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WI16thJim

Crump wharf

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Jim

Thanks for posting the photos from 1862 site of Crump's Landing. The location is of interest for more reasons than initially apparent:

  • General Grant with Staff officers briefly stopped here aboard Tigress: rounded the head of Wolf Island and tied up alongside Lew Wallace's commissary boat, Jesse K. Bell, at about 8:30 am on April 6th. The two Generals spoke to each other from their respective boats -- discussed the firing they could hear coming from the south -- (and Lew Wallace was instructed to "wait in readiness for orders to move in any direction.") In addition, Wallace was directed to send a patrol towards Purdy to certify "no Rebel attack was coming from that direction." His orders delivered, U.S. Grant had Tigress cast free her lines and brought underway again; Lew Wallace watched as the HQ boat sped from view around the upper bend, about a mile south. Unknown to either General, news reporter Whitelaw Reid (who had been staying at Lew Wallace's camp) sidled aboard Tigress unseen... and arrived at Pittsburg Landing at the same time as General Grant.
  • Just after 11am on April 6th the Tigress returned and Captain A.S. Baxter QM on Staff of General Grant, disembarked. Baxter met a waiting aide -- Captain Ross on Staff of Lew Wallace -- and the two men rode west to Stony Lonesome; arrived there just before 11:30 am. Baxter received General Wallace's report: "no activity in vicinity of Purdy." Baxter delivered Grant's orders to Wallace (to this day, the subject of much speculation.) After about three minutes, Baxter got back on his horse, rode to Crump's and boarded Tigress for the return voyage to Pittsburg Landing.
  • In accordance with his 11:30 orders delivered by Baxter, Lew Wallace sent the 56th OVI and the 68th OVI to Crump's Landing, with direction to "protect the stores and camp equippage" [Ohio at Shiloh, page 28 and 34]. There is no marker to either regiment at Crump's: the Memorials to 56th Ohio and 68th Ohio are at Shiloh NMP, just north of the line of Siege Guns. In addition, Wallace sent along one gun belonging to Thurber's Battery.
  • Lew Wallace had his HQ tent on top of the bluff overlooking Crump's Landing.
  • It was here at Crump's Landing, in March 1862, that General C.F. Smith stumbled while attempting to leave Lew Wallace's commissary boat and board a yawl (for the return to Savannah) ...and barked his shin against the sharp edge of a seat. (The injury became infected, and General Smith died from complications of this wound on April 25th) [Lew Wallace Autobiography page 445].

Thanks again, Jim

Ozzy

 

References:   http://archive.org/stream/lewwallaceautobiv1wall#page/444/mode/2up  Lew Wallace Autobiography

http://archive.org/stream/ohioatshilohrepo00lcohio#page/34/mode/2up  Ohio at Shiloh

OR 10 page 170 Lew Wallace's Shiloh report

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Glad to be of service. And now I learned something. I always thought when it was said Reid was "miles away" during the "bayoneted in their tents", he was in Cincinnati Ohio. At least he heard the guns. When I stopped to get the pictures, the restaurant was closed (Monday). I saw a couple in the back hauling out garbage, so I overcame my extreme shyness and asked if they had any info on the wharf. They knew zero of the areas connection to the war (I'd be willing to bet some kind of structure was on that bluff even then).  I promised to come back if I found any info. HHHMMMM Free dinner? My favorite price! Be kind cool to find an old photo of the wharf!

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Jim

Did a bit of a search for old pictures of Crump's Landing, and appear to have run across a sketch from 1884/5

crumps-landing-300x187.jpg   Crump's Landing in 1884, looking northwest from the river.

Found on Google Images, the above sketch is of interest because it shows a riverbank choked with reeds... and no wharf. On reflection, I did not find this unusual because there was no wharf at Pittsburg Landing, either: steamboats nosed into the grassy bank, came to rest, tied up to the nearest big tree, and moved passengers and cargo via a gangplank or two. Also, on rivers where "significant rises in water level were the norm" (such as the Tennessee River) it did not make sense to construct a "fixed Wharf" (which had potential of being over-topped by flood waters, and become a hazard to navigation.)

Yet, I had run across references to "a wharf at Crump's."  Did Lew Wallace feel the need to construct such an engineering work? Unlikely, due to belief that departure of the Army of the Tennessee for Corinth was "imminent."  Why waste time with a project that couldn't be used?

Ran across the 2003 book, Three Years with Wallace's Zouaves: the Civil War Memoirs of Thomas Wise Durham (by Mercer University Press) and on page 81 Durham records, "accompanied General Wallace to the river and went with him aboard the wharf boat." When I first read this (several months ago) I assumed it was just a Civil War expression for "commissary boat."  Now, however, I believe Durham was referring to something like this:

http://www.markethousemuseum.com/files/images/mhm-83.preview.jpg Wharf Boat at Paducah (found at Market House Museum). 

Wharf boats were widely used during the Civil War (probably the grandest of its kind was at Cairo):

http://cdn.loc.gov/service/pnp/ppmsca/33200/33226r.jpg  Wharf Boat at Cairo (found at Library of Congress)

Just a floating warehouse that could rise and subside with the frequent crests of the river, a wharf boat would also eliminate the need for construction of on-shore storage facilities. And when Crump's Landing was no longer needed by the Union Army, just tow the wharf boat someplace else.

Ozzy

N.B.  Hope the sketch at top is enough to get you that "free lunch." :)

 

 

 

 

Edited by Ozzy
Correct sketch info.
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I was curious as to the fixed nature of a wharf also. In WI, piers and wharves on rivers are of the floating type that can be removed before the river ices over.

 

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The drawing seems to show the landing road winding up the bluff on the south side of the cabin. The modern landing is in the cut to the north. There also looks be be a large gate at the building. Further up the road near the tree there seems to be another structure of some type. Are those reeds in the river's edge, or a reflection of the trees? Is that a wash tub and drying rack along the shore to the right of the landing? Great drawing!

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I went to Google Images and looked at the picture: shiloh16.jpg                   It does look like reeds.

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Jim

I was troubled by my inability to find the "original source" of the "sketch of Crump's Landing" ...especially after finding one reference indicate "it was Mrs. Crump's House, one quarter mile above Pittsburg Landing."

http://ushistoryimages.com/pittsburg-landing.shtm  (advance to page two)

But at the above "ushistoryimages" site there was included a reference: "Century" (which turned out to be Century Magazine. Apparently that magazine did a "Return to Shiloh" article in 1884/5 that included numerous aspects of the Battlefield as it "then appeared"

http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/text?doc=Perseus%3Atext%3A2001.05.0007%3Apart%3D12.41%3Achapter%3D12.42

From review of that 1885 Century Magazine article, it seems "Mrs. Crump's House" was labelled thus:

http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/image?img=Perseus:image:2001.05.0007.fig00467_1  Crump's Landing. The Widow Crump's House is about a quarter mile above the Landing (does writer mean above as "up slope," or "up river"?) But the best news: the sketch (not done by Lew Wallace) was made from a photograph. So there are photographs taken 1884/5 on file... somewhere (possibly in the archives of whoever took over Century Magazine.)

Always more to the story...

Ozzy

 

 

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Roger

To begin, let's have a look at another newspaper reporter (who gets a frequent mention, but infrequent discussion): William C. Carroll, the man credited with getting the first report of Shiloh "on the wires" perhaps 36 hours ahead of Whitelaw Reid's report. Carroll had spent March 1862 in vicinity of Island No.10 and accidentally encountered newly-promoted BGen John Logan. William Carroll struck up a friendship with General Logan; and Carroll gained appointment to General Logan's Staff (with rank of Major). Assigned duty at Union-occupied Fort Donelson in early April, General Logan proceeded there... but sent his new aide, Major Carroll, on to Savannah Tennessee to report to the Commander of the District of West Tennessee. It appears that William Carroll arrived just before the Battle of Shiloh and was able to accompany General Grant from Savannah up the Tennessee River aboard Tigress. 

At Pittsburg Landing, Major Carroll took note of the day's developments; and was on hand near the Bluff to witness the arrival of the Army of the Ohio (and had a chance encounter with General Don Carlos Buell, and Buell's Staff officers, during which he overheard Buell's true sentiments towards General Grant.) Next day, when it was apparent that the Federal Army was driving the Confederates from the field, Carroll approached John Rawlins (AAG to General Grant) and reported the gossip he'd heard from General Buell. Then, he implied to the upset Rawlins, "what a shame it would be for the Army of the Ohio to get their version of the story of Shiloh reported in the newspapers first."  And Major Carroll was permitted to depart by steamer for the nearest telegraph station.

As William Carroll used his time aboard the steamer to write his "copy" for the Chicago paper, he was surprised by the presence of other reporters aboard the vessel: one of whom was Whitelaw Reid. Engaging Reid and the other reporters in casual conversation, he discovered that the destination for all of them was Cairo, Illinois...the end of the telegraph line. The first reporter to enter the telegraph station would have exclusive access to the "electronic marvel of the Age" and beat every competitor to the "scoop." So, while every news reporter secretly devised his own scheme on how to race, trip, or trick his competition to get to the head of the line, they were all unconcerned when the steamer made a scheduled stop at Fort Henry to take on supplies... only to see William C. Carroll race away from their vessel. Carroll was the sole reporter among them who knew that the telegraph had been extended to Fort Henry.

Cheers

Ozzy

Reference:  http://archives.chicagotribune.com/1891/07/03/page/9/article/the-battle-of-shiloh  July 3rd 1891 of Chicago Daily Tribune, page 9, columns 3 and 4.

N.B.  Carroll's "Battle of Pittsburgh" made it into the April 9th Chicago Tribune and New York Herald, among others.

http://www.nytimes.com/learning/general/onthisday/big/0407.html   New York Times of April 10th 1862

 

 

 

 

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I have never heard that Reid actually made it to the battlefield.  I have another account that says that two 'reporters ' got their accounts of the battle by interviewing wounded men on board one of the steamers at Pittsburgh Landing. I will try to find it when I get home.

It was the dishonest Chicago Tribune that slandered the 77th Ohio with their fabricated account of the battle. Was Carroll from the Tribune?  Great information Ozzy,  thanks much. 

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Jim

Sometimes "context" is important...

I went back and had a look at "The Battle of Shiloh" in Century Magazine of February 1885, and on page 597:

Page image

One sketch is "nested" over the other, which indicates to me that the sketch labelled, "Crump's Landing. Mrs. Crump's house one quarter mile above the Landing" is indeed Crump's Landing (as it appeared in 1884.) The adjoining sketch (featuring a nice home surrounded by white picket fence) is merely a "close view" of the structure at top of the Bluff, which makes vague appearance in the "Crump's Landing" sketch. As for the "barn-like structure" with adjoining gate close to Crump's Landing... we can speculate that it was a working building (for storing farm equipment); perhaps a "boat house" ...or maybe it was used by the locals to store goods temporarily while they waited for the next steamer to take those goods away from Crump's Landing?

An attempt at clarity

Ozzy

 

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A creek runs down to near the "landing". If the Cump house is a quarter mile from the actual river's edge landing, as stated, then that would explain why the river is seen in the right side of the lower picture through the trees and well below the structure (barn). If you google "Crump's Landing", Dr. Google sticks his pin a quarter mile from the River quite close to the creek (wooded creek bed follows the creek depicted in map view). The "reeds" look like cotton plants to me.

Cumps landing.JPG

cotton plants.JPG

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Rbn3

You've got the general area identified, and the site-line from Crump's Landing looks good; now I'll chime in with my estimate:  I believe the road that most approximates the Adamsville-Crump's Landing Road at the time of Lew Wallace's occupation is labelled as "Crump's Landing Road" on your map ( following the contour of the road up-slope from the river, the road initially tracks north, then bends gently left towards the northwest.) Contour maps indicate the height of the bluff to the northwest of Crump's Landing is approximately 70-90 feet above the surface of the Tennessee River, and that elevation is achieved approximately 1000 feet from the river's edge. (The 1884 sketch of Mrs. Crump's house shows the road from Crump's Landing levelling out just before her house; and the house is sited on flat ground on top of the bluff.) One thousand feet is about a fifth of a mile (but I do not believe the photographer of the Crump's Landing images measured the distance exactly; just "ball-parked" the distance as a quarter mile.) In addition, while the image of Crump's Landing was taken from the river, facing northwest, the close image of Mrs. Crump's house was taken with the photographer standing south of the house, facing north (based on the changed aspect of the chimney and trees.)

Given the above, I propose that Mrs. Crump's house was sited along the northeast side of Crump's Landing Road, somewhere from the intersection with Oakland Road to perhaps 300 feet further northwest.

Just a guess...

Ozzy

 

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One can "drive" along those roads by dropping google map's "little yellow person" onto the Road. If you look down the Cump's Landing Road toward the River from where you suggest, you can convince yourself that it was right around the 1000 foot mark near Oakland Rd. 

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Rbn3

I followed your suggestion and moved "the yellow fellow" up Crump Landing Road from the Landing... and I do like that knoll on the right side of the road (at intersection with Oakland Road.) Would be beneficial to have access to the original photograph, to make sure no "poetic license" was taken IRT the sketch.

Unfortunately, if that knoll was site of the house, Mrs. Crump's is gone.

Thanks for posting the detailed map information.

Ozzy

http://www.google.com.au/maps/@35.2176093,-88.3113961,3a,75y,86.77t,0.22r/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sDtSp3vZGidyDJ-YkjS_4Gw!2e0!7i13312!8i6656!6m1!1e1   Google Maps intersection of Crump's with Oakland Road, Crump, Tennessee

 

 

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On 4/12/2017 at 10:54 AM, WI16thJim said:

The drawing seems to show the landing road winding up the bluff on the south side of the cabin. The modern landing is in the cut to the north. There also looks be be a large gate at the building. Further up the road near the tree there seems to be another structure of some type. Are those reeds in the river's edge, or a reflection of the trees? Is that a wash tub and drying rack along the shore to the right of the landing? Great drawing!

The gate was probably to keep yankees out. Yall will just need to come and ride these roads here..One must also figure in the years since..ie bank erosion..and the canalizing of the river and the dam.Look at the picture of Cherry mansion and compare to what you see from accross the west bank.

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