Jump to content
Shiloh Discussion Group
Ozzy

My post is here...

Recommended Posts

The following men, all with military experience, shared a common post: U.S. Grant; John A. Rawlins; Jefferson Davis; John B. Floyd; Robert Todd Lincoln.

Name that post.

 

Ozzy

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Perry

You are correct... and now, for the rest of the story. The Civil War generation had an unhealthy relationship with the office of Secretary of War (and not just because of the carnage the war produced.) In addition, a surprising number of Secretaries of War had connections to Fort Donelson, Shiloh, or both. Consider the following:

John B. Floyd (served 1857-1860)  Suspected misuse of Indian tribal monies/bonds; suspected pre-positioning of large quantities of war munitions in the South, just prior to Secession Crisis. [Floyd was later a veteran of Fort Donelson.]

Simon Cameron (1861-1862)  Suspected malfeasance while conducting the office resulted in his removal by President Lincoln.

Edwin Stanton (January 20, 1862-May 28, 1868)  Replaced Cameron in time to take credit for success at Fort Henry, Fort Donelson, and Shiloh. However, the removal of Major General McClellan as General-in-Chief by President Lincoln on March 11, 1862 may have contributed to the incomplete result of the New Orleans/Vicksburg operation by the team of Farragut and Benjamin Butler... allowing Vicksburg to replace Fort Columbus as Confederate 'Gibraltar of the West.'

U.S. Grant (August 1867-December 1867)  Appointed to the position by President Johnson in an effort to force Stanton out. Never confirmed by Congress [Veteran of Fort Donelson and Shiloh, of course.]

Lorenzo Thomas (recommended 1868)  The attempted appointment of the wartime Adjutant General of the Army as Secretary of War resulted in President Andrew Johnson's impeachment.

John Schofield (June 1, 1868-March 13, 1869)  The promise made by President Johnson (to certain parties behind the scenes, that he would appoint General Schofield as Secretary of War, if not found guilty at the impeachment trial) may have been enough to save Andrew Johnson... by one vote.

John A. Rawlins (Mar 13, 1869-September 6, 1869) Confidant and powerful staff officer, who served U.S. Grant from the start of the Civil War, through Grant going to Washington. Rawlins died from tuberculosis; and the office was assumed by another Shiloh veteran, William Tecumseh Sherman [who was Commanding General of the Army]. Sherman was Acting-Secretary of War for one month.

William W. Belknap (October 25, 1869-March 2, 1876)  Selected by President Grant to replace the Deceased John Rawlins, William Belknap became involved in several controversial affairs during his tenure (that contributed to the perception of Grant's Administration being corrupt). This Shiloh veteran eventually resigned... but was impeached at the order of the House of Representatives.

 

Just a bit of trivia, found on Wikipedia

Ozzy

 

N.B.  For those who track this information, then-Major William Belknap arrived at Pittsburg Landing in the wee hours of April 6, 1862... aboard the steamer Minnehaha.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

" U.S. Grant (August 1867-December 1867)  Appointed to the position by President Johnson in an effort to force Stanton out. Never confirmed by Congress [Veteran of Fort Donelson and Shiloh, of course.]"

This is a bit of new info for me. Thanks.

 

 

Jim

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jim

I believe Rudyard Kipling is given credit for the expression:  'A leopard never changes its spots.'

In trying to understand Shiloh, and how it was fought, it is necessary to understand the key people involved. The more one examines U.S. Grant, the more facets are revealed: he was a lot more complex than most folks realized. Yet he portrayed himself as 'a simple man, without political ambition.'

Just my observation...

Ozzy

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Really, I think the key person in the whole nonsense about the Secretary of War post was Andrew Johnston. Grant was caught in the middle and tried to keep the peace by accepting Johnston's request to keep Stanton's seat warm during the Tenure of Office nonsense. Johnston no doubt meant for the appointment to be permanent, but Grant wasn't having that, especially in light of the rift with Congress. I think the Radicals were right in the big-picture of Reconstruction, but Johnston was right on this particular issue. The President had/has the right to fire his own cabinet members without asking the Senate's permission. 

I don't know that Grant cultivated an image of a simple man without political ambition though. He's sometimes portrayed that way, but I don't think he consciously did so himself. I don't think he really had any real political ambitions until after the war. Unlike say, George McClellan. But I do think he was more complex, and also more intelligent, than his detractors like to portray him. He was very human, when you get down to it. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ozzy...when i read your  post above tracing through the se c of war..in rawlins post it is mentioned that aftyer he died that sherman assumed the office..then the next post it says that belknap filled the post..was sherman in this office for just a month or so? thanks mona

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...