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Dean

Hi from Montreal Canada

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Greetings from Montreal.

My name is Bradford Dean and I only just begun researching my family history on my father's side who were for the most part farmers with large families. My great great grandfather Henry Dean was born in Newfoundland and moved to Maine, then moved again to Wisconsin, Portage county, where he had 8 children, the first born Benjamin was 18 in the census of 1860. As many young farmers in Wisconsin he answered the call for volunteers by the new President Abraham Lincoln. Benjamin volunteered into the 16th Wisconsin regiment, company H. He took part in the battle of Shiloh and was reported missing April 6. He was taken prisoner and was held in Macon Georgia where he died shortly thereafter in August 4. Quite probably he died of disease. His grave is as yet unknown to me and I have to wonder how hard the news must have been for his parents or even if they knew where to find his remains.

I've read the battle of Shiloh as of yesterday with special attention given to the fate of the Wis 16th where my great grand uncle fought and bled among those who still remained in Prentiss' withering division all of whom he must have regarded as his friends. His younger brother Alexander of 3 years, my great grandfather, could not have remembered him. In fact no one mentioned we had a civil war combatant when growing up. Maybe his loss was too painful to mention by his immediate family. I'm grateful nevertheless to learn about him and perhaps to be able to be the first to locate his grave and pay homage and to thank him for his service.

 

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Bradford Dean

Although I've already had incidental contact with you, allow me to take the opportunity to greet you formally. I found this SDG site four years ago while conducting research for my book, Falling through the Hornet's Nest; and because Battle of Shiloh was such a significant chapter (yet not fully understood) in the history of my family, I've invested a bit of time in understanding how the battle came about; why it progressed the way it did; and what happened afterwards.

I've been able to provide a few tips on Camp Oglethorpe because my G-g- uncle and his two cousins shared that experience (members of 12th Iowa Co.H). Here is another tip: make use of the "Search Box" at top of the Home Page of Shiloh Discussion Group. A few suggested words to search: map, maps, letter, letters, diary, prisoner, and Wisconsin (because a handful of regiments were from Wisconsin, the 16th Regiment of Volunteer Infantry comes back as about half the "hits" ). However, if you choose to only get 16th WISC then insert "16th Wisconsin" (surrounded by quotation marks) and hit [enter].

Welcome to SDG! Hope you are able to find answers to all your questions

Ozzy

 

 

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Hello  Bradford, I understand that many of the men who died at Macon were disinterred after the war and moved to Andersonville National Cemetery. 

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Thank you all for your kind responses. For reasons I'm not aware Benjamin Dean is not reburied in Andersonville National Cemetery. My guess is that he was buried without name in a mass grave in Macon Georgia and/or was mislabeled. I sent a letter to the Dept of Vet Affairs inquiring for his whereabouts. I'm certain they have resources not available to simple Google searches I've been using thus far.

Thanks again everyone and must say I enjoy this forum website quite a bit and all the rich information that has been placed in here.

Cheers

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Welcome Dean and I hope you will enjoy researching the regiment that won the battle of Shiloh and the civil War, the 16th WVI!

Jim

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Hello Bradford, I read that in 1866 the bodies of 244 Union prisoners were removed to Andersonville Cemetery and placed in section B. 160 of the bodies were unidentifiable. There is the possibility that some were moved to the  local Rose Hill Cemetery. The site of the prison was never used as a fairgrounds again and became a rail yard in 1870.

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