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Available online from the University of Iowa Library are these three diaries (for years 1861, 1862 and 1863) written by 20-year-old schoolteacher, Turner S. Bailey. Working in Epworth, Iowa (about three miles west of Dubuque) at the start of 1861, his diary for that year focuses on teaching classes, the weather, and local issues... until April 15th. "Considerable excitement about war. Fort Sumter taken by the South."  Beginning with that entry, Turner indicates growing preoccupation with "war fever" until enlisting in the 3rd Iowa Co. A  at Dubuque on May 22nd; travelling with the regiment to Keokuk in June; and duty in Missouri (guarding railroads) beginning in July. 

In March 1862, it was decided to add the 3rd Iowa to the growing Federal force on the Tennessee River; Private Bailey arrived opposite Pittsburg Landing on the 15th. On the 17th the 3rd Iowa went ashore at Pittsburg Landing and went into camp near "their friends in the 12th Iowa." Each subsequent day is faithfully recorded -- the weather, the skirmish on April 4th -- and of course, the Battle of April 6/7.

On the attached link, click on the desired diary... a new page will open... click on the diary again for access to every page. [University of Iowa adds another diary, or collection of Civil War letters, about every 3-6 months, so worthwhile to check back every once in a while to see what's been made available.]

http://www.iowaheritage.org/items/browse?advanced[0][element_id]=49&advanced[0][type]=is+exactly&advanced[0][terms]=Infantry

Cheers

Ozzy

 

 

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Thanks for the post! I had looked at the Bailey diary and found it just as you describe. The 12th and the 3rd were both recruited from NE Iowa with considerable overlap in the Dubuque area. Mathew Mark Trumbull recruited Company I of the 3rd from that area. Another 3rd Diary is in the Grinnell College library of Samuel Wright. Unfortunately he died from pneumonia at Quincy around the time the 3rd went to Benton Barracks, but he did participate in the campaign to protect the Hannibal and SJ RR in 1861, though he was a hospital steward and was not at Blue Mills. His brother also served in the 3rd. Mrs. Ophelia Amigh had a baby named Benton B. Amigh in summer of '61 and was back with the 3rd in August as a regimental nurse. 

"Died - 8 June Benton B. Amigh, youngest child of Oscar M. and Ophelia Amigh, died in St. Louis, Mo, of whooping cough, aged 1 yr. 9 mos. 8 days. This little one was born in Camp Benton, St. Louis, and has ever been the petted child of the 3rd Ia. Inf. Regt. of which both parents were members at the time of his birth. Many brave soldiers mourn his death, for they had wished to see him, like themselves, a true hearted defender of his country. from: Charles City [Iowa] Intelligencer, 2 July 1863."

Trumbull's career is nicely described in Iowa's Forgotten General https://www.uipress.uiowa.edu/books/2007-fall/lyftiowfo.html. Trumbull was wounded in the head late in the day of the 6th and would have been captured except Joe McGinnis of the 3rd came along and that burly Iowa lad picked Trumbull up and carried him off the field.

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Rbn3

You're probably familiar with these next two sites, but for those who have yet to encounter them:

http://iagenweb.org/civilwar/regiment/index.html   Iowa GenWeb is an ongoing project that is attempting to be a one-stop-shop for all things Iowa History related. This link takes you to the 3rd Iowa Infantry.

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSln=bailey&GSiman=1&GScid=95642&GRid=78010095&   And as regards Turner S. Bailey, the rest of his story can be found at find-a-grave (where the incomplete 1863 diary finds its explanation.)

Ozzy

 

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Thanks for reminding me of the links. Here's the link to 3rd Iowa diary of Samuel Wright. Since he died prior to Shiloh, this may not be in your sweet spot. You can read about the "Rarey method" though. Samuel also records elements of his life in the lead up to enlisting, which is not found in many diaries. He was a medical student studying with the local doc as his preceptor. This was the educational path followed by nearly all physicians prior to the Civil War. A couple of years with a preceptor then 2 sixteen week courses at a proprietary school and then your degree was awarded by the local medical society. The Keokuk medical school was the only one in Iowa in the early 50's and was the nidus for the current U of Iowa med school.

http://iagenweb.org/marion/people/families/WrightSamuelMarion.php

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Rbn3

Had a look at the Diary of Samuel Wright... quite interesting, in a number of ways. It begins much like the 1861 journal by Turner Bailey: preoccupation with personal and local events, with no mention of "the gathering storm," until April 19th... when everything changes. War and war preparations rule supreme; and Wright's diary acts as support for Bailey's information, until August 18th, when it appears Wright was called to work in the hospital (as nurse?) and makes frequent mention of Dr. Daniel Cool, afterwards.

In his role as Nurse, Samuel Wright records "making up dose-envelopes of quinine" (Aug 18) and "milking borrowed cows" (Aug 19). I believe quinine was used to combat ague (a mosquito-borne disease); and drinking milk was seen as treatment for diarrhea. But some of the later entries in the diary are more concerning, as it appears Samuel Wright took ill about January 8th 1862 while working in the Hospital at Quincy. First, there is mention of "being given a dose of Veratrine" (Jan 8) followed by a "large dose of Morphia" (Jan 9). Wright's health waxes and wanes, and he continues with his Hospital duties (when able) until January 31st, he makes mention of making up "bluebonnet pills."  On February 9th 1862 Samuel Wright died, and was buried in Quincy, Illinois.

[I suspect that "bluebonnet pills" refers to calomel, a mercury-based concoction used as home remedy, and widely used by the U.S. Army until banned by Surgeon General Hammond in 1863. The other substance, Veratrine, I believe was a poison, too.]

Ozzy

N.B.. Dr. Daniel Cool replaced Thomas Edwards as Regimental Surgeon after Edwards resigned in April 1862.

 

 

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Quinine was used for ague, which was one of the many names for malaria. When Charles Dickens traveled the Midwest he was very taken by the sickliness of the population, mostly from remittent fever/auge/malaria.

Milk wasn't always good medicine. Lincoln said McClellen had the slows. Lincoln's mother died from it. Think snakeroot.

Bluebonnet pills must be distinguished from Blue pills. Bluebonnets are a lupine, a staple of the botanical doc's of the 1850's. It was used a purgative. Blue pills are indeed calomel and this "medicine" dates to Paracelsus in the 16th century. It also was used to treat malaria, but was mainly also a purgative. A Civil War nurse named Walt Whitman may have been killed by it. If the mercury doesn't cook your brain (think Mad Hatter), it ruins the kidneys. The latter claimed Whitman. Dysentery was the scourge of Shiloh but that doesn't mean that the surgeons didn't use both.

Veratrine, alkaloids from sababilla (a lily like plant), was another botanical thought to be good for rheumatism...which Wright apparently had.

The Thomsonians (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samuel_Thomson) were popular on the frontier and they represented a beneficial backlash to the harsh Brunonians who ruled the 18th century (and killed Washington with therapeutic phlebotomies). https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brunonian_system_of_medicine

 

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Rbn3

Thanks for the clarification IRT Civil War medicines, and the diseases those medicines attempted to cure.

As regards all-things-3rd Iowa, one resource you may not have considered is Franc Bang Wilkie's Iowa First: Letters from the War (published late in 1861). Wilkie was a Dubuque newspaperman who "embedded" himself with the 1st Iowa, tracking their development from "Governor's Greys" to the 10-company regiment that took shape as the regiment steamed down river to eventual destination of Keokuk. Of particular interest: the week-long stop in Davenport, where so many men arrived on a daily basis, that there were more than enough for two additional infantry regiments, and a battery of light artillery. Governor Samuel Kirkwood persuaded the Leaders in Washington, and the 2nd Iowa and 3rd Iowa formed and began training within days of the 1st Iowa.

Wilkie's book is a compilation of letters, written from wherever he happened to be, back to the editor of the Dubuque Herald. In these lengthy letters, full of detail (and wit) are these bits of particular interest:

  • pages 7-15 Letter No.2 of April 25th:  Details of the stay in Davenport;
  • page 20 Letter No.8 of May 12th from Keokuk:  Voting for Colonel of the Regiment;
  • pages 27-8 Letter No.11 of May 26:  Keokuk camp renamed Camp Ellsworth; Wilkie records that the 2nd Iowa and 3rd Iowa have arrived, and provides a list of their senior officers: also, the result of 1st Iowa vote provided;
  • page 38 Letter No.14 of June 6th:  Parade in company with 2nd Iowa (out of respect for Senator Stephen A. Douglas, who died June 3rd);
  • page 39 Letter No.15 of June 9th from Camp Ellsworth:  Wilkie reports that "the 3rd Iowa is to be mustered in tomorrow," and details "the quest for the colonelcy of the 3rd Iowa," with all potential contenders listed;
  • page 42 Letter No.15:  List of those potential members of the 3rd Iowa who refused to take the oath.

Regards

Ozzy

Reference:  http://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=hvd.hwhj6e;view=1up;seq=5  Wilkie's First Iowa

N.B.  Following the August 10th Battle at Wilson's Creek, the 3-month enlistments of the 1st Iowa Volunteer Infantry expired,and the men returned to their homes in the Hawkeye State. But most were not out of uniform long: they acted as recruiting agents, promoting the formation of new, 3-year regiments (such as the 7th Iowa and 12th Iowa -- both regiments at Shiloh contained 1st Iowa veterans.)

In regards to "Larrikin," here in Australia the common usage refers to "a person who is the life of the party -- any party -- always ready with a joke, and able to find the silly-side to even the most revered institutions and personages... And a larrikin refuses to suffer fools lightly, because he "knows" he has the inside track in regard to knowledge of every event (and why that event is being conducted)." Far from being a "shirker," a larrikin is willing and able to do the work, but just requires special handling to get him on-side. I would agree that Mark Twain, Henry Lawson... even Franc Bangs Wilkie seems to fit the mold. And from my readings of operations of the 3rd Iowa Infantry, something furnished that regiment with a streak of irreverence: perhaps it followed on from the leadership merry-go-round they experienced; or being used to guard railroads in Missouri too long; or maybe it was just the "general attitude" of that particular group of volunteers. (Interesting how just a handful of leaders can determine the personality of their organization.)

 

 

 

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Thanks so much for the Wilkie clue...somehow both Dr. Google and I missed it!!  If you want to peruse who gave 3rd Iowa its soul, you might not have to look much further than "Wheelbarrow". https://archive.org/details/wheelbarrowarti00trumgoog

Wheelbarrow also wrote letters to the Dubuque newspaper. Clarence Darrow gave a eulogy at his funeral. He was a British "Chartist" who became a champion of labor in Chicago and helped to defend the Haymarket "Rioters". Thompson lauds him in his book.

Mrs. Ophelia Amigh was also "in" the 3rd. She was 23 when she enlisted as nurse with her husband Oscar. She had a baby at Benton Barracks and named him "Benton B". Wright mentions both Ophelia and Oscar in his diary. Ophelia also tried to get Dr. Edwards fired. She was an angelic despot who was maybe right, maybe wrong, but never in doubt. 

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Wheelbarrow... an interesting read. And it puts me in mind of something that emerges from the study of the Battle of Shiloh: so many of the "survivors" of that Battle appear to have been "altered" (but not in the way one would expect). The experience sharpened the drive of many to "do better, and be better." In many cases, the quest for excellence became extraordinary:

  • Ambrose Bierce.  Would he have become the outstanding writer, whose works still find popularity today, without his exposure to "the Elephant?"
  • John Wesley Powell.  An artillery officer who lost an arm at Shiloh; and after the War, explored the American West more skillfully than could most men with two arms.
  • Seymour Thompson.  Honed his perception of right and wrong -- and what was "justice" -- and became a noted judge.
  • Lew Wallace.  Questioning and contemplating his own role at Shiloh (and his other war experiences), and how they related to the "Grand Scheme" led him to write Ben Hur.

Then, there are the politicians: at least four Shiloh survivors aspired to become President (two succeeded.) But there were countless others who entered politics at lower levels; most -- I would imagine -- wanted to "change things for the better" ...much like Matthew Mark Trumbull.

Ozzy

 

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Another nice analysis. Thank you.

Most people know of John Wesley Powell know him as a naturalist and as the virtual founder of the USGS. Had his instincts prevailed, Cadillac Desert may not have been needed. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cadillac_Desert

I have no statistics to back this up, but it seems to me many marriages of Shiloh survivors perished in its aftermath. Thompson wrote of Trumbull, p 329, "...soon tendered his resignation for reasons which were well understood and appreciated by his friends." The reason was that his wife left him, some of his children, and Iowa and went to Colorado with another man. She only took the youngest of their children with her. Trumbull remarried a woman from Iowa shortly after. 

Shiloh nurses Belle Reynolds and Ophelia Amigh had interesting professional careers for decades in Chicago. The former was a physician at the Chicago Home for the Friendless and the latter a superintendent of a state home for "female offenders". The former's husband, Lt. Reynolds of 17th Illinois, had a successful real estate career in California. The latter's husband, Pvt Oscar Amigh of 3rd Iowa, lived to an old age in Clinton, New York. He was never "right in the head" after Shiloh. He did receive a gunshot wound there.  As far as I know neither couple were divorced, but they were clearly separated.

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Rbn3

Excellent observation about the "effect on families." Rare would be the family that was not negatively impacted during the Civil War -- on both sides -- due to concern for loved ones (often not knowing for weeks at a time where they were); injury, sickness or death to loved ones (on the battlefield, and back at home); stress of single-parent households attempting to cope with children (and the husband's abandoned business pursuits: farming, running a store, etc.)

Another unintentional experience of the 3rd Iowa Infantry that affected men, and their families back home, was that of Prisoner of War. David W. Reed's Battle of Shiloh records thirty members of the 3rd Iowa as "missing." Most of those men were likely taken prisoner following the Stand at the Hornet's Nest; and record of some of them (and the brutality suffered by all of them) can be found in A Perfect Picture of Hell: eyewitness accounts by Civil War Prisoners from the 12th Iowa by Ted and Hugh Genoways, Uni Iowa Press (2001). In my copy of the book, I have found mention of Lieutenant David O'Neill (3rd Iowa Co.A) who is sometimes miss-identified as "Dan O'Neill" and "Captain O'Neill" on pages 66, 97, 100 and 300. Following capture on the afternoon of April 6th, O'Neill was marched away south with the other 2000-plus Federal prisoners, and confined in an old cornfield about five miles southwest of Pittsburg Landing overnight. In an attempt to combat the heavy rain that began about 10pm O'Neill shared a blanket with Lieutenant Luther Jackson (12th Iowa Co.H). Next morning, the prisoners were marched south to Corinth; took the M & C R.R. to Memphis; took various trains south through Jackson, Mississippi to end of the line at Mobile. Boarded the steamer James Battle for voyage up the Alabama River, to destination of Montgomery (where 600 enlisted men and officers below rank of Captain were confined in a cotton storage yard (partially roofed) for the next two months. In June, the POWs were removed by rail to Macon, Georgia and kept at the site of the old fairgrounds (Camp Oglethorpe): 1200-2200 men were confined here until "released on their Parole" in October, and moved by rail in a zig-zag meander up the states of Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, Virginia... stopping finally at Richmond (for overnight confinement in Libby Prison for out-processing from Confederate control.) Leaving behind about 300 prisoners who had already died (one of whom was Luther Jackson) the surviving Federal prisoners -- many of whom had lost nearly half their April 1862 body weight -- marched 12 miles to Aiken's Landing on the James River and met with the Flag of Truce boat (some took the New York; others boarded the John A. Warner) and commenced a voyage down the James; overnight stop at Fortress Monroe (to process in to Federal control); up Chesapeake Bay, arriving at Annapolis, Maryland about October 19th. Here, the enlisted men were confined in a Federal Parole Camp; the officers were sent by rail to Washington, D.C. for debrief. After a day or two in Washington, the officers continued west by rail to their home states for 30 days of leave, before reporting for duty at Davenport or Benton Barracks.

Another 3rd Iowa personality mentioned in A Perfect Picture of Hell is Major William Stone, with entries on pages 106, 113, 133, 143-4, 158 and 304. His journey into captivity mirrors Lieutenant O'Neill's until the voyage of the James Battle: Major Stone and the other senior officers (including General Benjamin Prentiss) were disembarked at Selma, Alabama and confined at Selma... then briefly at Talladega... then back at Selma until May, when the senior officers were removed to Madison, Georgia (where eventually all Federal officers were confined -- including, eventually, David O'Neill -- until the October Parole and the train journey north)... Except for Major Stone and two other Federal officers, sent north by Confederate authorities (with approval from General Prentiss) to attempt a prisoner exchange arrangement for all the Shiloh prisoners. Major Stone left for Washington, D.C. in May; after meeting with Federal authorities, he went on to Iowa.

A Perfect Picture of Hell... an outstanding introduction to the experience of Shiloh prisoners in Confederate confinement.

Ozzy

 

N.B.  Of the three Federal officers sent north from Selma, Alabama to attempt the prisoner exchange, my favourite is Captain Patrick Gregg. A Doctor in Rock Island, Illinois before the War, he joined the 58th Illinois as Commander of  Company K, and was captured with most of the 58th Illinois holding the western end of WHL Wallace's Line. Selected as one of the Commissioners, Captain Gregg took his responsibility seriously; and he refused to accept defeat until he had personally met with President Lincoln. The President advised Gregg that "plans were in work" for the exchange agreement he proposed; and the President offered Patrick Gregg the same "personal exchange" that the other two Commissioners (including Major Stone) had accepted. But Captain Gregg refused the offer. Instead, he demanded to be "returned to Selma, Alabama so he could report personally to General Prentiss the outcome of this meeting." Lincoln granted the "demand" and sent Captain Gregg away back south to continued confinement. When Patrick Gregg reported to Prisoner of War Camp Madison, Georgia, he had in his possession several trunks of new clothes (replacing the mere rags many prisoners wore), and a bag of gold coins (a month's pay for each Federal officer in confinement.)

Captain Patrick Gregg was released on Parole with all the other Shiloh prisoners in October 1862.

 

 

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Another great essay on the 3rd and the 12th! Thanks again.

One way for families to cope was to remain together, as in the picture below.

I have just ordered  A Perfect Picture of Hell  used from Amazon. Major Stone was an interesting guy. He was the 6th Governor of Iowa in 1863, easily defeating fellow Shiloh officer James Tuttle. The definitive historical repository of facts, Wikipedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_M._Stone asserts Stone returned to Confederate captivity after the failed exchange negotiations, and was paroled in the exchange of August 1862. I intend to learn more about Dr. Gregg of Rock Island (where the Keokuk medical school was located before it moved down and across the River.) 

A minute difference between the two Dubuque-centric regiments is that the 3rd had modified '48 Springfields and the 12th had rifled Enfields. I have read some opinions that the 3rd's "buck and ball" was the more effective ordinance at Shiloh (Thompson bragged about it) with its scattered small open fields limiting the advantage of the Enfield's superior range. I return to Sam Houston's description of the "simoon" walking into a volley of buck and ball from the 3rd on Monday. I like this video: 

 

Family in Civil War.JPG

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Rbn3

The Hungarian history teacher who is site-owner of < capandball.eu > has compiled an excellent collection of videos, illustrating performance of American Civil War infantry weapons, including 1853 Enfield, the Lorentz, and various models of Springfield muskets. Two points of interest in the above video, comparing rifled minie to smoothbore ball to buck-and-ball: the rifled minie had an effective range of 600 yards (hitting a man-sized target) when fired from the 1853 Enfield. But the Mexican War of 1846 tactics in use during the Civil War did not appropriately take advantage of this stand-off range. The one-size-fits-all approach consigned all infantry muskets to the same "thirty paces away -- fire!" usage (miss-usage.) 

The second point: misfires were common. And reaction to misfire depended on the shooter: did the weapon fire, or not? Replace the cap and try again? There were Enfield rifle-muskets found on the battlefield after the battle with three loads of powder-and-minie ball rammed down the barrel, in desperation to get the weapon to fire.

In regard to Major Stone, acting as Commissioner for Prisoner Exchange: there are a variety of resources that explain his movements after arrival in Washington (and possibly the most accurate describes him accompanying Captain Gregg to Libby Prison, where it was decided Patrick Gregg would continue on to Madison, Georgia (he arrived there July 14th); and William Stone returned North. [I have found no report that the 3rd Commissioner, Colonel Madison Miller of the 18th Missouri, returned South with Stone and Gregg.]

Ozzy

Reference:  http://uipress.lib.uiowa.edu/bdi/DetailsPage.aspx?id=364  Bio dictionary of Iowa: Wm. Stone

 

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You are right about the misfires - even under the controlled conditions on the range the video shows misfires. A little over a year after Shiloh, Pickett's charge across the field between Seminary and Cemetery Ridges at Gettysburg created much better conditions for the rifled Enfields. But Joshua Chamberlain had to hold off the Confederates on the wooded slope of nearby Little Round Top with a bayonet charge (they were out of ammunition). Conditions there were more like Shiloh. 

The Bio Dictionary piece on Wm Stone was written by Lyftogt, who wrote Iowa's Forgotten General: Matthew Mark Trumbull, also From Blue Mills to Columbia. Except for you, he seems as well versed on 3rd Iowa as anyone. 

I did learn more about Dr. Patrick Gregg of Rock Island. He was a full surgeon and few of those were captured. This probably is further evidence of the chaos at Shiloh. He was about 50 when he enlisted. Dr. Gregg was physician to the murdered Col. Davenport in 1845 and obtained the skeleton of one of his hanged murderers. http://genealogytrails.com/ill/rockisland/court_murder_cgdavenport.htm

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Rbn3

As you are probably aware, the City of Dubuque has its own encyclopedia http://www.encyclopediadubuque.org/

I had a quick look for items relating to 3rd Iowa (since Company A was recruited from Dubuque) but all I came across was an advertisement posted by Captain D.J. O'Neill for recruits to the 3rd Iowa Infantry: (under topic "Civil War" scroll 1/3 way down page)

Cw.jpg contributed by Diane Harris

In process of investigating Dubuque Encyclopedia, stumbled upon "The finding aid for Adams Lee Ogg, Captain, 3rd Iowa Infantry, Co.G" ...it appears the Indiana State Library at Indianapolis holds a substantial collection of his papers and letters (at least forty Civil War letters from Adams to wife, Lizzie; or from Lizzie to Adams Ogg. Also, Lizzie Ogg kept a diary from April 1860 until November 1862). Although entering the 3rd Iowa from Indianola, Iowa, it appears Adams and Lizzie Ogg returned to Greenfield, Indiana after the war (which is why his papers are held by Indiana State Library.)

The only down-side: the Adams Lee Ogg Papers are not available online; they are only accessible at the Library. (Indiana... still stuck in the 20th Century.)

Ozzy

References:  http://www.in.gov/library/finding-aid/S1028_Ogg_Adams_Lee.pdf

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSln=Ogg&GSbyrel=in&GSdyrel=in&GSob=n&GRid=122793280&

 

 

 

 

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You are amazing.

I am in Illinois, so a trip next door to see the Hoosiers may be in order. I have had some luck getting copies from many libraries at reasonable cost, so I'll try that first.

For about 20 years (1985-2005) I owned Grant's pre-war small brick federal style town house on High Street in Galena, so the Dubuque area is of interest to me. I did my best to put the Galena house back to the way it looked when he walked away to go to war. His family stayed there for awhile after that. I took off the "modern" front porch, put on a wood shingle roof, etc. Fortunately the interior had not been altered, except the pocket doors between the front and back parlors were removed. The house was built just before Grant moved in (he was a renter). His Galena presence, of course, was due to the fact that he needed a job and his brother ran the family leather goods business there. Many "copperheads" were there as Galena was settled early in the '20's via the River by Kentucky and Tennessee folks. The rest of Northern Illinois wasn't settled much until after the Black Hawk "War" of 1832, and then mostly by Yankees via the Erie Canal and Great Lakes. Galena was past its prime by the time Grant got there, as the lead miners left en mass in 1849. His big break was that Elihu Washburne was from Galena and he championed Grant. Here's the house file: http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/il0357/

When/if I get the Ogg info I will post it here.

 

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Ozzy,

You may have seen this. Clay Crawford was not at Shiloh but he was imprisoned with Prentiss, et al. Not as good a read as Falling through the Hornet's Nest, but it does offer A Perffect Picture of Hell though the eyes of the Devil himself.

Lawson, Lewis A., 2103, A Rogue’s Life: R. Clay Crawford, Prison Escapee, Union Army Officer, Pretend Millionaire, Phony Physician and the Most Respected Man in Macon, Georgia  McFarland & Company, Inc., Publishers. Kindle Edition. 

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Rbn3

One of the best accounts of time served in Southern prisons is Beyond the Lines: a Yankee Prisoner loose in Dixie. Published in 1863 (shortly after his release) Lieutenant J. J. Geer 48th OVI (and on the Staff of Colonel Ralph Buckland at the time of his capture on April 4th) recounts his time in Montgomery Cotton shed prison and at Macon... and his odd "relationship" with Clay Crawford. Geer was betrayed by a fellow prisoner during one of his escape attempts, and it was difficult to know (difficult for Lieutenant Geer to accept) who was responsible. A  Minister for the Methodist Protestant Church of Cincinnati before the war, Geer underwent a transformation during his POW experience: during 1863 now-Captain Geer toured with Great Locomotive Chase survivor, William Pittenger -- giving lectures to packed halls --  in an effort to "maintain the rage" and advocate for Northern support for Winning the War (as opposed to settling for a negotiated Peace.)

Ozzy

 

Referenceshttp://archive.org/stream/beyondlinesory00geer#page/n9/mode/2up/  J.J. Greer's story

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/20509/20509-h/20509-h.htm  Wm. Pittenger's story

OR 10 pages 89-91 Colonel Buckland's report of April 4th skirmish (and capture of Geer)

 

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I know this is an old post, but I was digging around for info on the 3rd Iowa and came across this interesting tidbit about Turner Bailey (author of the diary this post is about). The diary ends when he loses his lower right arm at Jackson, MS.

So I found what I thought was a  reference to a photo of him in a list of items in the Wm. Oland Bourne Papers. So I excitedly search to see what is available digitally, and find that it wasn't a photo of Bailey, but rather a submission he made to a contest. A contest that William Oland Bourne sponsored, which awarded a total of $1,000 in prizes for the winning entries. And why would I find this interesting enough to post it to this august forum?

The contest was a Left-hand Penmanship Contest for Soldiers and Sailors who lost their right hand in the Civil War.

   William O. Bourne Papers, List of Contributors to the LeftHanded Penmanship Contest, 1st Series

     85. T. S. Bailey, Co. A, 3rd Iowa Infantry, Jackson, Mississippi, 7/12/1863 [date of the injury]

I don't know if Bailey won anything, nor is his entry one of those available online, but it brought a big grin to my face when I realized what it was. What a great idea to raise the morale of the injured vets.

Tim

https://www.loc.gov/collections/wm-oland-bourne-papers/about-this-collection/

 

contest.png

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Tim

One can only wonder at the number of maimed and disfigured men, produced by four years of Civil War, that remained in evidence afterwards as constant reminders of that horrific contest. The fact that so many continued with productive endeavors after incurring their injuries is testimony to the human spirit, and to the generally positive nature of society.

Thanks for posting this example of one attempt by society to acknowledge those who sacrificed so much.

Ozzy

 

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