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Ozzy

David W. Reed's brother

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One aspect of David W. Reed -- Father of Shiloh NMP -- that many do not realize, is that he had a younger brother, who also served in an Iowa regiment. This brother died of disease while serving in Tennessee; but for many years, his burial site was unknown. After the war ended, Major Reed spent years attempting to track the site of his brother's grave... and eventually found the answer... only to learn that Corporal Reed's body had been moved from its original location, to another site. And the grave was no longer marked with a name, but a number. Major Reed communicated with Federal Cemetery officials, and after a while, the number was decoded, and Corporal Reed's grave site was identified. In 1895, Major Reed was finally able to mark his brother's grave with a headstone... but the name was misspelled. Having expended an extraordinary amount of time in the endeavor, already; and realizing other members of the Reed Family would be able to locate the marked grave, in spite of the misspelled name, DW Reed brought his efforts in the matter to an end.

The question: in which cemetery relatively close to Pittsburg Landing is David W. Reed's brother buried?

Ozzy

Bonus Points:  What was Corporal Reed's first name?

  • At what town in Tennessee was he originally buried?
  • How is Corporal Reed's name misspelled?

 

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David Reed’s brother was Corporal Milton Reed and died of disease in Jackson, Tennessee on February 2, 1863 at age 19 and was originally buried there. His body was moved to the Corinth National Cemetery after the war where it is marked with a headstone. The name is misspelled as Milton T. Roed instead of Reed.

Tim Smith wrote an article on Reed published in The Annals of Iowa, vol. 62, no. 3, ccin 2003 that relates the story. Find a Grave has a picture of the headstone.

Hank

 

 

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Hank

A champion, who goes the extra mile, as always. (All correct.)

The story of Milton Reed, and David Reed's search for his brother's grave for so many years, got me wondering: Was this an important reason why Major Reed gravitated towards involvement in Shiloh Battlefield, and its preservation? Or was his extended search for Milton symptomatic of "an obsession," and not knowing when to quit?

The story of Milton Reed also has a loose personal connection: a few years ago there was an attempt made to "find out what happened to Cyrus Ballard," a Private in 54th Ohio Zouaves, Company B, who disappeared in late 1862 (last known location with Sherman's Division Hospital near Memphis, dying of smallpox.) If Private Ballard attempted to return home to Ohio by train, and died enroute, Jackson Tennessee is a likely burial site. And, just like Milton Reed, his body may have been moved later to a "numbered grave."

The other personal connections: my Great-Great-Uncle, Thomas Clendenin, a Private in 12th Iowa Infantry, Company H, died in November 1862 after surviving six months as a captive in Southern prisons, while being confined at Annapolis Parole Camp. Required years of searching (and overcoming misspelled names and wrong death date) but we eventually found him in Annapolis National Cemetery. His younger brother, John Clendenin, 6th Iowa Cavalry, Company G, died August 1864 from wounds received at Battle of Killdeer Mountain. Still searching for his burial site...

Cheers

Ozzy

References:  http://ir.uiowa.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=10709&context=annals-of-iowa  Reed article by Timothy B. Smith

http://old.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSln=Reed&GSfn=Milton+&GSbyrel=all&GSdyrel=all&GSst=27&GScntry=4&GSob=n&GRid=3177809&df=all&  Corporal Milton Reed

http://www.findagrave.com/memorial/499339/thos-clendenin  Private Thomas Clendenin 

 

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it's a wonder that he did not have his brother reburied at Shiloh...i wonder which cemetery at jackson..will have to work on that.

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Mona

There was a large Federal Hospital established at Jackson, Tennessee by end of 1862. My guess: the cemetery was close by.

Ozzy

N.B.  http://www.pa-roots.com/pacw/hospitals/hospitallist.htm  List of Civil War Hospitals (Union). The Hospital at Jackson must have been classed as "temporary facility," because it did not make the list.

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