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Ozzy

Name this man.

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With the weekend approaching, thought it might be interesting to pose a "Quiz with a Twist." Read the clues and see if you can determine the identity of this Rebel leader:

  • I was commander of a sizable force of Rebel troops at Shiloh;
  • At the onset of the Secession Crisis, I was living at Monticello. My first service was with the Jefferson Rifles;
  • A few years before the war, my friend, Jefferson Davis (Secretary of War) appointed me to an important Government post;
  • In 1853 I travelled by steamer with my wife from New Orleans to Nicaragua; crossed to the Pacific Coast; and continued my voyage to Astoria (Oregon). During the course of that voyage I met George B. McClellan;
  • In the course of my duties in Washington Territory I met U.S. Grant (and became acutely aware of his drinking problem);
  • I was a member of the 34th Congress, serving in the House of Representatives with the likes of Humphrey Marshall, Felix Zollicoffer, Preston Brooks, Alexander Stephens, Howell Cobb, Schuyler Colfax, Nathaniel Banks and Elihu Washburne;
  • I wrote my autobiography after the war (but it requires effort to find a copy).

Who am I?

 

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Did you know there are thirty-three places named "Monticello" in America? That was the twist: purposely withholding Monticello FLORIDA from one of the clues.

J. Patton Anderson is one of those remarkable men who easily slips under the radar, unless active steps are taken to investigate their story. But, what made Anderson especially interesting: Braxton Bragg's claim that, "Patton Anderson was his best friend" [http://shilohdiscussiongroup.com/topic/1876-braggs-memoirs/ Letter of April 1876.] What was it this man saw in Bragg that most chose to ignore?

But, even after tracking down Anderson's Autobiography, there remained a lot of unanswered questions (primarily due to gaping holes in the narrative -- more a sketch, than a full-sized autobiography http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00085628/00002?search=reminiscence ).

Anyway, congratulations to Transylvania for answering this latest quiz correctly!

Ozzy

 

 

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My turn, then.

I commanded a sizable force of Rebel troops at the Battle of Shiloh;

I am one of just a few (perhaps the only) Confederate general officer who surrendered (or was surrendered, that is, was a subordinate to the commander who signed the articles of  surrender) twice to Union forces.

I was born in the .... (well, that would make it even easier).

Who am I?

 

 

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Transylvania

Great question ! (And yours has a twist as well...)

Because I believe you are referring to the "double-surrender" of Joseph E. Johnston, which took place at Bennett's Farm in North Carolina on April 18 and April 26, 1865. After William Tecumseh Sherman offered similar terms to those accepted by Robert E. Lee on April 9th, and those terms were accepted by General Johnston on April 18, the signed Document of Surrender was forwarded to Washington... and the new Administration -- following the Assassination of President Lincoln -- decided Sherman's terms were too generous; and disallowed the surrender of Johnston and his 88,000-plus soldiers. Ulysses S. Grant travelled south to meet with Sherman, personally; to explain the situation; and to get Sherman to modify the original terms.

It is evident from reading Sherman's Memoirs part 2 (pages 354 - 361 and especially page 365) that he was not happy about his original agreement being disallowed; but he put on a brave face, followed orders, and convinced the Confederate commander to go through the process again (April 26th.) Joseph E. Johnston in his Narrative of Military Operations (pages 248 - 9) indicates that he had been in conversation with senior Confederate Government leaders at the time of the first Surrender; and was ordered to "return to the field" instead of agreeing to the second set of terms. But General Johnston disobeyed that order, signed the Second Surrender document, and disbanded his Army. 

At the time of General Joseph Johnston's surrender, there were three Confederate generals -- veterans of Shiloh -- either present with Johnston, or close enough to be affected by the terms of the Surrender. General PGT Beauregard accepted the terms of the Second Surrender, and returned to Louisiana.

Of the remaining two, one abandoned his post and returned to the direct service of President Jefferson Davis... only to surrender (due to capture) in May 1865.

The other general (partly the cause of the First Surrender being disallowed) fled south to Florida, hijacked a small boat on the Atlantic coast, and eventually made his way to Canada.

Question:  What were the names of the two Shiloh veterans who refused to go along with Johnston's Second Surrender?

 

 

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