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Ozzy

Adolph Metzner, sketch artist

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Born in Baden, German Federation in 1834, Adolph Metzner migrated to America in 1856 ...and raised a company of Turner Society members at Indianapolis (which became Company A of the 32nd Indiana Infantry) Colonel August Willich, commanding. Attached to Army of the Ohio after muster in August 1861, the 32nd Indiana occupied Bowing Green, Kentucky in February 1862 ...stopped briefly in Nashville ...and joined the march south and west to Pittsburg Landing to reinforce U.S. Grant. Reaching the west side of the Tennessee River morning of April 7th, Colonel Willich led his men into a gap between W.T. Sherman and Lew Wallace (and gained the admiration of General Wallace for the gallant conduct of the regiment under fire.)

But, most importantly for our purposes: Lieutenant Metzner was a sketch artist, working in pencil of various colors.

willich.jpg   August Willich at Green River, Kentucky 1862 [by Adolph Metzner]

Everywhere the 32nd Indiana went, Metzner managed a sketch (and usually provided a date for the image):

Columbia.png

"Duck River Bridge at Columbia, March 21st 1862" [important because it shows condition of bridge that delayed Buell and apparent depth of the river.] Also, the other places marched through, and dates, are recorded.

As concerns Shiloh, the only images I have encountered (of which there are three) are titled "Casualties."  Adolph Metzner must have been astounded by the horror of Pittsburg Landing, as it presented to him: the images are gruesome and graphic.

The 32nd Indiana joined Halleck's Crawl to Corinth: Metzner sketched scenes enroute, and ten or more in vicinity of Corinth. In addition, the artist sketched numerous images of soldiers and officers of the 32nd Indiana; sketched W.T. Sherman and U.S. Grant; and reproduced scenes from Chattanooga and Atlanta. In all, the Library of Congress holds over 120 sketches Metzner created during 1861-65 (and a further 70 CDVs that are only accessible at the Library.)

Adolph Metzner survived the war, and lived out his life in New Jersey. Upon his death in 1918, his body was returned to Indianapolis for burial.

Cheers

Ozzy

 

References:  http://www.loc.gov/search/?fa=contributor%3Ametzner%2C+adolph&sp=1  Metzner Collection at LOC

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adolph_G._Metzner  Metzner bio at wikipedia

http://32ndindianainfantry.yolasite.com/  32nd Indiana history (includes CDV of Adolph Metzner)

 

 

 

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Wow. Metzner's sketches are fabulous...not for the squeamish, however. The scene of corpses at Stone River is one of the most graphic/gruesome I have seen... probably also realistic. I ordered the book:

 Blood shed in this war: Civil War illustrations by Captain Adolph Metzner, 32nd Indiana / Michael A. Peake. Indianapolis : Indiana Historical Society Press, 2010.

The LOC collection is amazing.

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Mona and Rbn3

I had run across one or two sketches by Metzner, but they were not credited... so did not realize Adolph Metzner was a sketch artist, or that he had produced such a volume of work. As I  reviewed the collected sketches at Library of Congress, the images appeared as an endless stream: "Iron works at Waynesboro,"  "Terry's Texans at Green River,"  "Foote's Ironclads on the Cumberland," ...and a whole range of "personal images" of Hospital Stewards, pickets, formations for roll call, senior officers addressing their troops, and Metzner's take on the images of Sherman and Grant. And a lot more views of the Crawl to Corinth (and significant structures in and around Corinth)... his 120+ sketches serve to fill a significant portion of the "visual gap" produced by the lack of photographic images in the Western Theatre.

Ozzy

 

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Ozzy, you are a "disruptor" in modern economic parlance.  

Because of you I ran across Orderly Sgt/Lt. Robert A. Wolff,  the German "tragedien" actor of 32nd Indiana. Robert was drummed out "for the good of the service" by "Old Rosey" in 1863 for "kissing a nurse." How many lives on both sides could have been saved if only it had been generally known that such an honorable path to a dishonorable discharge existed? Robert re-enlisted in July 1863 but was booted out again a week later when the paperwork caught up with him. But he got his pension.

Robert married Marie and they were engaged in theatrical productions in post-war Louisville. He was the producer/director and actor in "The Last Days of Maximillan" in 1868. But his "day job" (and probably most nights) was as a saloon keeper. He also produced a week long "Sängerfest" for the Louisville Turners.

I have to kick the habit of reading your posts...if I can.

Mrs Robert A Wolff masquerade suits.JPG

Orderly Sergeant Robert Wolf.jpg

Dismissed for kissing a hospital nurse.jpg

Robert Wolff Dismissed for kissing a hospital nurse 1.jpg

Tried to re-enlist.JPG

Orderly Sergeant Robert Wolf description.JPG

Last Days Play.JPG

Civil War Pension Robert A Wolff.JPG

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Rbn3

A few sites have "returned as hits" lately that never had in my previous searches. Don't know if this is because they are new, or if some conscientious librarian has properly catalogued them. In the case of Adolph Metzner, I had never seen mention -- anywhere -- of his impressive sketches. How can that be possible? (Even when I searched "Metzner" on our own SDG site, no hits came back.) Would be interesting to view Metzner's collection of seventy CDV images... but they are currently only available for viewing at a Library of Congress site (of which there are many across the USA, so it is not required to front up in Washington, D.C.)

Speaking of CDV's and early photographic images, have you seen the work of J.D. Edwards?  A few of his Confederate Gulf Coast (Bragg's Army of Pensacola) are contained/linked on this SDG site. Of especial interest to me, because I spent a few summers in Pensacola, and the site of Edward's images still exist: one can stand in the very spot the photograph was captured. In addition, the images of 9th Mississippi and 10th Mississippi are the only ones taken before Battle of Shiloh (so offer an opportunity for ancestors to "discover" their great-grandfathers.)

Recently encountered "contributions" by Henri Lovie that I never knew existed. Coming soon...

Ozzy

 

Reference:  Put "Edwards" in Search Box at top of Home Page this SDG site and hit [Enter].

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Rbn3

Just had a look at the J.D. Edwards sites: civilwartalk link is still working; but the two library sites (New York and Huntingdon) no longer support a "Search" feature for their sites... effectively turning themselves into "screen savers." That's the problem of electronic resources: broken (re-named) links and removal of Search Box.

However, in the case of Southern photographer Edwards, most of his images are now available on "Google Image" search.

Regards

Ozzy

 

 

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Ozzie

In 2006, Joseph Reinhardt's August Willich's Gallant Dutchmen, Civil War Letters from the 32nd Indiana Infantry was published by the Kent State University Press. Meticulously researched, the book contains several CDV's credited to the Metzner Collection at the LOC, including that of Robert A. Wolff.  The book has two index entries for Metzner, the entries being simply lists of officers and promotions. An amazing amount of detail is in the book concerning Robert A. Wolff, including this from a letter (p77) to the Louisville Anzeiger from Pittsburg Landing dated April 9, 1862, by Lt. William G. Mank: "Robert Wolff from Louisville distinguished himself through courage and cold-bloodedness." The letter describes the 32nd's part in the hostilities of April 7th. But it begins with a description of the "slaughtered in their tents" myth, and a scathing denunciation of Grant. Luckily for Lt. Mank (whose name was printed as the author), apparently no one on Grant's staff took the Anzeiger. (Mank went on to become a Brig. General.)

Amazingly, the book does not include a single Metzner illustration nor a mention of Wolff's amorous tendencies. The epilog informs the reader that Robert married Marie Strehly in Germany on June 1, 1846 and died at age 50 of TB in Louisville on July 1874 at the age of fifty. He is buried in Cave Hill Cemetery, Louisville.

BTW, August Willich was a Communist 48'er and a comrade in arms of one Karl Marx. August and Karl had a falling out, so Willich challenged him to a duel. Karl politely declined the offer.

Rbn3

Brigadier General William G. Mank, Union officer in the 32nd Indiana Regiment, head-and-shoulders portrait.jpg

William Mank Brig General.jpg

Lt. Mank wrote letter mentions Wolff Shiloh.jpg

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Rbn3

Thanks for pointing out the existence of Civil War Letters from the 32nd Indiana Infantry by Joseph Reinhardt (2006). Will have to track that down and have a look... as well as the German-language newspaper you site (Täglicher Telegraph? )

While reviewing Metzner's sketches, noticed that many included descriptions and comments scribbled in German. Perhaps the difficulty presented (necessity of translation) is what kept Metzner's work (and the German-language letters of members of the 32nd Indiana) out of public view... until 2006.

Regards

Ozzy

 

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On 6/16/2017 at 4:43 PM, Ozzy said:

Mona and Rbn3

I had run across one or two sketches by Metzner, but they were not credited... so did not realize Adolph Metzner was a sketch artist, or that he had produced such a volume of work. As I  reviewed the collected sketches at Library of Congress, the images appeared as an endless stream: "Iron works at Waynesboro,"  "Terry's Texans at Green River,"  "Foote's Ironclads on the Cumberland," ...and a whole range of "personal images" of Hospital Stewards, pickets, formations for roll call, senior officers addressing their troops, and Metzner's take on the images of Sherman and Grant. And a lot more views of the Crawl to Corinth (and significant structures in and around Corinth)... his 120+ sketches serve to fill a significant portion of the "visual gap" produced by the lack of photographic images in the Western Theatre.

Ozzy

 

yes ive seen several sketches of his not included in the book...kind of a shame they all werent in cluded.

 

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Mona and Rbn3

Tried a different method of searching Library of Congress site... and got back a result with 203 Metzner hits. The CDVs that formerly belonged to Metzner (he did not photograph the persons, but merely did as many soldiers at that time, and collected images of friends and noteworthy persons) are all available for viewing at the attached link, as thumbnails. The itemized contents of his CDV collection are revealed, as are a few additional "works" that did not return with the original 120 from June 16th 2017.

Just thought you'd like to know

Ozzy

 

Reference:  http://www.loc.gov/photos/?q=Metzner%2C+Adolph&sp=6  CDV collection begins page 6- 8 and sketch and works are pages 1- 5. Library of Congress "Photos, Prints, Drawings" for Metzner, Adolph. 

 

 

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Having uncovered every Adolph Metzner sketch and collected CDV currently held at LOC (as of June 2017), believed it beneficial to review those images and see what really was held there. As previously mentioned, Metzner sketched the march of Buell's Army of the Ohio (focusing on the 32nd Indiana and McCook's Brigade) beginning with [March 1862] "Alerted Outpost at Nashville." Shortly after commencing the march, Metzner sketched "Wie der Vollmond.." [an image of General McCook on horseback, leading his troops south]. Dated March 20th is "Rough Sketch of Soldiers Walking with Backpacks," followed by "Bluewater Creek" and "Creek near Columbia, Tennessee." On March 21st is "Duck Creek Bridge" ...then a ten-day gap until "Church at Mount Pleasant [April 1st]" and "Ironworks at Waynesboro" [two sketches of the ironworks.] Then another gap until the creation of sketches at Shiloh Battlefield [where Lieutenant Metzner was engaged Day 2]. 

The above sketches "pinpoint" the route taken by Buell and allow for better understanding of the march accomplished by Army of the Ohio in effecting the crucial join with Grant's Army of the Tennessee.

McCook.png

Wie der Vollmond... The Army of the Ohio, on its way to join Grant. [LOC Metzner sketch of March 1862]

 

Ozzy

Reference:  http://www.loc.gov/photos/?q=Metzner%2C+Adolph&sp=1  Metzner's sketches at LOC

 

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Rbn3

Was reading through the "German Sons of the Civil War" site... quite an impressive undertaking (and features more German regiments than most folks would realize.) Also found your posted selection of CDVs and details IRT August Willich of interest: I vaguely recall "a third name" being associated with Marx and Engels [and it wasn't "Schapper," as claimed by Wikipedia.] It was "Willich" ...and who would have believed that that third personality wound up in America ...and at the Battle of Shiloh? As I previously made mention, August Willich gained recognition in Lew Wallace's Autobiography (pages 561- 565, where Wallace claims August Willich performed "the most audacious act he witnessed during the War.") Upon review of Lew Wallace's Official Report for Shiloh, Colonel Willich is mentioned again (OR 10 page 191): significant because few officers gain the notice of another Division's commander, and get Mentioned in Despatches.

As for Mank, upon review of the German Sons site, found that he had commenced his Civil War career with the 11th Indiana (Lew Wallace's Zouaves) before seeking authority to remove himself and recruit a German Company (that became Company A of the 32nd Indiana.) Of interest for two reasons: most Germans seemed to seek regiment affiliation through the Turners Society, not the Zouave Movement. And then, to become a member of one of the most well-known Zouave regiments -- the 11th Indiana, which fought under Colonel McGinnis Day Two at Shiloh, alongside Willich's 32nd Indiana -- quite a coincidence. 

Just a few observations, from my reading so far...

Ozzy

 

References:  http://archive.org/stream/lewwallaceanaut01wallgoog#page/n78/mode/2up/search/Willich  

http://ebooks.library.cornell.edu/cgi/t/text/pageviewer-idx?c=moawar;cc=moawar;q1=Willich;rgn=full text;idno=waro0010;didno=waro0010;node=waro0010%3A2;view=image;seq=0209  OR 10 page 191 Report of Colonel McGinnis (Colonel Willich is mentioned in the report of the 11th Indiana, too.)

N.B.  I recently visited Trier, Germany on a holiday with my daughter. While we scurried from one Roman ruin to the next, the thousands of Chinese tourists we encountered ignored the Romans and sought out the house of "their favorite German."

 

 

 

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