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svedra

Fuses

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svedra

Link is to my favourite video on Civil War artillery fuses (by presenter calling himself Aquachigger):

 Of the fuses mentioned in the video, I know Bormann fuses were used in some 12-pounder shells at Shiloh (as well as the common wooden fuses, reliable since Napoleon.) I suspect the Naval 8-inch guns and 32-pounders used wooden time fuses gun-metal time fuzes of 5, 10 and 15 second duration. Most field artillery used fuses with times between 1- 5 seconds.

I'm not an artillery expert; just thought I'd start the ball rolling...

Ozzy

 

References:  www.youtube.com/watch?v=ixX2rzH-0Sk  Aqua Chigger Artillery fuse video (above)

http://au.pinterest.com/pin/511440101414402257/  [includes 12-pounder shell excavated at Shiloh with Bormann fuse]

http://ebooks.library.cornell.edu/cgi/t/text/pageviewer-idx?c=moawar;cc=moawar;idno=ofre0022;node=ofre0022%3A2;view=image;seq=794;size=100;page=root  OR 22 (Navy) Lieutenant Gwin reports ordnance expended (and timings set on shells) during Shiloh engagement pages 763- 4.

 

 

Edited by Ozzy
Navy used metal fuzes.

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Since I had never seriously contemplated "Civil War artillery shell fuses" before, thought I would investigate a bit further... and ran across Naval Commander John Dahlgren's Examination of Shells and Shell Guns (1856). After first discovering the Navy spells it "fuze" while the Army mostly spells it "fuse," found the discussion of fuzes occurs pages 129- 152. Dahlgren reveals that the Wooden Fuze had a number of positive aspects, making it reliable, as long as "proper wood, with no knots, splits or other imperfections," was used for the purpose [pages 137- 9]. "Beech" was the wood used by U.S. Navy and Royal Navy (with elm, walnut, ash and linden also acceptable.) But, on page 139, John Dahlgren explains that "...wooden fuzes have given way in the Navy to metal fuzes. These fuzes screw in to the shell, and are made of "gun metal" [nine parts copper, to one part tin, with absolutely no zinc included]."  

Dahlgren also reveals, that as of 1856, the French Navy still used wooden fuzes; and Bormann fuses were most succesful when used with "light artillery."

http://archive.org/stream/shellsandshellg01dahlgoog#page/n170/mode/2up  Dahlgren's Shells and Shell Guns (1856).

Ozzy

 

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