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Stan Hutson

New 16th Wisconsin Infantry album

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Some of you may notice what appears to be repeated images on the lower right of the forum main page.  I have already posted these images, but decided to make an album unto itself for this group of images.  They are all of members of Company E, 16th Wisconsin Infantry who were killed, wounded, mortally wounded, captured, etc., at Shiloh, all on 6 April 1862.  Given their connection to Shiloh, this is simply an amazing group of images with no equals out there that I know of at present, in relation to Shiloh that is! 

The only reason you will ever see a "repeat" image normally is if I go back and delete an old picture and replace it with a better quality image of that same picture.  I have done that for several images now.  See an image, then later find a better copy of that same image, so, I use that one.

I hope that somehow this grouping of images, in some shape, form, or fashion, will be kept together for posterity.  Hope ya'll enjoy them!

Stan

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Company E was the company that carried the flags. The circle of honor at the cannon in Shiloh's cemetery are the headstones of six members of Company E.

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All of them are wearing the State issued 5 button blouse. A distinctive piece of clothing. They also had a State issued haversack and canteen that was different from the rest. They were issued Dresden Suhl Rifled muskets. A very good Class A firearm which they used with devastating effect at Shiloh. Awesome.

Tom

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5 hours ago, CSuniforms said:

All of them are wearing the State issued 5 button blouse. A distinctive piece of clothing. They also had a State issued haversack and canteen that was different from the rest. They were issued Dresden Suhl Rifled muskets. A very good Class A firearm which they used with devastating effect at Shiloh. Awesome.

Tom

Tom can you post a picture of that type of weapon?  These "Dresden muskets", "Prussian muskets", etc., get highly confusing to me, which is which, etc.

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Just now, CSuniforms said:

Dresden Suhl Rifle.jpg

These guns are very heavy--- 16 pounds-- but were considered Class A by the Ordnance Bureau. I have a great quote from a Wisconsin soldier at Shiloh-- although sad and unfortunate-- He stated his Dresden Suhl would pass through 3 files of CS soldiers every time he shot-- He was amazed!!! Tom

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OK, now I'm confused. Everything I've ever found on the 16th WI rifle at Shiloh stated they had 69 caliber Belgian rifles, which weren't very popular.

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3 hours ago, WI16thJim said:

OK, now I'm confused. Everything I've ever found on the 16th WI rifle at Shiloh stated they had 69 caliber Belgian rifles, which weren't very popular.

I am with you Jim, in that this is where I get confused.  I think many people who don't know, including myself, incorrectly use "Dresden, Prussian, Belgian, French" style musket, when in actuality they look different.  I totally defer to Tom on answering your question though.  The imported muskets from Europe and their use at Shiloh, again, has always confused the devil out of me.

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See, the image you posted, I had always called that weapon a "Saxon" rifle.  Don't ask me why or where that term got in my head, but I have referred to it as such for years.  These European weapons can get truly confusing.  It should have struck me, the big DUH factor, though.  I have seen TONS of images of Wisconsin soldiers armed with the Dresden Suhl, don't know why I didn't put 2 and 2 together and realize this is what they were referring to and what the 14th, 16th, and 18th were carrying at Shiloh.  Pretty neat knowing that so many of these were on the field at Shiloh.

But, again, that reference I made to the 15th Mississippi, they make mention of using "Belgian and Austrian" muskets.  I wonder, instead of a TRUE Austrian and/or Belgian musket, they were referring to Dresden's?

Pictured:  Austrian Lorenz rifle musket.

FLA-3331-Product.jpg

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Don't you love it when you answer your own question.  I see now that the term "Dresden rifle musket" and "Saxon rifle musket", have been used interchangeably over the years, but they are indeed the same weapon.  

Tom, were the Dresden/Saxon's mainly rifled .69s at Shiloh?  Or did they make smooth bore .69 Dresden/Saxon's and/or other caliber .54/.58?

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They were rifled .69 caliber. Awesome firearms-- I have here right next to me-- came out of Wisconsin-- I am sure it was used at Shiloh??$$%!!-- That is my story and I am sticking to it.-- 

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