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Ozzy

Shiloh Participants and the Lincoln Assassination Plot

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You can tell from the title this is a "trick question," because there was more than one plot to assassinate Abraham Lincoln, beginning with the February 1861 plan to be carried out in Baltimore, while President-elect Lincoln was completing his train journey from Illinois to Washington, D.C. The following questions relate to unexpected connections of several veterans of Battle of Shiloh -- on both sides -- who later found themselves caught up in some way, with Lincoln Assassination Plots:

  1.   Who was the Union General at Shiloh that sat on the Military Tribunal that tried Booth's accomplices in May/June 1865?
  2.   Who was the Union General at Shiloh believed to have been a target for assassination on the night of April 14th 1865 (but left Washington to visit family in New Jersey, instead of accompanying President Lincoln to Ford's Theatre)?
  3.   The cavalry officer pictured below rode with John Hunt Morgan; was instrumental in helping Morgan escape custody on one famous occasion; but was not present at Shiloh because he had been called to Richmond on business. [This officer initiated the "Confederate Cabinet" in Toronto, Canada in January 1864 with the purpose of advancing the North West Conspiracy.] Name this man. Captain Thomas Hines.jpg
  4.   After the war, the man pictured above was "taken under the wing" of a Confederate General who fought at Shiloh. (While both of them were resident of Toronto, Canada the General provided him with Legal Training; the man Passed the Bar in Memphis, after his Presidential Pardon in 1866.) Name the Confederate General.
  5.   This Confederate Staff officer at Shiloh, a friend of Jefferson Davis, was selected by President Davis to replace the subject of Question No.3 as Chief Agent of Confederate Operations in Toronto (along with Clement Clay.) Soon after arriving in April 1864, the base of Confederate Operations was relocated to Montreal (an easy two-day train journey from Washington, D.C.), and the Missions of the "Canadian Confederate Cabinet" were expanded to include "offering support and encouragement to Peace Groups and disaffected elements in the North;" meddling in Northern politics (the potential to disrupt or otherwise affect the November 1864 Presidential election was recognized); attack the Northern monetary system (gold-price manipulation was one avenue considered); promote efforts to release Confederate POWs from Northern prisons; promote "other schemes" to wreak havoc and destruction behind enemy lines (think St. Albans Raid and the Arson attempt by Greek Fire in New York City.) During this man's tenure as Head of Confederate Operations in Canada, approval was granted to a scheme concocted by Dr. Luke Blackburn of Kentucky to "introduce Yellow Fever to population centers in the North" (and included a special consignment of "infected" clothing: expensive dress shirts, prepared as a gift to President Lincoln.) Clothing from victims of the 1864 Yellow Fever Epidemic in Bermuda was collected by Dr. Blackburn, packed into five chests, and distributed via auction houses in the North. [It was not until thirty years later that mosquitoes were found to be the agent for Yellow Fever infection; contact with infected clothing produced no result... although a coincidental outbreak of Yellow Fever at one of the targetted sites -- the Union Base at New Bern, North Carolina -- resulted in 2000 deaths, and convinced many of those involved of the potential of this style of attack.] Name the Shiloh veteran who became Chief Confederate Agent in Canada.
  6.   This Confederate General at Shiloh, after the war, employed the services of Dr. Luke Blackburn as his personal physician.

Just taking the opportunity to introduce a set of random connections to Battle of Shiloh...

Ozzy

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I needed a break from my continuing and relentless efforts to crush the Shiloh revisionism malarkey of the last forty years or so and decided to see if I could answer this quiz.

 

            1. The man of many talents, Lew Wallace, sat on the Military Tribunal that tried Booth’s accomplices in 1865.

            2. Ulysses S. Grant was fortunate his wife did not like Lincoln’s wife and she had no desire to accompany the Lincolns to Ford’s Theatre on the night of April 14, 1865. Lincoln’s so called security detail failed him miserably but Grant also traveled with a security detail and had he went with Lincoln that night history would be different.

            3. My trusted copy of The Bold Cavaliers revealed the name of this officer and the same picture. The man is Thomas Henry Hines and the picture was credited to the Filson Club in Louisville, Kentucky.

            4. Hines studied law in Toronto with none other than the former vice-president of the United States, John C. Breckinridge. (Source – Wikipedia)

            5. The staff officer was an aide to P.G.T. Beauregard at Shiloh. His name is Jacob Thompson and he served in the cabinet of President Buchanan along with the notoriously inept Rebel General John B. Floyd. (I just searched on Google with the clues given and found his name)

            6. Vincent Price would have made a superb Dr. Luke Blackburn as the story was told of his attempts to introduce Yellow Fever to Northern cities. Interesting to find that despite the attempt at biological warfare Blackburn was elected governor of Kentucky in the 1870s. Anyway, searching Google I eventually found a page of a book which was the biography of John C. Breckinridge and in it was described Dr. Blackburn attending to Breckinridge. They were both Kentuckians so it made sense.

            It is a little tricky to have John C. Breckinridge the answer to two disparate questions but the search for these answers was, as always, beneficial and informative in learning additional facts about the battle of Shiloh.

 

            Merry Christmas and Happy New Year to all.

 

Hank

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Hank

Outstanding effort to find all the answers in less than a day (from the time the questions were posted.)

As time marches on, and more evidence comes to light (and the unthinkable becomes plausible) the real story behind Confederate operations in Canada (and black flag warfare) is revealed...in spite of an attempt to make the History of the Civil War "neat and tidy." For example, the six questions presented above (two of which appear verbose) would make no sense if the narrative was reduced further than was ultimately tendered. In the case of Thomas Hines, his connection to the April 14th assassination is "probably coincidental" ...but with the early identification of John Wilkes Booth as the man seen hurrying out the back of Ford's Theatre (and the obvious resemblance of Hines to Booth) he may have been forced to flee from Detroit to Canada (by commandeering the ferry to Windsor at gunpoint, on April 16th.) In any event, Hines's action gave credence to the rumor "Booth had gone north."

Plausible deniability. Arms-length approval of operations. Efforts to "put nothing into writing." These aspects of the Canadian Confederate operations have hindered the search for the Truth; yet, by examining earlier missions; and missions that did not produce desired results... and scrutinizing the flow of those missions (from conception through approval to attempt) the very similar links, one operation to another, can be identified. 

Again, Bravo Zulu on finding all the known (so far) Lincoln assassination plot connections to Shiloh. And Merry Christmas!

Ozzy

 

 

 

 

 

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On 12/20/2017 at 6:13 PM, hank said:

I needed a break from my continuing and relentless efforts to crush the Shiloh revisionism malarkey of the last forty years or so and decided to see if I could answer this quiz.

I don't think we could find a more dedicated defender of Benjamin Prentiss than you've proven to be, Hank, even though I don't see him the same way. But I think he'd probably appreciate your standing up for him. 

As for the, um, "revisionism malarkey" at Shiloh, I'll have more to say on that subject, as well as on Prentiss, when the time comes. For now though, I'll add my own little trivia question - who was one of the earliest revisionists of the battle of Shiloh?

I don't want to give away his name, but here's a hint: his initials are Benjamin Mayberry Prentiss. 

Perry

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Perry

I've been gardening all morning, and decided to take a break... and ran across your provocative post (the kind I wish we had more of at SDG, because it is only by testing and comparing and revealing evidence, that we find the Truth.) Here is my response: "The first revisionists were these"

  • "Prentiss was captured early in the day on April 6th" -- (initials W.R.)
  • "Don Carlos Buell was responsible for Union Victory at the Battle of Shiloh" -- DCB
  • "William Tecumseh Sherman was the Hero of Shiloh" -- USG
  • "Although only six miles away, Lew Wallace got lost on his way to Shiloh" -- ANY
  • "We have won a Complete Victory" -- PGTB

My point? There was so much inaccurate information after Battle of Shiloh -- so much that was claimed, without evidence; so much CYA (both sides); so much obfuscation -- that we are still coming to grips with the true story, 150+ years later...

All the best

Ozzy

 

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Well, as I mentioned, I'll have more to say about revsionism, and Prentiss, when the time comes. It will be more than just a little that I have to say. :) 

Perry

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I didn't watch, but I that's okay. I don't need Jack Nicholson to explain to me what revisionist history is, and how badly the term gets misused.

And I'm looking forward to it more. :) 

Perry

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