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Stan Hutson

19th Alabama pre-Shiloh letter

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I can't remember if I posted this before or not, but this is pretty neat.  The letter was written by E. W. Treadwell of Company H, 19th Alabama Infantry on 26 March 1862.  Neat insight concerning the days before Shiloh.  You know we are already short of firearms but our Blacksmiths are engaged in making pikes which I think will be valuable to us.  General B. (Beauregard) is gathering up all the church bells he can get to make cannons and I am glad to learn that the churches are sending them in with all the feelings of patriotism that can prompt a true Southerner

It is for sale, so if anyone is looking for an early Christmas present for me :)  HA!

http://www.mqamericana.com/19th_AL_Battle_of_Shiloh.html

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2 hours ago, mona said:

did he survive? and live in the land ruled by the north or go to south america?

Mona, 

Here is what I was able to find on Eluctious William Treadwell, Sr. Wasn't able to find a burial location, sadly. 

-Paul

image.png

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In Johnny Green of the Orphan Brigade - The Journal of a Confederate Soldier, edited by A. D. Kirwan, John Green writes

Daylight April 4th marched by Farmington & Monterey to a point near Shiloh Church.  At Monterey was a black smith shop busy turning out old fashioned pikes to arm some of our troops who had no guns.

I have not read of any accounts of Confederate pikemen being engaged at the Battle of Shiloh, although it is difficult to imagine such troops having any positive effect.  Even given the enthusiasm for Seeing the Elephant present at the time of the battle, if I were armed with a pike, I don't think that I would be seeking to engage the Northern invader.   I recall that Russell F. Weigley in his The Age of Battles: The Quest for Decisive Warfare from Breitenfeld to Waterloo stated that the British (or was it the English army?) had a substantial portion of pikemen as late as 1704, although I don't have the specific passage readily available.

 

Green was enlisted in what was then the 5th Kentucky (CSA), later the 9th Kentucky, in the First Kentucky Brigade (Trabue's / Breckinridge's Reserve Corps) at Shiloh.  (Two Kentucky regiments had claimed to be the 5th - the other one was officially designated the 5th Kentucky, so what was the 5th Kentucky at Shiloh was later designated the 9th Kentucky.)

Edited by Transylvania
Clairificaion
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Shoddy weapons do not make for a confident fighting man.  The 51st Tennessee Infantry was captured when Donelson fell.  But, some of the men from the 51st were not captured and were assigned to the 52nd Tennessee during Shiloh.

"On February 26, ten days after the fall of Fort Donelson, Colonel Benjamin Lea, of the 52nd Regiment, at Henderson Station, reported “I have under my command about 251 of the 51st Tennessee under Lieutenant Colonel Chester, for whom he has secured about 100 common sporting rifles, repaired and cleaned.” 

I have heard speculation before that the "less than stellar" performance of the 52nd Tennessee was due to inadequate firearms, among other things, that would erode the confidence of any force BEFORE the fighting started.  As a veteran myself I can see this to be true.  Under fire for the first time and your weapon is 2nd rate and you have no confidence in it?  Yeah, I can see even the stoutest of hearts possibly running from battle when pressed in such a situation.

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That is interesting that Eluctious Treadwell is buried at Elmwood.  It is a huge cemetery, well over 30,000 graves, and I have numerous ancestors and relatives buried there myself.  Birmingham is my home as well, born and raised, and I knew/know Treadwells at home.  The ones I know are probably kin to Eluctious in some way no doubt.  Small world.

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During the Irish rising of 1798 ("The Year of the French") many of the Irish rebels were armed with pikes. French General Humbert who landed 1000 French regulars at Killala, County Mayo, brought muskets for his allies but when one of the untrained rebels almost shot him accidentally, he made the pike their main weapon. British troops and Irish loyalist yeomanry under Cornwallis routed the rebels and slaughtered many of the pike bearers.

https://www.irishtimes.com/culture/art-and-design/a-history-of-ireland-in-100-objects-pike-1798-1.531709

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