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YEKCIM

Shiloh Visit - April 29, 2017

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I made a day trip to Shiloh this past Saturday to do a little photography.  Photos are HERE if anyone is interested.

 

~Ed

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Mona, I have a Nikon D300 and used both a Nikon 70-200 f2.8 VR2 and a Tamron 28-75 f2.8 zoom lenses.  I have other lenses but these are the two I used for these photos.

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Nice collection of photographs: extremely clear, captured at a good time of year (with everything green.)

Just curious: what (or where) was considered to be the Camp of the 14th Wisconsin?

All the best

Ozzy

 

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Thanks, Ozzy, for your kind words.  I could not find a marker for the 14th WI camp but the April 7th tablets for that unit indicate that they were engaged in the area of the Eastern Corinth Road.  If you've not used it, THIS is an excellent resource for identifying tablets, monuments, etc, and include exact GPS coordinates.

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The 14th WI was not at Shiloh prior to the battle but came down with Buell for the 2nd day. After the battle they camped off the battlefield (not a pleasant place by then) to the west.

 

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Ed and Jim

The image Ed captured of the "Camp of the 14th Wisconsin marker" (sixth photo from the bottom on "smugmug" grouping) caught my attention because it was unexpected. Much like the markers for 56th Ohio and 68th Ohio (which are found on Shiloh NMP, but those units remained at Crump's Landing guarding military stores) I was curious what the Camp marker indicated IRT 14th Wisconsin (because it should make reference to Savannah, Tennessee.)

Cheers

Ozzy

 

N.B.   And when I scanned the "Shiloh NMP -- Monument Location System"

http://www.shilohbattlefield.org/results.asp?varCWUNIT=UWI0014RI&Submit=Submit

I do not find "Camp of 14th Wisconsin marker" listed.  Hence, my surprise...

 

 

 

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Ozzy, the photo you are referring to is the 14th Missouri camp tablet.  It is located just off Hwy 22, directly across from the main entrance to the park.  Interestingly, the Shiloh Monument Locator website apparently has no record of the 14th Missouri camp marker  - at least I could not find it.  The only Missouri Infantry units shown are the 13th, 18th, 21st, 23rd, 25th, and 28th (Federal > Missouri > Infantry > Unit).

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Geez... I didn't realize my vision had gotten that bad. Don't know how many times I looked at that photo (including while wearing reading glasses) to determine what was written in small print... only to totally misinterpret the LARGE print. Thanks for clearing up my confusion.

Ozzy

 

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Great photos, Ed. You covered some ground that day. :)

I really like some of the b&w effects you included. And your first image of the Tennessee Monument is from an angle I don't think I've seen before. Nice job. 

It also looks like we took a nearly identical picture of Ruggle's Battery, several years apart, from kind of a unique angle. This is the one I took in the fall of 2013. See what you think. :)

Silent Guardians

 

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Ed, Perry, et al...

Attaching a link for 1941 Guide Book to Shiloh NMP (because it has a few more "before" photos of interest for comparison.) I personally like the 1930s shot of Pittsburg Landing, showing the short wharf and passenger steamer... and the A.S. Johnston Memorial (with fenced "Johnston Tree" to right of frame) ... and the last map (on final page of the book) showing the "Hornet's Nest" stretching from near Shiloh Church to the Peach Orchard.

All the best

Ozzy

http://www.nps.gov/parkhistory/online_books/brochures/1941/shil/contents.htm  1941 Guide Book: Shiloh NMP

[found at www.nps.gov]

 

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did yall notice they have only 4 burial trenches marked? and i just cant figure out where the photo gragh was taken of the battery reall close to a road..can yall? maybe the road has moved.

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Mona

I only counted four burial trenches, at first. But there are five on the map (symbol for fifth site slightly different.)

Also, in regard to the paddle steamer departing Pittsburg Landing (featured at beginning of 1941 Shiloh Guide Book) that image is cropped: here is the original  http://www.gutenberg.org/files/49379/49379-h/images/pmg036.jpg 

And another interesting steamboat photo:  http://steamboats.com/museum/davet-photos7.html  [Top photo at Dave Thompson Collection, page 7, view of Shiloh Reunion Former Soldiers aboard Tennessee Belle. The image is a bit busy, but remarkably clear for 1927 -- taken at Florence, Alabama.]

Cheers

Ozzy

N.B.  In the original Pittsburg Landing image at Project Gutenberg, the nearest automobile appears to be a 1937 Chevrolet Roadster convertible [which allows dating the photograph 1937-41].

 

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On 5/8/2017 at 8:58 AM, YEKCIM said:

Pretty close, Perry.  I think I like your shot better than mine.

 

I think mine's just zoomed in a little more, or maybe cropped down some. But they sure are close. :)

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3 hours ago, mona said:

did yall notice they have only 4 burial trenches marked? and i just cant figure out where the photo gragh was taken of the battery reall close to a road..can yall? maybe the road has moved.

Mona, the battery picture is of the siege guns. The road in front is the Corinth Road, which of course is now just a trace and not nearly this well defined. I'm not sure when they closed it off - you might ask. Obviously it was sometime after 1941 though. :)

Here's a screenshot I took on Google Maps that shows the location, with the siege guns circled in red.  I've also circled the monuments in the upper-left. You can see them in the background of the original picture, by way of reference. Old photos are cool. :)

chrome_2017-05-11_17-57-20.jpg

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Here's a link to an even earlier picture of the siege guns taken from very near the 1941 spot and from a similar angle. It's from the Kern collection, which we've highlighted on here before, and doubtless will again. No cannons in this image, but the monument is there, which dates the picture to sometime after 1904, when Illinois dedicated its Shiloh monuments. You can clearly see the Corinth Road running in front of the monument in this image. That section of the road is now only a trace, and closed off to traffic. 

http://daytonhistory.pastperfect-online.com/34465cgi/mweb.exe?request=image&hex=K58009.JPG

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yes but i dont remember them being there ever until they were placed there a while back.so the seige guns were on the field in 41? wonder why thy were removed?

 

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i took another look and did find the 5th cbt...i thought i looked for quite some time but this time i found it./ thanks

 

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Mona

Perplexing how links work some places, but not others... if you go into Google Images and place "steamer pittsburg landing gutenberg" in the Search Box and hit [Enter], the uncropped image comes back as a hit on the first page of hits.

[I would post the image directly, but I'm not sure who holds the copyright -- don't want to offend NPS.]

Cheers

Ozzy

 

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Hmmm. I know the siege gun display has been changed some in recent years. I can't remember off-hand the siege guns never being there, but my memory could be fooling me on that. Could be they've come and gone at various times, but I honestly don't know. 

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World War II scrap drives...

I know I've mentioned this before, but it bears repeating. The 1941 Attack on Pearl Harbor caused American War-materials production to ramp up to an extraordinary degree: former automobile and tractor factories across the nation were converted to mechanized tank production... even a tool manufacturer in Wisconsin was contracted to build ocean-going submarines. But all this increased production came at a cost: ready sources of metal had to be utilized (think Beauregard's church bells for cannon production) and that ready source included battle- souvenir artillery in town squares, and elsewhere. (Rock Island Arsenal used to have an extensive collection of Civil War cannon... all scrapped -- see links below.)

The wonder: that National Military Parks succeeded in preserving any artillery pieces.

Ozzy

 

References:  http://www.arsenalhistoricalsociety.org/museum/docs/illustrated_history_2.pdf   see photo page 123.

http://www.arsenalhistoricalsociety.org/museum/docs/Illustrated_History_3.pdf  Scrap use, pages 217- 224 (especially page 223)

 

 

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Johnston's Grave (2).jpg  Sketch of A. S. Johnston's tree (April 1862).

Ran across an interesting diary belonging to then-Corporal Jacob H. Allspaugh, 31st Ohio Infantry, Co.H... and in it (entry for May 12th 1862) was the above sketch. When the 31st OVI arrived on the battlefield (April 20th, part of General George H. Thomas' 1st Division, Army of the Ohio) the "general wisdom" indicated General Albert Sidney Johnston was not only killed at Shiloh, but buried there. A "protective fence" had already been installed around "the Johnston tree" when Corporal Allspath visited "the grave" (recorded in his diary, entry for April 21st.)

Cheers

Ozzy

 

N.B.  Corporal Allspaugh's Diary is on file with Iowa Digital Heritage Collection.

 

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