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58th Illinois

Hello from 58th Illinois

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I'm Pat.  Retired Marine.  Live in NC.  First visited Shiloh in the 70's while in NATTC Memphis.  While doing Genealogy in the past few years, I discovered my great Grandfather fought at Fort Donelson and Shiloh with the 58th Illinois.  So I made a few more trips and read many more books.  Found GGpa patrick was captured with most of his regiment at the end of the first day, imprisoned at Corinth, Tuscaloosa, and Montgomery before being paroled.  Had the great pleasure this past month of doing a 3 day Civil War Tour led by Ed Bearss and Tim Smith.  Certainly a great experience!  Hope to learn much more from this group.

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Welcome, Pat

Your mention of the 58th Illinois and experience of your G-Grandfather (Patrick) provides an opportunity to review references available for those with Civil War (Union) ancestors taken prisoner at Shiloh:

  • place the word "prisoner" in the search box at top of this page, and over 80 hits come back: some contain references of use in tracking general POW information;
  • on Google, search for "cahaba prison" and then click on "CivilWarPrisons.com" ...in the new page, if I enter "McKinnis" [Last Name] and "12th Iowa" [Regiment] a new page results, with a summary of George McKinnis' Prisoner of War record. [Although this information may not be 100 percent accurate, it indicates your ancestor is on file at NARA, and further information is available to fine-tune dates and locations]. Also, no need to enter first name in this search (although spelling of Last Name is important, so try variations if no result, first time);  http://www.civilwarprisoners.com/search.php?database=cahaba  
  • A Perfect Picture of Hell by Ted Genoways and Hugh Genoways; University of Iowa Press (2001) although showcasing the 12th Iowa, provides detailed descriptions of the Southern prisons experienced by 14th Iowa, 15th Michigan, 23rd Missouri, 58th Illinois... In the case of the 12th Iowa, upon capture they were herded into a disused cornfield south of the battlefield (spent the night in the rain) then marched with 2000 other Federal prisoners south to Corinth; after a few hours in Corinth, shipped by cattle cars to Memphis (overnight in Bradley Block, overlooking Mississippi River); train south from Memphis to Jackson, then east to Meridian, then south to Mobile, Alabama; paddle steamer up the Alabama River (dropping off senior officers at Selma, including Benjamin Prentiss) with final stop at Montgomery (and incarceration in Cotton Shed Prison, current site of Montgomery Biscuits Baseball). Some prisoners paroled in May 1862; remainder transfered by train to Macon, Georgia (Camp Oglethorpe,  south of the intersection of Oglethorpe Street and 5th Street) where they remained until October 1862. Train north to Libby Prison at Richmond (where one or two days spent processing out of Confederate control); march to Aiken's Landing on James River; steamer north to incarceration at Annapolis Maryland Parole Camp (until mid-November) when exchange confirmed, and former prisoners sent by train west to Benton Barracks Missouri to rejoin their regiment (December 1862-March 1863);
  • Beyond the Lines: a Yankee Prisoner loose in Dixie by Captain J.J. Geer (48th Ohio, taken prisoner two days prior to Battle of Shiloh during "Picket Skirmish" and incarcerated with other Shiloh prisoners) published by J. Daughaday at Philadelphia (1863)   http://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=miun.ack4820.0001.001;view=1up;seq=3  [Thanks to HathiTrust]

[For those with Confederate ancestors taken prisoner by the North, see "Confederate Prisoners" in Aftermath and Impact on this SDG site http://shilohdiscussiongroup.com/index.php?/topic/1522-record-of-csa-prisoners/#comment-10051 ]

All the best

 

Ozzy

 

 

 

 

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Welcome to the group Pat,

 

        As my great-great-grandfather was also with the 58thIllinois and was captured at Shiloh and held as a prisoner until October 1862 I have studied the regiment for a long time.

            I have a roster of the regiment and if you would state your great grandpa’s full name I could look for him in the roster. The only officer I found with the first name of Patrick was Patrick Gregg. Some of the privates from Shiloh got paroled in May but others did not get paroled until October.

            As Ed Bearss was a marine I am sure it added to the experience of being on a battlefield with him.

            There is lots of information on this site and the search option can help you find it. Search the 58thIllinois and you will find numerous postings that should be of interest.

            I have been to every battlefield the 58thIllinois fought on during the war.

            The purpose of this forum is to share information so ask away.

 

Cheers,

 

Hank

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Hank, He was pvt. Patrick J. Farmer of Company H from LaSalle county Illinois.  I have a very limited record from National Archives, and very blurry pay record shows captured with Prentiss's surrender, then Corinth, Tuscaloosa, Montgomery, then paroled through Camp Parole Md.  Have not found an actual roster of any of those places with his actual name.  Know he eventually went back to Cairo, made Cpl., then disappeared for 8 years.

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Pat

Noticed your recent post, and thought I'd check in and see how your search for Patrick Farmer, 58th Illinois, Company H is progressing.

Glad you found the book by Genoways & Genoways of interest. If you would like more information about the Parole Camp at Annapolis, the best resource is A Low and Dirty Place: the Parole Camps of Annapolis, MD, 1862 - 1865 by R. Rebecca Morris. Published in 2012, the book is available at Ann Arrundell County Historical Society, PO Box 385, Linthicum, Maryland 21090. Not only provides detail of the "tent city" used, west of the Naval Academy buildings (put to use as Hospital), but provides insight into the mindset of many (who had no sympathy for Prisoners, believing they had caused their own capture.)

Just curious: you mention that Patrick Farmer disappeared for eight years. Were you able to establish his whereabouts? Did he eventually "turn up," and reestablish himself, in Illinois or elsewhere, after time had passed?

All the best

 Ozzy

Reference: C-Span video, A Low and Dirty Place  (published September 2013)

 

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Good video, Ozzy.  Most of my info on my ggpa comes from genealogy and national archives sources as he left nothing in writing or it was lost..  When he left camp Parole, he went back to his company in Cairo Ill.  When he left there (apparently without authorization), the next record is his marriage in Illinois about 8 years later.  He then went west in the late 1870's, settling in Nebraska and farming.  He died there in 1929 at age 87.  The next three generations of Farmers, including me, were born in Neb.

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Pat

You indicate Patrick Farmer "was released from Montgomery; passed through Libby Prison, Richmond; sent to Camp Parole, Annapolis; arrived Cairo, Illinois to join his regiment." Would be interesting to find out what was his actual path from Tuscaloosa, because there were four possibilities:

1)   Sent from Tuscaloosa to Montgomery, arriving before May 24th 1862. Released on Parole by Confederate authorities, over one thousand privates (and at least two officers, who passed themselves off as privates in order to escape) rode the train north from Montgomery; boarded steamers in the Tennessee River; disembarked from boats near Huntsville, Alabama (in Federal control); sent north by General Ormsby Mitchel to vicinity of Nashville (where Union Prisoners on Parole confined in de facto Parole Camp, pending disposition); Paroled prisoners sent west from Nashville, mostly to Benton Barracks (awaiting proper exchange, in order to rejoin regiments and return to service).

2)   Of those sent from Tuscaloosa to Montgomery, many men arrived too late... and missed the train out of Montgomery. These men were confined with non-commissioned officers and officers at Cotton Shed Prison, Montgomery, until the whole force was transferred (May 30th) by train to Macon, Georgia and confined at Camp Oglethorpe (an expansive site of many acres, former fairground, with stalls and proper buildings that could be used for Hospital and shelter from the rain and sun; big enough, that the prisoners played baseball here... until a Commandant put an end to "amusements," and cut their rations.) Officers all moved from Camp Oglethorpe to Madison, Georgia prison in July. Sergeants and below released on Parole in October, and left Macon on the train; switched trains several times until arrival at Richmond (and confinement two or three days, for out-processing.) Hike 12 miles (many prisoners had lost nearly half their pre-confinement weight by this point, and there were a number of deaths during the journey from Macon to Aiken's Landing. Officers rode the steamer New York; enlisted men rode the John A. Warner to Fortress Monroe for in-processing to Union control. Officers continue journey to Annapolis, pass through, and are released at Washington, D.C. (on 30-days of furlough, upon completion to report to their regiments, or Benton Barracks.) John A. Warner steams up Chesapeake Bay and drops off enlisted prisoners at Annapolis, one day after officers arrived aboard New York; and on or about October 20th 1862, enlisted paroled prisoners confined in "tent city" about two miles west, southwest of old Naval Academy. At least twenty more deaths of Shiloh prisoners occur while awaiting transfer to "points west" (mostly Camp Chase and Benton Barracks) which is accomplished by late November.

3)   Escape (at least a dozen prisoners managed to escape, at some point 6 April - 30 September 1862. The story of the Rhodes brothers and their associates, stealing a small boat and paddling down various rivers and through Georgia swamps, all the way to the Atlantic Ocean... and rescue by the U.S. Navy, is remarkable.)

4)   Of the 1000 or more privates released in May [item 1, above] nearly 500 were not accepted by General Mitchel (who claimed the Parole was "without authority" ...and besides, he did not have enough food for his own men, and these released prisoners.) So this last boat was turned away, within site of Federal camps on the shore, and returned south. In June, these prisoners all went into confinement with their fellows at Camp Oglethorpe... until October.

http://iagenweb.org/allamakee/history2/chap23.htm#regiments  Diary of Corporal Frank Hancock, 12th Iowa, Co.B covers the period 1 January - 18 October 1862. Confined in the Cotton Shed Prison at Montgomery, Hancock records departure of the privates in May; his own transfer to Camp Oglethorpe in June; refused Union prisoners arriving Camp Oglethorpe on June 18th; departure from Macon October 8th (and all the train connections made, til Richmond.) [Scroll down third of the way to find diary.]

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=43741052  Annapolis National Cemetery. Corporal Frank Hancock.

Regards

Ozzy

 

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The "Memorandum from Prisoner of War Records" that I received from the National Archives show :  Confined at Corinth, then confined at Tuscaloosa Ala. April 15/16/62, sent to Montgomery May 15th 62..  Copies of pay record are very poor.  Indicate Camp Parole, yet Memorandum, which is nearly illegible, by magnifying, can now make out (I think), "present at bb mo. (Benton Barracks ?  ) aug. 30/62 - on m r aug 18, 62.  A lot of conflicting info, but now think that option 1 that you cited may be it.  Thanks for the research  Ozzy. 

Pat

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Pat

If you believe Patrick Farmer was one of the 1000 privates released "on special Parole" from Montgomery on May 24th 1862, then review the diary entries of Joseph B. Dorr (QM of 12th Iowa Infantry) pages 103- 4 in A Perfect Picture of Hell. J.B. Dorr escaped captivity (along with Lieutenant John Elwell, 12th Iowa, Co.E and (possibly) Captain William McMichael, on the staff of General WHL Wallace) by passing themselves off as Privates: exchanged clothing and identities with men who remained behind, in captivity. Quartermaster Dorr's diary details route traveled to reach General Ormsby Mitchel's lines, and continued journey to Nashville.

All the best

Ozzy

 

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