else would ever have found a canteen of whisky there.” Both regiments would end up stitching the honors “Russell House” on their battle flags.

The Federals pursued the Confederates for an additional three hundred yards before halting at the road junction as the sun was setting. The fight had lasted for three hours and Sherman’s Division held undisputed ownership of the hill, the house and the out buildings.

The cost in human lives was small by Civil War standards but no less devastating to the families who had lost husbands and sons. Smith lost ten killed and thirty-one wounded. Chalmers made no report of the action though twelve dead Southerners were found including a captain and two lieutenants.

A Southern prisoner was also taken and he was interrogated and revealed that the regiment had been issued brand new rifles straight from the box just two days before. Some were found scattered about the field, still loaded and never fired.

Sherman was delighted with the afternoon’s work, deeming the encounter, “The prettiest little fight of the war.” A new advance picket line was established and over the next few days a long line of earthworks was built right through the yard.

As for the house, it was burned to the ground a week later.

I hope this piece of property will someday be added to Shiloh National Military Park. There are a number of sites scattered about town with earthworks from the Siege of Corinth, but the Russell House would be the only protected property where actual fighting took place during the Siege. The first step is getting congress to adjust our boundary.

One last thought. Don’t confuse the Russell House property with the story in Wednesday’s paper about the West Corinth Elementary School. The old school property is already within the park boundary approved by the U. S. Congress and could easily be added to the park provided all parties are in agreement. Many of my stories talk about the October battle raging across the school grounds, including the one about Col. William P. Rogers leading the men of Texas and Alabama in the three tragic charges against Battery Robinett. To a guy like me, it is hallowed ground.

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Nothing wrong with watching from the side. Aids in longevity! Been in a nice cool spell, Chief, but the temp is going up this weekend and I may have to turn on the AC again. I've already had to turn it on 2 different days already!

Jim

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I would understand why the Davis Bridge battlefield would be added to Shiloh Nat'l Military Park, since it is a Corinth-related action. However, is there anything else that would be done out there? I visited the battlefield after the Epic Hike last November, and it seemed relatively well-preserved. What's the benefit to including it in the NPS?

 

With regards to Parker's Crossroads, Shiloh is the closest NPS site, I believe. However, it's an unrelated engagement. Plus, when I visited it two years, the battlefield seemed fairly well preserved and better interpreted than most smaller battlefields - including a small visitor center. Goodness knows that Shiloh is already underfunded and understaffed. I would think that adding Parker's Crossroads to their responsibility list would only further over-stretch the park staff.

 

Adam

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As far as adding Corinth sites to Shiloh NMP, it makes sense. Shiloh was really just the first engagement in the contest for the railroad crossing at Corinth. And while we're on the subject, what about adding Oliver's Hill?

Jim

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There would no financial issues/burdens with Parker's Crossroads. The bill would make them an "affiliated site" with the NPS, not particularly Shiloh. 

 

S. 1785 would also establish Parker's Crossroads Battlefield in the State of Tennessee as an affiliated area of the National Park System.  The bill designates the city of Parkers Crossroads and the Tennessee Historical Commission as the management entity for the affiliated area and authorizes the Secretary of the Interior to provide technical assistance and enter into cooperative agreements with the management entity for the purpose of providing financial assistance for the marketing, marking, interpretation, and preservation of the affiliated area.  As an affiliated area, Parker's Crossroads Battlefield would continue under non-federal ownership and management, but the owner would be required to administer the site consistent with laws applicable to units of the National Park System.

 

Affiliated areas comprise a variety of locations in the United States that preserve significant properties outside of the National Park System.  Some of these have been designated by Acts of Congress and others have been designated administratively.  All draw on technical assistance or financial aid from the National Park Service.

 

Davis Bridge would remain an unmanned site, interpreted on site by signage and distantly from the Corinth Civil War Interpretive Center. This would relieve lingering issues of long-term care and budget issues/restraints from the State of Tennessee.   

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tom..as to Parkersbeing "an affiltated site" maintained under the laws applicable of the NPS...does that mean we( am a member of Parkers Crossroads Battlefield assn)cant have our Lantern walks and other activities at nite on site?????thanks...

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Mona,

 

I don't think that anything would change in regards to programming or interpretation.as you recall, we have had evening programs in the past at both Shiloh and Corinth.

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Davis Bridge would remain an unmanned site, interpreted on site by signage and distantly from the Corinth Civil War Interpretive Center. This would relieve lingering issues of long-term care and budget issues/restraints from the State of Tennessee.   

 

Tom - would the same be true for Fallen Timbers, with the "distantly" part being covered at Shiloh? Are there any plans to add more interpretive signs out there? 

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