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HELLO FROM WISCONSIN-- SHILOH STUDY

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Hello, My name is Thomas Arliskas. I am the author of the book, Cadet Gray and Butternut Brown, Notes on Confederate uniforms. I have been selected to be one of the Speakers at the Kenosha Civil War Museums annual Fall symposium. This years topic will cover the Battle of Shiloh. I will be sharing the stage with the likes of Professor Tim Smith and Larry J. Daniels. Good Company! My topic will be the material culture and the common soldier who fought there. Will cover the uniforms and the types of weapons used by both sides. I have been doing research type projects for over 40 years on the Civil War and Shiloh was a part of that. I originally started out with studying Illinois in the Civil War and from there Confederate clothing and uniforms. I have started my research for the Fall presentation, and found this site. Lots of information here! So, how important is the study of uniforms and clothing at Shiloh? Some will say none at all, some will say a lot. It has to do with what your interests are. If you just like reading casually about the Civil War; Generals, Campaigns, Battles, Politics, Lincoln, Davis, your focus will not be how the 1st Louisiana or 32nd Indiana were uniformed at Shiloh. Blue and Gray is enough for you. But now--- If your ancestor was in those Regiments, if you are commissioned to do a painting, if you collect memorabilia, or if you own an original Civil War firearm from these Regiments, you are going to want to know how they looked, maybe their Regimental Flag, and what firearms were issued to see if yours matches ordnance records.

Shiloh carries a mystique all its own. Even the men who fought at Shiloh remember it as a horrible Battle, not a game changer, just another slug fest to contend with and then move on. Island No. 10, got more Press in the papers! Few Books are available covering the Battle itself, as opposed to Gettysburg or Antietam. Yet there are hundreds, thousands of diaries, letters, memoirs, pamphlets, stories about the Battle of Shiloh everywhere ready to be found. 

I have promised the NPS and the folks at Shiloh Park that when done I will send them what I have found on the Armies at Shiloh, North and South. Their uniforms, clothing, firearms, flags, and comments on all of it. Of course I will cover other aspects of the Battle. Like both Grant and Johnston-- though not in the common soldier category, they certainly had a role to play in the history and outcome. If you do have any information you feel I could use- please let me know-- This is a project in search of knowledge to be compiled for all those interested on just another piece of Civil War History.

Sincerely,

Tom Arliskas

Happy to be a Forum Member.


 

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7 minutes ago, CSuniforms said:

Hello, My name is Thomas Arliskas. I am the author of the book, Cadet Gray and Butternut Brown, Notes on Confederate uniforms. I have been selected to be one of the Speakers at the Kenosha Civil War Museums annual Fall symposium. This years topic will cover the Battle of Shiloh. I will be sharing the stage with the likes of Professor Tim Smith and Larry J. Daniels. Good Company! My topic will be the material culture and the common soldier who fought there. Will cover the uniforms and the types of weapons used by both sides. I have been doing research type projects for over 40 years on the Civil War and Shiloh was a part of that. I originally started out with studying Illinois in the Civil War and from there Confederate clothing and uniforms. I have started my research for the Fall presentation, and found this site. Lots of information here! So, how important is the study of uniforms and clothing at Shiloh? Some will say none at all, some will say a lot. It has to do with what your interests are. If you just like reading casually about the Civil War; Generals, Campaigns, Battles, Politics, Lincoln, Davis, your focus will not be how the 1st Louisiana or 32nd Indiana were uniformed at Shiloh. Blue and Gray is enough for you. But now--- If your ancestor was in those Regiments, if you are commissioned to do a painting, if you collect memorabilia, or if you own an original Civil War firearm from these Regiments, you are going to want to know how they looked, maybe their Regimental Flag, and what firearms were issued to see if yours matches ordnance records.

Shiloh carries a mystique all its own. Even the men who fought at Shiloh remember it as a horrible Battle, not a game changer, just another slug fest to contend with and then move on. Island No. 10, got more Press in the papers! Few Books are available covering the Battle itself, as opposed to Gettysburg or Antietam. Yet there are hundreds, thousands of diaries, letters, memoirs, pamphlets, stories about the Battle of Shiloh everywhere ready to be found. 

I have promised the NPS and the folks at Shiloh Park that when done I will send them what I have found on the Armies at Shiloh, North and South. Their uniforms, clothing, firearms, flags, and comments on all of it. Of course I will cover other aspects of the Battle. Like both Grant and Johnston-- though not in the common soldier category, they certainly had a role to play in the history and outcome. If you do have any information you feel I could use- please let me know-- This is a project in search of knowledge to be compiled for all those interested on just another piece of Civil War History.

Sincerely,

Tom Arliskas

Happy to be a Forum Member.


 

Hey Tom, Stan Hutson here.  Not sure, but you may remember me from facebook, I posted Confederate images on there, especially Alabama images.  Have been taking a break from FB.

There are a lot of knowledgeable people on this forum.  There are a ton of topics and subtopics to scroll through, much like civilwartalk.com.  I have been on this forum a long time, and even I have not gone through all of the older forum topics.

On this forum I have posted roughly 400 images of soldiers associated with Shiloh, killed or wounded, along with images from Fort Donelson and the Iuka/Corinth Campaign.

So, welcome to the group.  Many will be willing to assist if they can I am sure!

Stan

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Stan! Of Course I remember you! I am a big follower of yours. I was just browsing through the photos you have on this post and find them wonderful as to uniforms and firearms. The Wisconsin men in the 4 button State Blouses; Unique canteen and haversack straps; their Dresden-Suhl Muskets. The 23rd Missouri in their St. Louis Depot jackets. The Illinois men in their State Jackets. Iowa in the Regulation frock coats and caps! You have it. Not done the Confederates yet. One thing at a time. The one Group mentioned the most often were the troops from Louisiana-- the Crescent Regiment-- and their appearance on the Battlefield of Shiloh. Dressed in blue and marching in perfect step! I am going to cover them in my presentation. Thank You for your support already!

Tom Arliskas

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Thomas

Welcome to SDG!  As regards uniforms and battle flags of the Civil War: best described as "work-in-progress." Although the average person today, when contemplating the soldiers who fought in that conflict, often simplify the contest as, "the Blue vs. the Grey," and although the end of the Civil War may have approximated a two-tone struggle, even in April 1865 there were to be found shoe-less Rebels wearing butternut. And Union regiments wore individually distinctive hats, and many rallied behind green battle flags.

Uniform... the word itself sums up the intention, "to make everyone look the same." And yet, at the very start of the war, the concern rested with making sure soldiers of individual companies (80 - 100 men) were distinct, adorned in colours and styles that identified the members of that company. After a few months, the effort shifted to one of "making soldiers belonging to an entire regiment (800 - 1000 men) look identical." But there were still huge differences in colour and style, one regiment compared to another; and women back Home stitched and sewed the pants, jackets and flags that went to war.

For the North, Montgomery Meigs is most responsible for attempting "uniformity, on a grand scale," beginning middle of 1862 (after Battle of Shiloh) in accordance with pre-war Army Regulations that had been simply ignored -- not a priority -- until the second year of the struggle. (Acquiring manpower, weapons, food, tents, gunboats, horses, wagons... these were the initial priorities.) For the South, the Confederate Uniform was prescribed by General Orders No.9 issued at City of Richmond on 6 June 1861, and which stipulated the "cadet-gray color" and the style and location on the uniform of rank insignia, and different colored collars to signify the particular specialty (such as black, for Medical Officers.)

For visualization and comparison, the following references are of value: Don Troiani (several books and artworks, including Don Troiani's Civil War and Regiments and Uniforms of the Civil War.) Surprisingly, toy makers are good sources (makers of miniature soldiers strive for accuracy.)

But, even after sorting out standardization of Blue vs. Grey, there is still the matter of the Zouaves...

Wishing you every success with your research

Ozzy

 

References: SDG "Wood's Brigade -- What Artillery Battalion" post of 29 MAR 2015.

SDG "Antebellum fitness club" post of 9 MAR 2015.

Montgomery Meigs (place Meigs in Search Box at top of SDG Home Page).

http://www.acwtoysoldiers.com/Confederate Sets/CSA_CS_GenANV19pc.html  Extensive collection of Civil War Miniatures.

http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/world/csa/army-uniform.htm  Confederate General Orders No.9 of 6 JUN 1861.

http://www.alibris.com/booksearch?browse=1&mtype=B&qwork=7418813  Don Troiani's Regiments and Uniforms

http://www.amazon.com/Don-Troianis-Civil-Brian-Pohanka/dp/0811727157  other Civil War references by Don Troiani.

SDG soldier images (mostly CDV) posted by Stan Hutson.

 

N.B.  The three figures in the avatar at top wear the grey uniform of the 1st Iowa Volunteer Infantry Regiment, worn at Battle of Wilson's Creek, August 1861.

 

 

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4 hours ago, CSuniforms said:

Stan! Of Course I remember you! I am a big follower of yours. I was just browsing through the photos you have on this post and find them wonderful as to uniforms and firearms. The Wisconsin men in the 4 button State Blouses; Unique canteen and haversack straps; their Dresden-Suhl Muskets. The 23rd Missouri in their St. Louis Depot jackets. The Illinois men in their State Jackets. Iowa in the Regulation frock coats and caps! You have it. Not done the Confederates yet. One thing at a time. The one Group mentioned the most often were the troops from Louisiana-- the Crescent Regiment-- and their appearance on the Battlefield of Shiloh. Dressed in blue and marching in perfect step! I am going to cover them in my presentation. Thank You for your support already!

Tom Arliskas

Thanks Tom.  Yes, I have worked hard on the images for the Shiloh Discussion Group page, hoping this place can be a kind of repository for them.  I am sure I have amassed the largest online collection of Federal and Confederate soldiers killed, wounded, missing, POW, etc., at the Battle of Shiloh.  

It seems like for some regiments both North and South at Shiloh we can paint a thorough picture of what they looked like and what they were wearing, but with other units, not so much.  I will help out where I can, and good luck in your endeavors.  Find attached an article describing, literally down to the maker, of the J. Curry Rifles, Company I, who were Alabamians that were serving in Blythe's Mississippi Battalion.  If you save the image to your computer, you can open it up and zoom in to read it.

Stan

31296_195493-00021.jpg

arms and equipment.jpg

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Stan!!! Wahoo!!! That was awesome. I don't know if everyone on the Forum has seen that, but it is a great find for uniform researchers. For the record, the Don Troiani painting of Johnston at Shiloh with the Arkansawyer's, I helped with the research on that one. I have done 12 or 13 research projects for Don that ended up as paintings in his book. I have also done research for many Civil War authors and other painters like Don. 

As to Ozzy's comments. For the Confederates they were under the Commutation System for clothing. A sum of $25.00 later raised, was given to the soldiers by the CS Government to help pay for clothing for service or a uniform. Some confusion reigned in the opening weeks of the Civil War when three sets of unofficial regulations for CS uniforms appeared in the papers. Several States, [Republics] authored their own Regulations for their "State Army," which also led to a sea of different cuts in uniforms and colors. By the late summer of 1861 all this finery and fluff was gone. Now it was getting cold and the soldiers needed warm clothing. The CS Government did not have the resources to produce 200,000 new uniforms for its Forces. Instead they opted for an "Appeal"-- the "Great Appeal" for warm winter clothing by donation by its citizens. And it worked. All manner of clothing was sent out to the Camps and Forts for the Confederates. Some of it was uniform in nature, the largest part homespun walnut dyed clothing of the Bush Variety as it was described. So they got their donated clothes! You might get a black pair of pants, a red or white cotton shirt, a civilian blouse or uniform jacket or frock as part of the big pile of clothing placed in front of you. Wool pants cost you more than cotton, and a uniform jacket more than a civilian blouse, and it came out of your commutation money$$$. Or ---if you were lucky Mom or your Wife sent out some new clothes just for you. From that you had for Spring, 1862, descriptions of "no-two dressed alike," or "half-civilian half military," when looking at a Confederate Regiment or Brigade on parade. The result of the Commutation System and the Great Appeal for donated clothing for the winter of 1861-1862. This is the exact description we get of Confederates, how they appeared at Shiloh. Each Confederate Company and Regiment had their own story as to how they were dressed at different times during the War. The Louisiana Troops, the State Militia Troops that came with Bragg to fight were much better uniformed than those from Tennessee, Mississippi, and Alabama.

Tom Arliskas

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14 minutes ago, WI16thJim said:

Welcome Tom. It's always good to have as many cheeseheads on here as possible.

 

Jim

Yeah! The 14th, 16th, and 18th Wisconsin-- they won the Battle of Shiloh single-handed you know!!

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The flag of the 4th Missouri Infantry, which may be one of the earliest examples of a Van Dorn battle flag.Van Dorn flag.

 

Cary (2).jpg

 

Although the forces of Earl Van Dorn were noted at Shiloh by their absence, they did arrive in time to defend against the May 1862 Siege of Corinth. As regards the flag... after accepting the handcrafted banner in November, Major General Van Dorn carried it with him in January 1862 when he took command of the Trans-Mississippi. But, by the time Van Dorn arrived in Arkansas, two more Confederate-affiliated State governments had been accepted as members of the Confederacy: Missouri (end of November) and Kentucky (December 1861.) So, there is doubt as to the original number of stars on Van Dorn's flag: eleven, twelve, or thirteen. However, by time it was put to use as template for regiments belonging to Van Dorn's trans-Mississippi, 13 stars were standard (as indicated by above flag belonging to 4th Missouri Infantry.)

Every flag used during the Civil War had its own peculiar story.

Ozzy

 

ReferencesRecollections Grave and Gay (1911) by Mrs. Burton Harrison, Scribners & Sons, New York (pages 60 - 63, especially page 62, copied above.)

http://www.civilwarvirtualmuseum.org/road-to-war/   extracts on Earl Van Dorn and Pea Ridge.

http://www.4thmoinfantry.com/Unit-History.html  4th Missouri Civil War Reenactment Regiment.

 

N.B.  See following post, as the story continues...

 

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Of course, Civil War history would not be worthwhile without a bit of controversy...

Have a read through the following link:  http://michelle-hamilton.blogspot.com.au/2015/01/museum-of-confederacy-lecture-and-flag.html

Now that "the real" Van Dorn Flag has been revealed (the one Earl Van Dorn never used)... who made "the brownish red flag" actually used by Van Dorn?

 http://gen.1starnet.com/civilwar/9cvflag.htm  (another example of Van Dorn flag used in trans-Mississippi, with period description.)

Ozzy

 

 

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Tom, "Yeah! The 14th, 16th, and 18th Wisconsin-- they won the Battle of Shiloh single-handed you know!!" Not only did the 16th win the battle, they won the war!

 

Jim

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On 5/19/2018 at 8:58 AM, CSuniforms said:

Stan!!! Wahoo!!! That was awesome. I don't know if everyone on the Forum has seen that, but it is a great find for uniform researchers. For the record, the Don Troiani painting of Johnston at Shiloh with the Arkansawyer's, I helped with the research on that one. I have done 12 or 13 research projects for Don that ended up as paintings in his book. I have also done research for many Civil War authors and other painters like Don. 

As to Ozzy's comments. For the Confederates they were under the Commutation System for clothing. A sum of $25.00 later raised, was given to the soldiers by the CS Government to help pay for clothing for service or a uniform. Some confusion reigned in the opening weeks of the Civil War when three sets of unofficial regulations for CS uniforms appeared in the papers. Several States, [Republics] authored their own Regulations for their "State Army," which also led to a sea of different cuts in uniforms and colors. By the late summer of 1861 all this finery and fluff was gone. Now it was getting cold and the soldiers needed warm clothing. The CS Government did not have the resources to produce 200,000 new uniforms for its Forces. Instead they opted for an "Appeal"-- the "Great Appeal" for warm winter clothing by donation by its citizens. And it worked. All manner of clothing was sent out to the Camps and Forts for the Confederates. Some of it was uniform in nature, the largest part homespun walnut dyed clothing of the Bush Variety as it was described. So they got their donated clothes! You might get a black pair of pants, a red or white cotton shirt, a civilian blouse or uniform jacket or frock as part of the big pile of clothing placed in front of you. Wool pants cost you more than cotton, and a uniform jacket more than a civilian blouse, and it came out of your commutation money$$$. Or ---if you were lucky Mom or your Wife sent out some new clothes just for you. From that you had for Spring, 1862, descriptions of "no-two dressed alike," or "half-civilian half military," when looking at a Confederate Regiment or Brigade on parade. The result of the Commutation System and the Great Appeal for donated clothing for the winter of 1861-1862. This is the exact description we get of Confederates, how they appeared at Shiloh. Each Confederate Company and Regiment had their own story as to how they were dressed at different times during the War. The Louisiana Troops, the State Militia Troops that came with Bragg to fight were much better uniformed than those from Tennessee, Mississippi, and Alabama.

Tom Arliskas

Tom, 

I only wish Troiani would have done more Shiloh prints.  I know he is more heavily into Rev War now, and I don't foresee many Civil War projects from him in the future, that is to say Western Theater stuff.  

And yes, was neat to see that insanely detailed account of how the J Curry Rifles were armed and outfitted.  They were one of 2 Alabama companies that became part of Blythe's Mississippi Regiment.  No doubt the gear mentioned is what they would have been carrying at Shiloh.

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Another factor to consider IRT uniforms and flags and boots... the sewing machine. Although a variety of devices to aid in sewing had been around since the 1700's, it was American Elias Howe who was manufacturing the most sought-after machine at the start of the Civil War (Singer was still up and coming, but would finish the Civil War strong.) And, there was concern at the start of the War whether the manufacture of sewing machines would continue, as the emphasis was on muskets and pistols and other war items. But, Montgomery Meigs saw the application of sewing machines in industrial-scale production of uniforms, and although the majority of Northern soldier's uniforms were hand-stitched before 1862, after 1862 the majority of pants, coats and footwear (and flags) were machine-made. (It required only 60 seconds to completely sew one boot, using a machine.)

For the South, the production of uniforms remained mostly "by hand," primarily due to sewing machine manufacture occurring solely in the Northern States (and foreign-produced machines were mostly stopped by the Union Navy's blockade.) A recent study of hundreds of Civil War uniforms in possession of museums discovered that 76% of the Union uniforms were machine sewn, whereas only two percent of Rebel uniforms were sewn by machines  http://americancivilwarvoice.org/2014/06/03/the-sewing-machine-and-the-civil-war/   

Just a footnote to the uniform story...

Ozzy

 

References:  American Civil War Voices: The Sewing Machine and the Civil War

http://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/000505081  Scientific American, 1860 through 1865, but especially Vol.7 (page 102 and 105.)

 

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On 5/19/2018 at 9:51 AM, CSuniforms said:

Yeah! The 14th, 16th, and 18th Wisconsin-- they won the Battle of Shiloh single-handed you know!!

Oh please dont get Jim started again!

 

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Uniform and Flag stories from Shiloh

These are some of the interesting incidents involving uniforms and flags at Battle of Shiloh:

  • the 12th Illinois Infantry changed out of its old grey uniform into blue during the march to battle, morning of April 6th 1862;
  • at least one "friendly fire" incident occurred, involving Rebel troops shooting their own due to the wearing of dark blue (or black) jackets;
  • recent volunteers signed into Union service at Savannah during March/April 1862 ( 40th Illinois, 46th Ohio and 14th Iowa) may not have been issued with proper uniforms prior to Battle of Shiloh;
  • the Jessie Scouts wore Rebel uniforms when performing their duties (but wore a distinctive scarf or armband -- usually white -- upon return to Union lines to avoid being shot by friendly troops)
  • the "Stars and Bars" Flag (1st CSA National Flag) continued to pose problems at Shiloh (misidentified as American Flag)
  • at least one Confederate regiment was ordered to wear its jackets inside out (with cream-coloured liner obscuring the dark colour of the uniform jacket)
  • everyone knows the "white flag" represents surrender; but at the time of Shiloh, the "yellow flag" meant Hospital (and sometimes a "red flag" was used)
  • ambulance wagons and steamers pressed into Hospital service usually carried no marker (and Hospital boats were sometimes used to carry munitions)
  • when representatives from General Beauregard travelled to Richmond, end of April, to present the General's Shiloh Report to President Davis, they also carried with them 28 flags, banners and pennants captured at Shiloh.

 Cheers

Ozzy

 

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Thank You Ozzy, ---Your help is appreciated! Two heads are better than one, or three or five! On the 12th Illinois, I have the complete history on this-- wagons of blue uniforms distributed the morning of April 6th. The same situation could have involved the 9th Illinois Infantry. Some of them still in gray, but am not done with that research. On the Blue uniformed Louisiana troops, yes.-- They came up from New Orleans dressed in blue jackets and gray trousers-- not a great uniform appearance for Shiloh. Working on that one too. Just found some more descriptions on their appearance during the Battle. On the 40th Illinois and the 2 Ohio Regiments not being properly uniformed-- FILL ME IN ON THOSE-- Still working on Ohio Quartermaster operations for the Fall of 1861- Spring of 1862. The Flags, I have notes, but have not yet dug into those. The Regiment told to reverse their jackets, I have that somewhere-- but FILL ME IN on that too! 

The Union Army did have three Zouave Regiments at Shiloh. The 11th Indiana still dressed in gray at Shiloh, according to one veteran. The 53rd and 54th Ohio were in Zouave type uniforms at Shiloh.  McArthurs' Brigade wore Scottish tams into Battle. The Confederate were said to have a number of Zouave Companies in their ranks from Louisiana. The Washington Artillery-- and other Artillery units had distinctive uniforms. On the Scouts-- a white band attached to the hat or arm, was also used in Missouri by Union Home Guard Companies, so ordered by General Lyon himself to distinguish them from the Missouri State Guard. 

Thank You Again for your help. Tom

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Washington Light Artillery of New Orleans, 5th Co.       [image from ACW Toy Soldiers.]

According to Facebook post of Shiloh NMP dated 21 July 2017, it was Lieutenant Slocomb of the battery who had the Louisiana Washington Artillery turn their blue jackets inside out on the morning of April 6th 1862.

Same Facebook post records, "Kentucky troops may have fired into Trabue's Louisiana troops (wearing blue jackets on Sunday afternoon.)"

Again, the Facebook post reports, "Lieutenant A. V. Vetner (CSA) was killed by the 4th Louisiana as he rode past."

The 4th Louisiana is recorded as "engaged with a Tennessee Regiment" [OR 10 page 489.] Colonel Allen: "A Tennessee regiment in our rear fired on us." [That regiment may have been the 33rd Tennessee -- their report (OR 10 page 435) records "confusion."] SDG topic "Friendly Fire Incident with 4th Louisiana Confederates" of 30 March 2010 records additional details. And SDG topic "Route for Tim's Epic Hike" of 24 SEP 2014 records the scene of "Shiloh's most famous friendly fire incident in vicinity of Lost Field."

OR 10 pages 422 - 3 Report No.146: Colonel Bell insists, "The 33rd Tennessee fired into us." [More details to be found SDG topic "Attack on Waterhouse's Battery that Succeeded" -- especially posts of 21 AUG 2016 (two posts.)]

OR 10 page 430 Report No.151 of the 13th Arkansas "observed an officer shot down by Louisiana troops." [This officer may have been Brigadier General SAM Wood, who may have still been wearing the dark-coloured uniform from his days with the 7th Alabama -- see photograph  associated with SDG topic "Wood's Brigade: what artillery battery" by lelliott19 (16 NOV 2016) (the CDV image with five officers posed for camera.)] Also, SAM Wood's report OR 10 page 592.

Cheers

Ozzy

 

References:  http://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=coo.31924077730160;view=1up;seq=533  OR 10 of Rebellion Records

http://www.acwtoysoldiers.com/Confederate Sets/CSA_ART_LA_WashLtArtNO5thCo.html  ACW Toy Soldiers (image at top of post.)

http://www.facebook.com/ShilohNMP/posts/1413422985414350   Shiloh NMP post of 21 July 2017.

 

 

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Tennessee's Union Volunteers

"...no clothing or entrenching tools could be had while the Army was at Shiloh, for sixteen or eighteen days before the battle" -- Colonel Thomas Worthington, 46th Ohio, in sworn testimony August 1862.

Colonel Worthington got himself into trouble with Brigadier General William Tecumseh Sherman at the start of the March 1862 Advance up the Tennessee River, when the steamer carrying his 46th Ohio and another steamer carrying the 40th Illinois (Colonel Hicks) powered ahead of the Federal convoy (without authority) and arrived at Savannah days in advance of Brigadier General C. F. Smith. Ignored by Sherman was a beneficial outcome: the breaking up of a "Recruitment Party" then underway, initiated by Confederate authorities, in accordance with Tennessee State Law of 28 November 1861, and activated by Governor Isham Harris upon his arrival in Memphis (the new CSA State capital) after evacuating Nashville. It is estimated in excess of 500 military-aged men had replied to the summons, and had gathered at Savannah by end of first week of March; and that number swelled to perhaps 1500 by the start of April. (On March 6th the men gathered at Savannah Tennessee were enrolled; the "Muster into service" was slated to take place on the 10th... but Hicks and Worthington arrived March 7 and 8, and the Recruitment Party was interrupted.)

Many of the civilians drawn to Savannah were Union-supporters, who expressed desire to fight for the Union cause. Hicks and Worthington took advantage of the opportunity, and it is believed at least forty men joined the 40th Illinois, and over forty joined the 46th Ohio. (A further unknown number joined the 14th Iowa; and perhaps 30 - 50 joined the Navy and served aboard Lexington and Tyler, and the soon-to-be commissioned Alfred Robb.)

There were two problems with these new recruits: availability of uniforms, and their "official military status" (because some had been Enrolled for Confederate service on March 6th, or had other "prior attachment.") Availability of uniforms is questioned due to information presented in SDG topics: "A Revelation of War: civilians in Hardin County Tennessee in Spring 1862" -- in particular, posts of 29 MAY 2017; 1 JUN 2017 (by rwaller); and 1 JUN 2017 (by Ozzy), with attention to General Orders No.17 of March 1st 1862 (signed by John Rawlins) directing, "all regiments with extra clothing will distribute that extra clothing to other regiments requiring same. Afterwards, all extra clothing to be sent to Cairo Illinois." Depending on how well these instructions were followed, there may not have been many spare uniforms available, just prior to Shiloh (as reported by Colonel Worthington.)

What were the Tennessee Union soldiers wearing at Shiloh? Were they able to get proper uniforms, or did they borrow items from other soldiers, or did they have an ad hoc "uniform" of dark mufti? [Still under investigation, so answer remains unknown.]

However, it is of interest to note that at least one captured man, taken prisoner upon the collapse of the Hornet's Nest, was shot on General Beauregard's orders, due to having "served improperly with the 14th Iowa Infantry." This man was deemed to have been previously mustered into Confederate service, and was "acting as a traitor to the Cause, having joined the ranks of the enemy." [Sam Watkins in Company Aytch (1900) pages 40 - 41 records this man as "Rowland," shot at Corinth on April 12th.] His real name was William C. Rolan of Lawrenceburg Tennessee, who is recorded in the 14th Iowa roster as belonging to Company H.

The question: What gave this man away? His manner of speaking, or his "different uniform"?

Ozzy

 

References:   http://archive.org/stream/coaytch00watk#page/40/mode/2up  Sam Watkins Company Aytch 

http://iagenweb.org/civilwar/books/logan/mil406.htm  Roster of 14th Iowa Infantry by Guy Logan

http://civilwartalk.com/threads/pows-from-shiloh.94639/   Discussion of Wm.C. Rolan, including documents.

 

 

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I would agree, I would say either his accent OR the possibility of being seen by someone who knew him and they identified him.  I guess he "could" have come clean and said who he was, to some type of CS authorities, for whatever reason (may have been questioned?)  But, then again, how many of the men captured at the Hornets Nest would have been interrogated by CS authorities?  

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As far as blue uniforms on CS troops.  Many people in the SDG know Keith Willingham.  He asked me once if i had ever found any images of soldiers, particularly officers, of the 16th Alabama Infantry wearing blue uniforms.  It was a point of research interest for Keith, but not of mine, so I am not sure where the account came from that some 16th officers wore blue uniforms (I don't doubt the report, just need to ask Keith for the reference, would love to see it).  But, I happened upon this image of 2nd Lt. Goodloe Pride, Company A, 16th Alabama Infantry not too long ago.  

It sure looks like to me he is wearing a blue frock coat, or a heavily bluish gray.  Enough so that either way, if that was being worn, it could be mistaken for a Federal jacket from a distance.  

Jr. 2nd Lt. Goodloe Pride, Company A, 16th Alabama Infantry, WIA Jonesboro.jpg

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On 5/22/2018 at 6:46 PM, Ozzy said:

Washington Light Artillery of New Orleans, 5th Co.       [image from ACW Toy Soldiers.]

According to Facebook post of Shiloh NMP dated 21 July 2017, it was Lieutenant Slocomb of the battery who had the Louisiana Washington Artillery turn their blue jackets inside out on the morning of April 6th 1862.

Same Facebook post records, "Kentucky troops may have fired into Trabue's Louisiana troops (wearing blue jackets on Sunday afternoon.)"

Again, the Facebook post reports, "Lieutenant A. V. Vetner (CSA) was killed by the 4th Louisiana as he rode past."

The 4th Louisiana is recorded as "engaged with a Tennessee Regiment" [OR 10 page 489.] Colonel Allen: "A Tennessee regiment in our rear fired on us." [That regiment may have been the 33rd Tennessee -- their report (OR 10 page 435) records "confusion."] SDG topic "Friendly Fire Incident with 4th Louisiana Confederates" of 30 March 2010 records additional details. And SDG topic "Route for Tim's Epic Hike" of 24 SEP 2014 records the scene of "Shiloh's most famous friendly fire incident in vicinity of Lost Field."

OR 10 pages 422 - 3 Report No.146: Colonel Bell insists, "The 33rd Tennessee fired into us." [More details to be found SDG topic "Attack on Waterhouse's Battery that Succeeded" -- especially posts of 21 AUG 2016 (two posts.)]

OR 10 page 430 Report No.151 of the 13th Arkansas "observed an officer shot down by Louisiana troops." [This officer may have been Brigadier General SAM Wood, who may have still been wearing the dark-coloured uniform from his days with the 7th Alabama -- see photograph  associated with SDG topic "Wood's Brigade: what artillery battery" by lelliott19 (16 NOV 2016) (the CDV image with five officers posed for camera.)] Also, SAM Wood's report OR 10 page 592.

Cheers

Ozzy

 

References:  http://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=coo.31924077730160;view=1up;seq=533  OR 10 of Rebellion Records

http://www.acwtoysoldiers.com/Confederate Sets/CSA_ART_LA_WashLtArtNO5thCo.html  ACW Toy Soldiers (image at top of post.)

http://www.facebook.com/ShilohNMP/posts/1413422985414350   Shiloh NMP post of 21 July 2017.

 

 

Ozzy made mention of the 7th Alabama Infantry.  1st Lt. John Dickinson of the 7th Alabama Infantry (57 years old, photo probably taken in or near Pensacola).  He is dressed like a Federal officer to the T, blue frock coat and all.

1st Lt. John Dickinson, 7th Alabama Infantry, 57 years old, Elisha's father.jpg

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The Alabama Volunteer Corp- The Alabama State Army, Their Official Uniform Regulations were for a uniform of dark blue. And, many of the Alabama Volunteers and Companies wore blue in the first months of the Civil War. Is it possible that some of the Officers continued to use their Alabama coats-- of course. Tom

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