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Ozzy

T. Hurst remembers...

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Thomas Hurst grew up on a farm just outside Savannah, on the east side. His father, 35-year-old Daniel R., worked as both farmer and mill wright; his mother, 32-year-old Elizabeth Black Hurst, mostly looked after Thomas's young brothers and sisters. With the excitement of the attempted Confederate-sponsored State conscription of early March 1862, disrupted by the landing at Savannah of Colonel Worthington's 46th Ohio Infantry, then 13-year-old Thomas Hurst appears to have spent a lot of time in town, acting as witness to all that was taking place. Years later (at the time he wrote this article) he remembers, "the Tennessee River was full to overflowing in March 1862. And the roads were a muddy mess, especially during the first week of April." He knew that "General Buell was to make a junction at Hamburg." And he knew "that the steamer Tigress was General Grant's flagship." 

On Sunday morning, April 6th, "wild staccato of the blazing musketry, accompanied by the sullen roar of thundering artillery" drew him to the waterfront, just behind the Cherry Mansion, where he, "witnessed General Grant lead a cream-colored horse aboard Tigress (despite claims years later that General Grant required the use of crutches, at that time.)"

Some of the other gems remembered by Thomas Hurst:

  • Paymaster Douglas Putnam, on Grant's staff, "gave up his horse about 2 p.m. for use of LtCol McPherson." [McPherson would ride this horse north across Snake Creek, in company with John Rawlins, to meet and hurry forward Major General Lew Wallace.]
  • He saw the steamer Henry Fitzhugh, one smokestack all shot up, making its way downriver carrying the first wounded soldiers away from the battle;
  • He was told by Paymaster Douglas Putnam, who accompanied Grant on the battlefield, that "after dark on Sunday, he went with General Grant to the Tigress and slept aboard." [This is interesting, and does not appear far-fetched, because we know Grant and Rawlins attempted to seek shelter from the rain Sunday night and sleep in the makeshift Hospital. U.S. Grant records that he was unable to rest there, with all the cries from the wounded, and returned outside. Rawlins, on the other hand (in his biography) records that "he slept like a baby in that Hospital." -- Did General Grant really sleep in the rain, under the tree, with Tigress close at hand?] 
  • Thomas Hurst remembers the steamer Glendale (and only the Glendale) as having a calliope on board;
  • Hurst recalls the steamer Dunleith (sometimes spelled Demleith) as being the steamer Governor Harvey was leaving (after visiting wounded soldiers of the 16th Wisconsin) when he slipped and fell into the Tennessee River and drowned.

After the war, Thomas Hurst married Mary Smith and moved to Pennsylvania (where Reverend T. M. Hurst became Pastor of the Presbyterian Church at Arnot.)

Cheers

Ozzy

 

References:  http://www.jstor.org/stable/42637415?loggedin=true&seq=1#page_scan_tab_contents  Battle of Shiloh by T.M. Hurst, pages 82-96.

http://www.findagrave.com/memorial/68880126  Reverend T. M. Hurst

http://www.findagrave.com/memorial/179882598/Daniel-Robinson-Hurst  Thomas Hurst's father, Daniel, of Savannah Tennessee

 

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This would seem to fit in here, though slightly off topic.  This picture shows Cpt. Sol Catterlain or Catterline (hard to make out the name).  But the rest is easy to make out.  Commanding Tigress, Gen. Grant's Headquarters boat on Ohio River 1862.  

Back of image.jpg

Tigress Captain.jpg

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ok...because the capt of the alice dean(#1) when Morgan captured her to use as a ferry to cross the ohio in july 1863 was Capt James Pepper. when Morgan was finished the alice dean was burned---there are parts of this packet boat in several museums ..last saw a piece in august in bradenburg ky(if any of yall have not visited this town is worth the trip!!) later a second packet was built and named alice dean. The McCombs was spared from burning as the owner was a good friend of Basil Duke.

so far i can not find this gentleman but will continue to research.

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Another interest of T. M. Hurst: Steamboats. In particular, steamboats that were involved in transporting troops and armaments to Savannah and Pittsburg Landing in the build-up of Federal force during March and April 1862; those steamers present April 6th; and those that arrived (and departed) shortly after Battle of Shiloh commenced:

Hurst steamers (2).png  (Found in Confederate Veteran, vol.1 page 180.)

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Captains of Steamboats

There are two great resources:  http://www.riverboatdaves.com/  Riverboat Dave's site, for boats, companies that built and owned them, Captains...

The Missouri Daily Republican (a St. Louis newspaper)  http://digital.shsmo.org/cdm/search/collection/dmr/searchterm/1862-02/field/date/mode/exact/conn/and/order/date/cosuppress/1/page/2  (Available, free, at State Historical Society of Missouri.)

The Missouri Daily Republican published a listing (usually page 3, center column) every day, under "Boats Leaving this Day" that provided the steamboats departing and the name of the Captain or Pilot in command (as we know, the captains and pilots frequently changed.) For any particular voyage, if the boat stopped at St. Louis, these details are recorded.

http://digital.shsmo.org/cdm/compoundobject/collection/dmr/id/14846/rec/24  Page 3 of 25 March 1862, provided as example.

Cheers

Ozzy

 

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i was just thinking after seeing the list of all the boats that wee churning up/down stream. wonder how this would have developed if this troop accumulation had been say in aug/sept..when its hot and very dry...the river would not be very navigatable to support this .before the river was channelized/dams built one could ride your horse accross in several spots.

 

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Mona

"Timing is everything."  And this may help explain why leaders (like U. S. Grant) were keen to get on with things. Wait too long, and you must factor:

  • Drought or Flood (such as occurred at Fort Henry)
  • Heat or Snow (such as happened at Fort Donelson)
  • Rain... (probably led to Albert Sidney Johnston delaying Shiloh by one day)
  • Establishment of "artificial barriers" ("Wait for Buell ...and do nothing to bring on general engagement" or "You do not have permission, or authority, to conduct that operation" or "You are not the desired commander to be put in charge of that expedition.")

Military operations have always been subject to Uncertainty and Chance. Which is why phrases such as, "The Gods smiled upon you," and "Strike while the iron is hot" became associated with successful military operations, in times past.

Ozzy

 

N.B.  As regards operations at Pittsburg Landing, the receding flood waters led to Lick Creek being easily fordable; the crossing of Snake Creek (via Wallace Bridge) being possible; and the inability of Sherman's April 1st Expedition proceeding any further up the Tennessee River than Chickasaw Bluff (to hunt down that pesky Confederate gunboat, rumored to be operating in vicinity of Florence Alabama.)

 

 

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