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rwaller

David Greenspan Illustrator

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Greenspan Shiloh.JPGI was wondering if anyone else remembers these great illustrations which appeared in Bruce Catton's 'The Civil War' published in 1960, back at the time of the Civil War Centennial. I still remember how fascinating they were to me as a kid.

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Hello Everyone, not much is known about the artist David Greenspan other than he lived in Brooklyn, New York, and was a very prolific illustrator for American Heritage completing detailed drawings of all the major civil war battles for Bruce Catton's book along with illustrations of some revolutionary war battles and I think I remember his illustrations of the national parks and I've heard of other series. David passed away at the age of 39. His illustrations of civil war battles inspired many young people to learn more about the war and American history. His drawings have also inspired modern video game designers as well.

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I grew up reading the American Heritage / Catton book from my dad's extensive collection.  The text, photos, and illustrations were my primary point of reference in those early years (1960s).

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Thank you YEKCIM, That is a great  book. I've bought many copies over the years for gifts and as a way spark interest in young people. You just don't know where it will lead. I saw a nephew recently that I had given that book years ago and he told me how much it meant to him. You just never know. 

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Hello and Happy New Year Everyone.

Now for some nit-pick.  The very interesting map shown above by Greenspan has some flaws such as the Purdy Road is misnamed.  The Purdy Road is the next road below.  The Purdy road ran past the Barnes field, which is the farm shown in the picture in the center but at the lower edge of map.  The Lost Field (the remnants of) use to be to the west of the Barnes Field (shown on map) and was abandoned when William C  Barnes entered the confederate army.  He served and died in the 34th Tennessee Infantry.  He was the farmer who cleared the land which fell into disuse later.  The Lost Field is not shown on the mapThe name plate for the Western Corinth Road as shown in on the map is actually in the wrong position.  It should be where the Purdy Road name appears.   The name of the Main Corinth Road should be here on the road running past to the Duncan Field, and onward to the Pittsburg Landing.  This name appears on the Trailhead Graphics map as simply the Corinth Road.  The road on the map shown with the number 2 is the Western Corinth Road.  The trail appearing below the Barnes Field, running from the Eastern Corinth Road to the Western Corinth Road is known today as the Peabody Road.

It is a nice map but with errors.  The fun is finding the errors.  I hope you have a great year.  Mine started poorly with the Michigan Wolverines in a unbelievable game.  You need to watch the last quarter of this game. 

Ron       

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Hello Ron, Happy New Year to you. Oh yes there are lots of mistakes. This is just a small detail of a much larger map. I will try to get the whole map up on the site. It's fun to look at, but really its a kids map, not to be taken too seriously. I first saw it at the age of 9, my older sister got the book for me for my birthday. I was fascinated by it. Greenspan did quite a number of these for the book of pretty much every major battle. Take care. 

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Roger

I see the Greenspan Map as a commendable attempt to make sense of the jumbled spiderweb of tracks and laneways that existed at the onset of the Battle of Shiloh (that mapping effort completed years before the Age of the Internet, and requiring countless library visits, probably in different cities around America.)

Concerning the names of the roads, I imagine the locals knew where the roads ran, and had names for them... but it does not appear that the locals were consulted IRT those names [look no further than "the Sunken Road" as one attempt to create clarity from chaos.] Perhaps the senior Federal officers simply did not believe they would be in the neighbourhood long enough to be bothered "with minute details."  Case in point: William Tecumseh Sherman, the one man who described himself as "knowing the ground best, both inside and outside our lines" [from Memoirs]. Yet his map (in use at time of the battle, and loaned to Don Carlos Buell upon that Commander's arrival) lists only the following roads:

  • "to Purdy"
  • "to Corinth"
  • "to Corinth"
  • "Road to Crump's Landing"
  • "to Hamburg."

And if the "most knowledgeable Federal officer" labelled some roads (and failed to label all others), imagine the awareness of junior officers and men-in-ranks: knowing the name and location of their own regiment's campsite; aware that Pittsburg Landing "was along that road" ...and Corinth was down that a-way.

My two-bob

Ozzy

References:  Sherman's Memoirs page 229.

http://shilohdiscussiongroup.com/index.php?/topic/1810-shermans-shiloh-map/

 

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