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Perry Cuskey

Christmas Bells

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Sometimes from the depths of anguish and despair emerges something beautiful and inspiring. Such is the case with a Christmas song that started out as a poem, written in the middle of a seemingly endless war by a man who was no stranger to either anguish or despair. I'll let the video below tell the rest of the story. It's very much worth a listen.

However life may find you as we near the end of 2017, I wish you better days ahead, and a truly wonderful 2018. Merry Christmas, folks.

Perry

 

 

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Lovely poem/song, Perry.  I've always liked H W Longfellow's work.  Here's wishing you and all the members of the Shiloh Discussion Group, peace in your heart this Christmas and good health in 2018.  

THE MANASSAS BELLE

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Wishing everyone a Happy Christmas; and may 2018 be your best year yet!

And, for those seeking "a Shiloh connection," I offer the following link (something IRT a man named Ambrose Bierce):

http://articles.latimes.com/2011/dec/20/opinion/la-oe-koenig-ambrose-bierce-and-christmas-20111220  Devil's Dictionary?

Cheers

Ozzy

 

N.B.  For those who have never have never had the good fortune to peruse The Devil's Dictionary by Ambrose Bierce (published 1906):   http://www.gutenberg.org/files/972/972-h/972-h.htm  [available online by Project Gutenberg].

Stemming from his own military experience and interest in politics, the definitions of the following words are worth a look:  barracks, abatis, battle, dragoon, freedom, grapeshot, hash, insurrection, lead (the metal), man, omen, politics, President, projectile, radicalism, Rebel, recruit, republic, road, rumor, turkey (the bird), valor, vote, war, Yankee, year... and the Letters "x" and "J."

 

 

 

Edited by Ozzy
The Devil's Dictionary.
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Here's a link to the original poem, below, including stanzas that weren't included in the song when first published in 1872 by a British composer named John Baptiste Calkin. Even though two stanzas are missing and the others rearranged in the musical version, the spirit of the original poem is maintained. I think that video has the most beautiful version of the song I've ever heard.

http://www.hwlongfellow.org/poems_poem.php?pid=40

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